CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USf 326

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Campbell S.C.J., Selya, and Lynch C.JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

IRELAND

Requested State

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

25 July 2000

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Appeal allowed, return refused

HC article(s) Considered

12 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
In re Walsh, 53 F. Supp. 2d 91 (D. Mass. 1999); In re Walsh, 31 F. Supp. 2d 200 (D. Mass. 1998); Report of the Second Special Commission Meeting to Review Operation of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, 18-21 January 1993, 33 I.L.M. 225 (1994); Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996); Prevot v. Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995); Toren v. Toren, 191 F.3d 23 (1st Cir. 1999); Explanatory Report by Elisa Pérez-Vera, Hague Conference on Private International Law, Acts and Documents of the Fourteenth Session 426, vol. III, 1980; Nunez-Escudero v. Tice-Menley, 58 F.3d 374 (8th Cir. 1995); Re A. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1988] 1 FLR 365; Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145; C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 FLR 403; Department of State, Hague International Child Abduction Convention: Text and Legal Analysis, 51 Fed. Reg. 10,494 (1986); Blondin v. Dubois, 189 F.3d 249 (2d Cir. 1999); Blondin v. Dubois, 19 F. Supp. 2d 123 (S.D.N.Y. 1998); Turner v. Frowein, 752 A.2d 955 (Conn. 2000); Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551 ; P. v. B. [1994] 3 I.R. 507; P.R. Beaumont and P.E. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction', 1999; Jeffrey L. Edleson, The Overlap Between Child Maltreatment and Woman Battering, 5 Violence Against Women 134 (1999); Anne E. Appel and George Holden, The Co-Occurrence of Spouse and Child Abuse: A Review and Appraisal, 12 J. Fam. Psychol. 578 (1998); Lee H. Bowker et al., On the Relationship Between Wife Beating and Child Abuse, in Kersti Yllo and Michele Bograd, Feminist Perspectives on Wife Abuse 158 (1988); Susan M. Ross, Risk of Physical Abuse to Children of Spouse Abusing Parents, 20 Child Abuse and Neglect 589 (1996); H.R. Con. Res. 172, 101st Cong., 104 Stat. 5182 (1990); Opinion of the Justices to the Senate, 691 N.E.2d 911 (Mass. 1998); Custody of Vaughn, 664 N.E.2d 434 (Mass. 1996); Re K. (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1995] 1 FLR 977; N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107; Re F. (A Minor) (Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1995] 3 All ER 641; H.R. Con. Res. 293, 106th Cong. (2000); Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995).

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Convention Aims
Convention Aims

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Limited Nature of the Exceptions
Grave Risk of Harm
Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse
Child's Objection
Separate Representation

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Undertakings
Procedural Matters
Enforcement of Return Orders

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children, a girl and a boy, were 8 1/4 and 3 1/4 respectively at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. They had lived in the United States and Ireland. The parents were married and had joint rights of custody. They travelled to Ireland separately in January 1994 since the father was facing serious criminal charges in the United States. Shortly thereafter, following repeated incidents of physical abuse, the mother obtained a protective order against the father.

The Irish social services agencies then became involved as concerns were raised as to the care given to the children. Further problems arose when the father destroyed possessions in the former matrimonial home. In November 1997 the mother and her new boyfriend took the children to the United States, the mother's State of origin. On 18 December 1998 the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts ordered the return of the child, subject to undertakings.

On 12 January 1999 while preparations were being made for the return, the mother's sister filed a motion to intervene on behalf of the children. In addition, both the mother and her sister filed motions to dismiss or vacate the District Court's order of 18 December. The mother's sister contended, inter alia, that the fugitive disentitlement doctrine barred the father, a fugitive from justice in Massachusetts, from petitioning the federal courts.

At a hearing on the same day the District Court allowed the mother's sister to intervene, but limited her intervention to the issue of whether the fugitive disentitlement doctrine barred the father's petition. On 11 June 1999 the District Court denied the motion. However, it stayed execution of its order pending appeal. The mother and the intervenor appealed against the return order and the decision to limit the intervenor's intervention. The father cross appealed against the District Court's decision to allow the intervenor's intervention and the decision to stay the return order pending appeal.

Ruling

Appeal of the mother allowed; removal wrongful but return refused; the standard required under Article 13(1)(b) had been met. The court found that a high probability existed that the father would violate the undertakings he had given and, as a consequence, the children would remain at grave risk if returned.

INCADAT comment

A summary of the first instance decision of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts of the 18 December 1998 is found at: [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 222].

Convention Aims

Courts in all Contracting States must inevitably make reference to and evaluate the aims of the Convention if they are to understand the purpose of the instrument, and so be guided in how its concepts should be interpreted and provisions applied.

The 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, explicitly and implicitly, embodies a range of aims and objectives, positive and negative, as it seeks to achieve a delicate balance between the competing interests of the central actors; the child, the left behind parent and the abducting parent, see for example the discussion in the decision of the Canadian Supreme Court: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 17].

Article 1 identifies the core aims, namely that the Convention seeks:
"a) to secure the prompt return of children wrongfully removed to or retained in any Contracting State; and
 b) to ensure that rights of custody and of access under the law of one Contracting State are effectively respected in the other Contracting States."

Further clarification, most notably to the primary purpose of achieving the return of children where their removal or retention has led to the breach of actually exercised rights of custody, is given in the Preamble.

Therein it is recorded that:

"the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody;

and that States signatory desire:

 to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention;

 to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence; and

 to secure protection for rights of access."

The aim of return and the manner in which it should best be achieved is equally reinforced in subsequent Articles, notably in the duties required of Central Authorities (Arts 8-10) and in the requirement for judicial authorities to act expeditiously (Art. 11).

Article 13, along with Articles 12(2) and 20, which contain the exceptions to the summary return mechanism, indicate that the Convention embodies an additional aim, namely that in certain defined circumstances regard may be paid to the specific situation, including the best interests, of the individual child or even taking parent.

The Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report draws (at para. 19) attention to an implicit aim on which the Convention rests, namely that any debate on the merits of custody rights should take place before the competent authorities in the State where the child had his habitual residence prior to its removal, see for example:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 362]
 
Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 839]

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 214]

Netherlands
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 316]

Switzerland
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 986]

United Kingdom - Scotland
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 996]

United States of America
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 125]
 
The Pérez-Vera Report equally articulates the preventive dimension to the instrument's return aim (at paras. 17, 18, 25), a goal which was specifically highlighted during the ratification process of the Convention in the United States (see: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) and which has subsequently been relied upon in that Contracting State when applying the Convention, see:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 741]

Applying the principle of equitable tolling where an abducted child had been concealed was held to be consistent with the purpose of the Convention to deter child abduction.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578]

In contrast to other federal Courts of Appeals, the 11th Circuit was prepared to interpret a ne exeat right as including the right to determine a child's place of residence since the goal of the Hague Convention was to deter international abduction and the ne exeat right provided a parent with decision-making authority regarding the child's international relocation.

In other jurisdictions, deterrence has on occasion been raised as a relevant factor in the interpretation and application of the Convention, see for example:

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 754]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 50]

Aims and objectives may equally rise to prominence during the life of the instrument, such as the promotion of transfrontier contact, which it has been submitted will arise by virtue of a strict application of the Convention's summary return mechanism, see:

New Zealand
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 296]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 60]

There is no hierarchy between the different aims of the Convention (Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report, at para. 18).  Judicial interpretation may therefore differ as between Contracting States as more or less emphasis is placed on particular objectives.  Equally jurisprudence may evolve, whether internally or internationally.

In United Kingdom case law (England and Wales) a decision of that jurisdiction's then supreme jurisdiction, the House of Lords, led to a reappraisal of the Convention's aims and consequently a re-alignment in court practice as regards the exceptions:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Previously a desire to give effect to the primary goal of promoting return and thereby preventing an over-exploitation of the exceptions, had led to an additional test of exceptionality being added to the exceptions, see for example:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 901]

It was this test of exceptionality which was subsequently held to be unwarranted by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

- Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine:

In United States Convention case law different approaches have been taken in respect of applicants who have or are alleged to have themselves breached court orders under the "fugitive disentitlement doctrine".

In Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 150], the fugitive disentitlement doctrine was applied, the applicant father in the Convention application having left the United States to escape his criminal conviction and other responsibilities to the United States courts.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 326]

In the instant case the father was a fugitive. Secondly, it was arguable there was some connection between his fugitive status and the petition. But the court found that the connection not to be strong enough to support the application of the doctrine. In any event, the court also held that applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine would impose too severe a sanction in a case involving parental rights.

In March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 386], the doctrine was not applied where the applicant was in breach of civil orders.

In the Canadian case Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 760], the father's fugitive status was held to be a factor in there being a grave risk of harm facing the child.

Author: Peter McEleavy

Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Allegations of Inappropriate Behaviour / Sexual Abuse

Courts have responded in different ways when faced with allegations that the left-behind parent has acted inappropriately or sexually abused the wrongfully removed or retained children. In the most straightforward cases the accusations may simply be dismissed as unfounded. Where this is not possible courts have been divided as to whether a detailed investigation should be undertaken in the State of refuge, or, whether the relevant assessment should be conducted in the State of habitual residence, with interim measures being taken to attempt to protect the child on his return.

- Accusations Dismissed:

Belgium

Civ. Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 706]

The father claimed that the mother sought the return of the child to have her declared mentally incapable and to sell her organs. The Court held, however, that even if the father's accusations were firmly held, they were not backed up by any evidence.
 
Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 666]
 
The Court held that if the mother had serious concerns with regard to her son, then she would not have left him in the care of the father on holiday after what she claimed there had been a serious incident.
 
J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, No 500-04-046027-075 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 968]

The mother claimed that a grave risk arose because the father was a sexual predator.
The Court noted that such allegations had been rejected in foreign proceedings. It equally drew attention to the fact that Convention proceedings concerned the return of the child and not the issue of custody. The fears of the mother and of the maternal grandparents were deemed to be largely irrational. There was also no proof that the judicial authorities in the State of habitual residence were corrupt. The Court instead expressed concerns about the actions of members of the maternal family (who had abducted the child notwithstanding the existence of three court orders to the contrary) as well as the mental state of the mother, who had kept the child in a state of fear of the father.

France
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 704]

The Court rejected the allegation of physical violence against the father; if there had been violence, it was not of the level required to activate Article 13(1)(b).

New Zealand
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 303]

The Court rejected arguments by the mother that the father's alleged sexual practices would place the child at a grave risk of harm. The Court held that there was no evidence a return would expose the child to the level of harm contemplated under Article 13(1)(b).

Switzerland
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Appellate Court of the Canton Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 426]

The mother argued that the father was a danger to the children because, inter alia, he had sexually abused the daughter. In rejecting this accusation, the Court noted that the mother had previously been willing to leave the children in the father's sole care whilst she went abroad.

- Return ordered with investigation to be carried out in the State of habitual residence:

United Kingdom - England and Wales

N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 19]

The possible risk to the daughter needed to be investigated in the pending custody proceedings in Australia. In the interim, the child needed protection. However, this protection did not require the refusal of the application for her return. Such risk of physical harm as might exist was created by unsupervised contact to the father, not by return to Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 361]

It was argued that the allegations of sexual abuse by the mother's cohabitee were of such a nature as to activate the Article 13(1)(b) exception. This was rejected by the Court. In doing this the Court noted that the Swedish authorities were aware of the case and had taken steps to ensure that the child would be protected upon her return: she would be placed in an analysis home with her mother. If the mother did not agree to this, the child would be placed in care. The Court also noted that the mother had now separated from her cohabitee.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 360]

When considering whether the allegations of the father's sexual abuse of his daughter constituted a barrier to returning the children, the Court noted that one of the objectives of the Hague Child Abduction Convention was that the forum for the determination of custody issues was not to be changed at will and that the credibility of allegations as to the personal characteristics of the petitioner were most properly investigated in the spouses' common State of habitual residence. In addition, the Court noted that a grave risk of harm did not arise if the mother were to return with the children and saw to it that their living conditions were arranged in their best interests. Accordingly, the Court found that there was no barrier to the return of the children.

Ireland
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IE 389]

The Irish Supreme Court accepted that there was prima facie evidence of sexual abuse by the father and that the children should not be returned into his care. However, it found that the trial judge had erred in concluding that this amounted to a grave risk of harm in returning the children to England per se. In the light of the undertakings given by the father, there would be no grave risk in returning the children to live in the former matrimonial home in the sole care of their mother.

- Investigation to be undertaken in the State of refuge:

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 595]

The Court of Appeal criticised the fact that the return order had been made conditional on the acts of a third party (the Swiss Central Authority) over whom China's (Hong Kong SAR) Court had neither jurisdiction nor control. The Court ruled that unless and until the allegations could be discounted altogether or after investigation could be found to have no substance, it was almost inconceivable that the trial court's discretion could reasonably and responsibly be exercised to return the child to the environment in which the alleged abuse took place.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 459]

The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that great care had to be exercised before returning a child where there existed credible evidence of the child having suffered sexual abuse. It further stated that a court should be particularly wary about using potentially unenforceable undertakings to try to protect a child in such situations.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 971]

The District Court had appointed an independent expert in paediatrics, child abuse, child sexual abuse and child pornography, to assess whether the photographs of the sons constituted child pornography and whether the behaviour problems suffered by the children were indications of sexual abuse. The expert reported that there was no evidence to suggest that the father was a paedophile, that he was sexually aroused by children, or that the pictures were pornographic. The expert approved of the German investigations and stated that they were accurate assessments and that their conclusions were consistent with their reported observations. The expert determined that the symptoms that the boys displayed were consistent with the stress in their lives caused by the acrimonious custody dispute and recommended that the boys not undergo further sexual abuse evaluation because it would increase their already-dangerous stress levels.

- Return Refused:

United Kingdom - Scotland

Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 341]

The Court held that there was a possibility that the allegations of abuse were true. It was also possible that the child, if returned, could be allowed into the unsupervised company of the alleged abuser. The Court equally noted that a court in another Hague Convention country would be able to provide adequate protection. Consequently it was possible for a child to be returned where an allegation of sexual abuse had been made. However, on the facts, the Court ruled that in light of what had happened in France during the course of the various legal proceedings, the courts there might not be able or willing to provide adequate protection for the children. Consequently, the risk amounted to a grave risk that the return of the girl would expose her to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place her in an intolerable situation.

United States of America
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 597]

Having found that sexual abuse had occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled that this rendered immaterial the father's arguments that the courts of Sweden could take ameliorative actions to prevent further harm once the children had been returned. The Court of Appeals held that in such circumstances, Article 13(1)(b) did not require separate consideration either of undertakings or of the steps which might be taken by the courts of the country of habitual residence.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Separate Representation

There is a lack of uniformity in English speaking jurisdictions with regard to separate representation for children.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
An early appellate judgment established that in keeping with the summary nature of Convention proceedings, separate representation should only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 56].

Reaffirmed by:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905].

The exceptional circumstances standard has been established in several cases, see:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].

In Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881] it was suggested by Thorpe L.J. that the bar had been raised by the Brussels II a Regulation insofar as applications for party status were concerned.

This suggestion was rejected by Baroness Hale in:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880]. Without departing from the exceptional circumstances test, she signalled the need, in the light of the new Community child abduction regime, for a re-appraisal of the way in which the views of abducted children were to be ascertained. In particular she argued for views to be sought at the outset of proceedings to avoid delays.

In Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905] Thorpe L.J. acknowledged that the bar had not been raised in applications for party status.  He rejected the suggestion that the bar had been lowered by the House of Lords in Re D.

However, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] Baroness Hale again intervened in the debate and affirmed that a directions judge should evaluate whether separate representation would add enough to the Court's understanding of the issues to justify the resultant intrusion, delay and expense which would follow.  This would suggest a more flexible test, however, she also added that children should not be given an exaggerated impression of the relevance and importance of their views and in the general run of cases party status would not be accorded.

Australia
Australia's supreme jurisdiction sought to break from an exceptional circumstances test in De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

However, the test was reinstated by the legislator in the Family Law Amendment Act 2000, see: Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

See:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
Children heard under Art 13(2) can be assisted by a lawyer (art 338-5 NCPC and art 388-1 Code Civil - the latter article specifies however that children so assisted are not conferred the status of a party to the proceedings), see:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 853].

In Scotland & New Zealand there has been a much greater willingness to allow children separate representation, see for example:

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 508];

New Zealand
K.S v.L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 532].

Undertakings

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Enforcement of Return Orders

Where an abducting parent does not comply voluntarily the implementation of a return order will require coercive measures to be taken.  The introduction of such measures may give rise to legal and practical difficulties for the applicant.  Indeed, even where ultimately successful significant delays may result before the child's future can be adjudicated upon in the State of habitual residence.  In some extreme cases the delays encountered may be of such length that it may no longer be appropriate for a return order to be made.


Work of the Hague Conference

Considerable attention has been paid to the issue of enforcement at the Special Commissions convened to review the operation of the Hague Convention.

In the Conclusions of the Fourth Review Special Commission in March 2001 it was noted:

"Methods and speed of enforcement

3.9        Delays in enforcement of return orders, or their non-enforcement, in certain Contracting States are matters of serious concern. The Special Commission calls upon Contracting States to enforce return orders promptly and effectively.

3.10        It should be made possible for courts, when making return orders, to include provisions to ensure that the order leads to the prompt and effective return of the child.

3.11        Efforts should be made by Central Authorities, or by other competent authorities, to track the outcome of return orders and to determine in each case whether enforcement is delayed or not achieved."

See: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" and "Conclusions and Recommendations".

In preparation for the Fifth Review Special Commission in November 2006 the Permanent Bureau prepared a report entitled: "Enforcement of Orders Made Under the 1980 Convention - Towards Principles of Good Practice", Prel. Doc. No 7 of October 2006, (available on the Hague Conference website at < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Preliminary Documents").

The 2006 Special Commission encouraged support for the principles of good practice set out in the report which will serve moreover as a future Guide to Good Practice on Enforcement Issues, see: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Conclusions and Recommendations" then "Special Commission of October-November 2006"


European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

The ECrtHR has in recent years paid particular attention to the issue of the enforcement of return orders under the Hague Convention.  On several occasions it has found Contracting States to the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention have failed in their positive obligations to take all the measures that could reasonably be expected to enforce a return order.  This failure has in turn led to a breach of the applicant parent's right to respect for their family life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), see:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 941].

The Court will have regard to the circumstances of the case and the action taken by the national authorities.  A delay of 8 months between the delivery of a return order and enforcement was held not to have constituted a breach of the left behind parent's right to family life in:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 859].

The Court has dismissed challenges by parents who have argued that enforcement measures, including coercive steps, have interfered with their right to a family life, see:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 942].

The positive obligation to act when faced with the enforcement of a custody order in a non-Hague Convention child abduction case was upheld in:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 898].

However, where an applicant parent has contributed to delay this will be a relevant consideration, see as regards the enforcement of a custody order following upon an abduction:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1015].


Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact), see:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].


Case Law on Enforcement

The following are examples of cases where a return order was made but enforcement was resisted:

Belgium
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 750];

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 915];

Switzerland
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 840].

Enforcement may equally be rendered impossible because of the reaction of the children concerned, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 420];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 112];

Spain
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 899].


Enforcement of Return Orders Pending Appeal

For examples of cases where return orders have been enforced notwithstanding an appeal being pending see:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n° 11/00 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact).

Spain
Sentencia nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 907];

United States of America
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

In Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] while it is not clear whether the petition was lodged prior to the return being executed, the appeal was nevertheless allowed to proceed.

However, in Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] an appeal was not allowed to proceed once the child was returned to the State of habitual residence.

In the European Union where following the entry into force of the Brussels IIa Regulation there is now an obligation that abductions cases be dealt with in a six week time frame, the European Commission has suggested that to guarantee compliance return orders might be enforced pending appeal, see Practice Guide for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003.

Faits

Les enfants, une fille et un garçon, étaient respectivement âgés de 8 ans 1/4 et 3 ans 1/4 à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Ils avaient vécu à la fois aux Etats-Unis et en Irlande. Les parents étaient mariés et avaient conjointement la garde. Ils allèrent séparément en Irlande en janvier 1994 car le père faisait l'objet de poursuites pénales sérieuses aux Etats-Unis. Peu après, à la suite d'incidents répétés de violence domestique, la mère obtint une décision judiciaire la protégeant du père.

Les services sociaux irlandais intervinrent à partir du moment où des inquiétudes se firent jour concernant les soins prodigués aux enfants. D'autres problèmes se posèrent lorsque le père détruisit des biens qui se trouvaient au domicile conjugal. En novembre 1997, la mère et son nouveau compagnon emmenèrent les enfants aux Etats-Unis, dont la mère était originaire. Le 18 décembre 1998, la cour de district du Massachusetts ordonna le retour des enfants, à condition que des engagements soient pris.

Le 12 janvier 1999, alors que les préparatifs de retour avançaient, la soeur de la mère intenta une action tendant être autorisée à intervenir au nom des enfants. En outre, la mère et sa soeur demandèrent l'annulation de la décision du 18 décembre. La soeur de la mère allégua, entre autres, que la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif (fugitive disentitlement) s'opposait à ce que le père, qui était avait fui la justice du Massachusetts, saisisse une juridiction fédérale.

Lors d'une audience, le même jour, la cour de district autorisa la soeur de la mère à intervenir à l'instance mais uniquement sur la question de la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif, en ce qu'elle s'opposerait à l'exercice par le père d'une action en justice. Le 11 juin 1999, le juge de District rejeta la demande d'annulation. Il sursit toutefois à l'exécution de sa décision en attendant que la cour d'appel statue. La mère et la soeur interjetèrent appel de la décision ordonnant le retour et de la décision limitant le domaine d'intervention de la soeur.

Le père forma un recours reconventionnel contre la décision autorisant la soeur à intervenir et la décision autorisant le sursis à l'exécution.

Dispositif

Appel de la mère accueilli; déplacement illicite mais retour refusé ; les conditions de l'article 13(1)(b) étaient remplies. La cour considéra qu'il était fort probable que le père viole ses engagement et, en conséquence, que les enfants soient confrontés à un risque grave.

Commentaire INCADAT

Pour un résumé de la décision de la juridiction du Massachusetts du 18 December 1998, voy. : [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 222].

Objectifs de la Convention

Les juridictions de tous les États contractants doivent inévitablement se référer aux objectifs de la Convention et les évaluer si elles veulent comprendre le but de cet instrument et être ainsi guidées quant à la manière d'interpréter ses notions et d'appliquer ses dispositions.

La Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants comprend explicitement et implicitement toute une série de buts et d'objectifs, positifs et négatifs, car elle cherche à établir un équilibre délicat entre les intérêts concurrents des principaux acteurs : l'enfant, le parent délaissé et le parent ravisseur. Voir, par exemple, le débat sur cette question dans la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 17].

L'article 1 identifie les principaux objectifs, à savoir que la Convention a pour objet :
a) d'assurer le retour immédiat des enfants déplacés ou retenus illicitement dans tout État contractant et
b) de faire respecter effectivement dans les autres États contractants les droits de garde et de visite existant dans un État contractant.

De plus amples détails sont fournis dans le préambule, notamment au sujet de l'objectif premier d'obtenir le retour des enfants, lorsque leur déplacement ou leur rétention a donné lieu à une violation des droits de garde effectivement exercés.  Il y est indiqué que :

L'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ;

Et les États signataires désirant :
protéger l'enfant, sur le plan international, contre tous les effets nuisibles d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour illicites et établir des procédures en vue de garantir le retour immédiat de l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle et d'assurer la protection du droit de visite.

L'objectif du retour et la manière dont il doit s'effectuer au mieux sont également renforcés dans les articles suivants, notamment en ce qui concerne les obligations des Autorités centrales (art. 8 à 10) et l'obligation faite aux autorités judiciaires de procéder d'urgence (art. 11).

L'article 13, avec les articles 12(2) et 20, qui énonce les exceptions au mécanisme de retour sommaire, indique que la Convention comporte un objectif supplémentaire, à savoir que dans certaines circonstances définies, la situation propre à chaque enfant devrait être prise en compte, notamment l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant ou même du parent ayant emmené l'enfant. 

Le rapport explicatif de Mme Pérez-Vera attire l'attention au paragraphe 9 sur un objectif implicite sur lequel repose la Convention, à savoir que l'examen au fond des questions relatives aux droits de garde doit se faire par les autorités compétentes de l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle avant d'être déplacé, voir par exemple :

Argentine
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 362];

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 January 2007, No 06/002739, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

Israël
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 214];

Pays-Bas
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 316];

Suisse
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125].

Le rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera associe également la dimension préventive à l'objectif de retour de l'instrument (para. 17, 18 et 25), un objectif dont il a beaucoup été question pendant le processus de ratification de la Convention aux États-Unis d'Amérique (voir : Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) et sur lequel des juges se sont fondés dans cet État contractant dans leur application de la Convention. Voir :

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1023].

Le fait d'appliquer le principe d'« equitable tolling » lorsqu'un enfant enlevé a été dissimulé a été considéré comme cohérent avec l'objectif de la Convention de décourager l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

À l'inverse des autres instances d'appel fédérales, le tribunal du 11e ressort était prêt à interpréter un droit ne exeat comme incluant le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, étant donné que le but de la Convention de La Haye est de prévenir l'enlèvement international et que le droit ne exeat donne au parent le pouvoir de décider du pays où l'enfant prendrait résidence.

Dans d'autres juridictions, la prévention a parfois été invoquée comme facteur pertinent dans l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention. Voir par exemple :

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni  - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50].

Des buts et objectifs de la Convention peuvent également se trouver au centre de l'attention pendant la vie de l'instrument, comme la promotion du contact transfrontière, qui, selon des arguments avancés en ce sens, découlent d'une application stricte du mécanisme de retour sommaire de la Convention, voir :

Nouvelle-Zélande
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 296];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60].

Il n'y a pas de hiérarchie entre les différents objectifs de la Convention (para. 18 du rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera). L'interprétation judiciaire peut ainsi diverger selon les États contractants en fonction de l'accent plus ou moins important qui sera placé sur certains objectifs. La jurisprudence peut également évoluer, sur le plan interne ou international.

Dans la jurisprudence britannique du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), une décision de l'instance suprême de cette juridiction, la Chambre des lords, a donné lieu à une ré-évaluation des objectifs de la Convention et, partant, à un réalignement de la pratique judiciaire en ce qui concerne les exceptions :

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Précédemment, la volonté de donner effet à l'objectif premier d'encourager le retour et de prévenir ainsi un recours abusif aux exceptions, avait donné lieu à l'ajout d'un critère additionnel du « caractère exceptionnel », voir par exemple :

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

C'est ce critère du caractère exceptionnel qui fut par la suite considéré comme non fondé par la Chambre des lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, des approches différentes ont été suivies dans la jurisprudence de la Convention à l'égard de demandeurs qui n'ont pas ou n'auraient pas respecté une décision de justice en vertu de la « doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif ».

Dans Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 150], la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif a été appliquée, le père demandeur ayant fui les États-Unis pour échapper à sa condamnation pénale et d'autres responsabilités devant des tribunaux américains.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. 2000), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 326].

Dans l'espèce, le père était un fugitif. Deuxièmement, on pouvait soutenir qu'il y avait un lien entre son statut de fugitif et la demande. Mais la juridiction conclut que le lien n'était pas assez fort pour que la doctrine ait à s'appliquer. En tout état de cause, la juridiction estima également que le fait d'appliquer la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif imposerait une sanction trop sévère dans une affaire de droits parentaux.

Dans March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 386], la doctrine n'a pas été appliquée pour ce qui est du non-respect par le demandeur d'ordonnances civiles.

Dans l'affaire canadienne Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 760], le statut de fugitif du père a été considéré comme un facteur à prendre en compte, en ce sens qu'il y avait là un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant.

Nature limitée des exceptions

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Allégations de mauvais traitement et abus sexuel

Les tribunaux ont adopté des positions variables lorsqu'ils ont été confrontés à des allégations selon lesquelles le parent délaissé avait fait subir des mauvais traitements ou abus sexuels à l'enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement. Dans les affaires les plus simples, les accusations ont pu être rejetées comme non fondées. Lorsqu'il n'était pas évident que l'allégation était manifestement non fondée, les tribunaux se sont montrés divisés quant à savoir si une enquête poussée devait être menée dans l'État de refuge ou bien dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, auquel cas des mesures de protection provisoires seraient prises en vue de protéger l'enfant en cas de retour.

- Accusations déclarées non fondées :

Belgique

Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 706]

Le père prétendait que la mère ne voulait le retour de l'enfant que pour la faire déclarer folle et vendre ses organes. Toutefois, le juge releva que si les déclarations du père relevaient d'une profonde conviction, elles n'étaient pas étayées d'éléments de preuve.

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 666]

La Cour décida que si la mère avait eu des craintes sérieuses à propos de son fils, elle ne l'aurait pas laissé aux soins du père pendant les vacances, après ce qu'elle présentait comme un incident sérieux.

J.M. c. H.A., Droit de la famille, N°500-04-046027-075 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 968]

La mère faisait valoir un risque grave au motif que le père était un prédateur sexuel. La Cour rappela que toutes les procédures étrangères avaient rejeté ces allégations, et indiqua qu'il fallait garder en mémoire que la question posée était celle du retour et non de la garde. Elle constata que les craintes de la mère et de ses parents étaient largement irraisonnées, et que la preuve de la corruption des autorités judiciaires de l'État de résidence habituelle n'était pas davantage rapportée. La Cour exprima au contraire une crainte face à la réaction de la famille de la mère (rappelant qu'ils avaient enlevé l'enfant en dépit de 3 interdictions judiciaires de ce faire), ainsi qu'une critique concernant les capacités mentales de la mère, qui avait maintenu l'enfant dans un climat de peur de son père.

France
CA Amiens 4 mars 1998, n° RG 5704759 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 704]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation de violence physique du père à l'égard de l'enfant. S'il pouvait y avoir eu des épisodes violents, ils n'étaient pas de nature à caractériser le risque nécessaire à l'application de l'article 13(1)(b).

Nouvelle Zélande
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 303]

La Cour rejeta l'allégation selon laquelle les habitudes sexuelles du père étaient de nature à causer un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant. Elle ajouta que la preuve n'avait pas été apportée que le retour exposerait l'enfant à un risque tel que l'article 13(1)(b) serait applicable.

Suisse
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (Cour d'appel du canton de Zurich) (Suisse), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 426]

La mère prétendait que le père constituait un danger pour les enfants parce qu'il avait entre autres abusé sexuellement de l'enfant. Pour rejeter cet argument, la Cour fit observer que la mère avait jusqu'alors laissé l'enfant vivre seul avec son père pendant qu'elle voyageait à l'étranger.

Retour ordonné et enquête à mener dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 19]

Le risque encouru par l'enfant devait faire l'objet d'une enquête dans le cadre de la procédure de garde en cours en Australie.  Il convenait de protéger l'enfant jusqu'à la conclusion de cette enquête. Toutefois cette nécessité de protection ne devait pas mener au rejet de la demande de retour car le risque était lié non pas au retour en Australie mais à un droit de visite et d'hébergement non surveillé.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 361]

La Cour rejeta les allégations selon lesquelles l'enfant était victime d'abus sexuels de la part du concubin de la mère de nature à déclencher le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b). Pour rejeter l'application de l'article 13(1)(b), la Cour avait relevé que les autorités suédoises étaient conscientes de ce risque d'abus et avaient pris des mesures précises de nature à protéger l'enfant à son retour : elle serait placée dans un foyer d'analyse avec sa mère. Si la mère refusait, alors l'enfant serait ôtée à sa famille et placée dans un foyer. Elle fit également remarquer que la mère s'était séparée de son concubin.

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland 1996:151, S96/2489 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 360]

Lors de son analyse concernant la question de savoir si l'allégation selon laquelle le père aurait abusé sexuellement de sa fille constituait une barrière au retour de l'enfant, la Cour a fait observer, d'une part, qu'un des objectifs de la Convention de La Haye était d'empêcher que le for devant se prononcer sur le retour de l'enfant soit choisi arbitrairement. La Cour observa, d'autre part, que la crédibilité des allégations devrait être analysée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle des époux car il s'agissait de l'État le mieux placé, et qu'aucun risque grave de danger n'existait si la mère accompagnait les enfants et organisait des conditions de vie dans leur meilleur intérêt. Dans ces conditions le retour pouvait être ordonné.

Irlande
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 389]

La Cour suprême irlandaise a noté qu'à première vue la preuve avait été apportée que les enfants avaient été victimes d'abus sexuels de la part du père et ne devaient pas être placés sous sa garde. Cependant, le tribunal avait estimé à tort que le retour des enfants en lui-même constituerait un risque grave. Au vu des engagements pris par le père, il n'y aurait pas de risque grave à renvoyer les enfants dans leur foyer familial sous la seule garde de la mère.

- Enquête à mener dans l'État de refuge :

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 595]

La Cour d'appel critiqua le fait que le retour était soumis à une condition sur laquelle les juridictions de la Chine (RAS Hong Kong) n'avaient aucun contrôle (ni aucune compétence). La condition posée étant l'action d'un tiers (l'Autorité centrale suisse). La Cour estima que jusqu'à ce que les allégations se révèlent dénuées de fondement, il n'était pas admissible que la cour, dans l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, décide de renvoyer l'enfant dans le milieu dans lequel les abus s'étaient produits.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir.2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 459]

La Cour d'appel du premier ressort estima que le premier juge aurait dû faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de renvoyer un enfant alors même qu'il y avait de sérieuses raisons de croire qu'il avait fait l'objet d'abus sexuels. La Cour d'appel ajouta que les juges devaient se montrer particulièrement prudents dans leur tentative de garantir la protection de l'enfant par la voie d'engagements dans des situations analogues.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 971]

Le Tribunal fédéral avait demandé à un pédiatre spécialisé dans les questions de maltraitance, d'abus sexuels sur enfants et de pédopornographie de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les photos des enfants constituaient des photos pornographiques et si les troubles comportementaux des enfants traduisaient un abus sexuel. L'expert conclut qu'aucun élément ne permettait de déduire que le père était pédophile, qu'il était attiré sexuellement par des enfants ni que les photos étaient pornographiques. Elle approuva l'enquête allemande et constata que les conclusions allemandes étaient conformes aux observations effectuées. Elle ajouta que les symptômes développés par les enfants étaient causés par le stress que la séparation très difficile des parents leur causait. Elle ajouta encore que les enfants ne devaient pas être soumis à d'autres évaluations en vue d'établir un abus sexuel car cela ne ferait qu'ajouter à leur niveau de stress déjà dangereusement élevé.

- Retour refusé :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Q., Petitioner, [2001] SLT 243, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 341]

Le juge estima qu'il était possible que les allégations d'abus fussent exactes. De même, il n'était pas impossible qu'en cas de retour, l'enfant puisse être amené à avoir un contact non surveillé avec l'auteur potentiel de ces abus. Elle observa toutefois que les autorités d'autres États parties à la Convention de La Haye sont susceptibles de fournir une protection adéquate à l'enfant. En conséquence, le retour d'un enfant pouvait être ordonné même en cas d'allégations d'abus sexuels. En l'espèce cependant, le juge estima qu'au regard des différentes procédures ouvertes en France, il semblait que les juridictions compétentes n'étaient pas en mesure de protéger l'enfant, ou pas disposées à le faire. Elle en a déduit que le retour de l'enfant l'exposerait à un risque grave de danger physique ou psychologique ou la placerait de toute autre manière dans une situation intolérable.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 597]

Ces conclusions rendaient inopérants les arguments du père selon lequel les autorités suédoises pourraient prendre des mesures pour limiter tout danger supplémentaire une fois les enfants rentrées dans ce pays. La Cour d'appel décida qu'en ces circonstances, l'application de l'article 13(1)(b) n'exigeait pas que la question des engagements du père soit posée, pas davantage que celle des mesures à prendre par les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle.

(Auteur : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - article 13(2)

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - ARTICLE 13(2)

On constate une absence d'uniformité dans les États de langue anglaise quant à la question de la représentation autonome des enfants à la procédure. 

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des décisions anciennes rendues par la Cour d'appel on considérait qu'étant donné le caractère sommaire de la procédure relative à la Convention, une représentation séparée des enfants en cause ne devait être admise que dans des cas exceptionnels.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 56] ;

Position reprise dans :

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881] ;

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905].

Le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles fut admis dans les affaires suivantes :

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 57] ;

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 180] ;

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 168] ;

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579] ;

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] ;

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964].

Dans Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881]; le juge Thorpe L.J. estima que les exigences avaient été rendues plus strictes par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis, dans la mesure où elles concernaient les demandes relatives au statut des parties.

Cette position fut rejetée par le juge Hale :

Sans toutefois remettre en cause le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles, le juge Hale de la Chambre des Lords signala dans l'affaire Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] la nécessité de revoir la manière dont la position des enfants en cause est recherchée, à la lumière des exigences du nouveau régime communautaire de l'enlèvement d'enfants. En particulier elle souligna l'importance de rechercher si l'enfant s'oppose à son retour dès le début de la procédure afin d'éviter des retards.

Dans Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905] le juge Thorpe L.J. reconnut que le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis ne rendait pas plus strictes les exigences en matière de statut des parties ; il rejeta également l'idée que Re D. assouplissait ces exigences.

Toutefois, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @937@] le juge Hale intervint de nouveau dans ce débat pour affirmer qu'un juge de la mise en état devait évaluer si une représentation autonome de l'enfant était de nature à permettre à la cour de gagner tant en compréhension que cela pourrait justifier l'intrusion, le retard et le coût qu'un tel statut entraînerait. Une telle approche semble suggérer un critère plus flexible, cependant elle ajouta également que les enfants ne doivent pas avoir une impression exagérée de l'importance et de la pertinence de leur opinion, précisant qu'en général, ceux-ci ne devraient pas intervenir en tant que parties. 

Australie
La cour suprême d'Australie a tenté de se départir du critère des circonstances exceptionnelles dans l'affaire De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93].

Toutefois, l'exigence de circonstances exceptionnelles fut rétablie par le législateur dans le cadre d'une réforme du droit de la famille en 2000. Voir : Family Law Amendment Act 2000, et Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

Voir:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
En France, les enfants entendus dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) peuvent être assistés d'un avocat (art 338-5 NCPC et art 388-1 Code Civil - cette dernière disposition précise cependant que l'audition assistée d'un avocat ne leur confère pas le statut de partie à la procédure). Voir :

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 853].

En Écosse et en Nouvelle-Zélande, on constate que les tribunaux admettent plus facilement qu'un enfant soit représenté séparément à la procédure. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @962@];

M Petitioner 2005 SLT 2, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 508];

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S v. L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 532].

Engagements

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Exécution de l'ordonnance de retour

Lorsqu'un parent ravisseur ne remet pas volontairement un enfant dont le retour a été judiciairement ordonné, l'exécution implique des mesures coercitives. L'introduction de telles mesures peut donner lieu à des difficultés juridiques et pratiques pour le demandeur. En effet, même lorsque le retour a finalement lieu, des retards considérables peuvent être intervenus avant que les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle ne statuent sur l'avenir de l'enfant. Dans certains cas exceptionnels les retards sont tels qu'il n'est plus approprié qu'un retour soit ordonné.


Travail de la Conférence de La Haye

Les Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement de la Convention de La Haye ont concentré des efforts considérables sur la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour.

Dans les conclusions de la Quatrième Commission spéciale de mars 2001, il fut noté :

« Méthodes et rapidité d'exécution des procédures

3.9       Les retards dans l'exécution des décisions de retour, ou l'inexécution de celles-ci, dans certains [É]tats contractants soulèvent de sérieuses inquiétudes. La Commission spéciale invite les [É]tats contractants à exécuter les décisions de retour sans délai et effectivement.

3.10       Lorsqu'ils rendent une décision de retour, les tribunaux devraient avoir les moyens d'inclure dans leur décision des dispositions garantissant que la décision aboutisse à un retour effectif et immédiat de l'enfant.

3.11       Les Autorités centrales ou autres autorités compétentes devraient fournir des efforts pour assurer le suivi des décisions de retour et pour déterminer dans chaque cas si l'exécution a eu lieu ou non, ou si elle a été retardée. »

Voir < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations ».

Afin de préparer la Cinquième Commission spéciale en novembre 2006, le Bureau permanent a élaboré un rapport sur « L'exécution des décisions fondées sur la Convention de La Haye de 1980 - Vers des principes de bonne pratique », Doc. prél. No 7 d'octobre 2006.

(Disponible sur le site de la Conférence à l'adresse suivante : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Documents préliminaires »).

Cette Commission spéciale souligna l'importance des principes de bonne pratique développés dans le rapport qui serviront à l'élaboration d'un futur Guide de bonnes pratiques sur les questions liées à l'exécution, voir : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations » et enfin « Commission Spéciale d'Octobre-Novembre 2006 »


Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)

Ces dernières années, la CourEDH a accordé une attention particulière à la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour fondées sur la Convention de La Haye. À plusieurs reprises elle estima que des États membres avaient failli à leur obligation positive de  prendre toutes les mesures auxquelles on pouvait raisonnablement s'attendre en vue de l'exécution, les condamnant sur le fondement de l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) sur le respect de la vie familiale. Voir :

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, 25 January 2000 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 336] ;

Sylvester v. Austria, 24 April 2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 502] ;

H.N. v. Poland, 13 September 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 811] ;                       

Karadžic v. Croatia, 15 December 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 819] ;

P.P. v. Poland, Application no. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 941].

La Cour tient compte de l'ensemble des circonstances de l'affaire et des mesures prises par les autorités nationales.  Un retard de 8 mois entre l'ordonnance de retour et son exécution a pu être considéré comme ne violant pas le droit du parent demandeur au respect de sa vie familiale dans :

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, Application n°54429/00, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 859].

La Cour a par ailleurs rejeté les requêtes de parents qui avaient soutenu que les mesures d'exécution prises, y compris les mesures coercitives, violaient le droit au respect de leur vie familiale :

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, Application n°4783/03, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 860] ;

A.B. v. Poland, Application No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 943] ;

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, Application No 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942] ;

L'obligation positive de prendre des mesures face à l'exécution d'une décision concernant le droit de garde d'un enfant a également été reconnue dans une affaire ne relevant pas de la Convention de La Haye :

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1015].


Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme

La Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme a décidé que l'exécution immédiate d'une ordonnance de retour qui avait fait l'objet d'un recours ne violait pas les articles 8, 17, 19 ni 25 de la Convention américaine relative aux Droits de l'Homme (Pacte de San José), voir :

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 772].


Jurisprudence en matière d'exécution

Dans les exemples suivants l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour s'est heurtée à des difficultés, voir :

Belgique
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 750] ;

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 915] ;

Suisse
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d’appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433] ;

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 423] ;

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 786] ;

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 840] ;

L'exécution peut également être rendue impossible en raison de la réaction des enfants en cause. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 420]

Lorsqu'un enfant a été caché pendant plusieurs années à l'issue d'une ordonnance de retour, il peut ne plus être dans son intérêt d'être l'objet d'une ordonnance de retour. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 112] ;

Espagne
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 899].

Hechos

Los menores, una niña y un varón, tenían ocho años y tres meses y tres años y tres meses restectivamente, a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Habían vivido en los Estados Unidos e Irlanda. Los padres se encontraban casados y tenían derechos de custodia compartida. Viajaron a Irlanda en forma separada en enero de 1994 ya que el padre enfrentaba graves cargos penales en los Estados Unidos. Poco tiempo después, luego de reiterados incidentes de abuso físico, la madre obtuvo una orden de protección contra el padre.

Las agencias de servicios sociales irlandesas se involucraron entonces por la preocupación en cuanto al cuidado de los niños. Más problemas surgieron cuando el padre destrozó bienes en la anterior vivienda del matrimonio. En noviembre de 1997 la madre y su nuevo novio llevaron a los niños a los Estados Unidos, el Estado de origen de la madre. El 18 de diciembre de 1998 el Tribunal de Distrito de los Estados Unidos para el Distrito de Massachusetts ordenó la restitución de los niños, sujeta a compromisos.

El 12 de enero de 1999 mientras se hacían los preparativos para la restitución, la hermana de la madre presentó un recurso para intervenir en representación de los menores. Además, tanto la madre como su hermana presentaron recursos para dejar sin efecto o anular la decisión del Tribunal de Distrito del 18 de diciembre. La hermana de la madre sostuvo, inter alia, que la doctrina de privación de derechos a fugitivos impedía al padre, un fugitivo de la justicia de Massachusetts, peticionar ante los tribunales federales.

En una audiencia el mismo día el tribunal de Distrito permitió intervenir a la hermana de la madre, pero limitando su intervención al tema de si la doctrina de privación de derechos a fugitivos impedía la petición del padre. El 11 de junio de 1999 el Tribunal de Distrito denegó el pedido. Sin embargo, suspendió la ejecución de su decisión estando pendiente la apelación. La madre y la interventora apelaron contra la orden de restitución y la decisión de limitar la intervención de esta última.

El padre también apeló contra la decisión del Tribunal de Distrito de permitir dicha intervención y la de suspender la orden de restitución.

Fallo

Se hizo lugar a la apelación de la madre, el traslado fue ilicito pero se denegó la restitución; no se había cumplido con el estándar requerido por el artículo 13(1)(b). El tribunal entendió que existía una alta probabilidad de que el padre violara los compromises asumidos y que en consecuencia, los niños permanecieran ante un grave riesgo en caso de ser restituidos.

Comentario INCADAT

Puede encontrarse una síntesis de la sentencia de primera instancia del Tribunal de Distrito de los Estados Unidos para el Distrito de Massachusetts del 18 de diciembre de 1998 en [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 222].

Objetivos del Convenio

Los órganos jurisdiccionales de todos los Estados contratantes deben inevitablemente referirse a los objetivos del Convenio y evaluarlos si pretenden comprender la finalidad del Convenio y contar con una guía sobre la manera de interpretar sus conceptos y aplicar sus disposiciones.

El Convenio de La Haya de 1980 sobre Sustracción de Menores comprende explícita e implícitamente una gran variedad de objetivos ―positivos y negativos―, ya que pretende establecer un equilibrio entre los distintos intereses de las partes principales: el menor, el padre privado del menor y el padre sustractor. Véanse, por ejemplo, las opiniones vertidas en la sentencia de la Corte Suprema de Canadá: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 17].

En el artículo 1 se identifican los objetivos principales, a saber, que la finalidad del Convenio consiste en lo siguiente:

"a) garantizar la restitución inmediata de los menores trasladados o retenidos de manera ilícita en cualquier Estado contratante;

b) velar por que los derechos de custodia y de visita vigentes en uno de los Estados contratantes se respeten en los demás Estados contratantes."

En el Preámbulo se brindan más detalles al respecto, en especial sobre el objetivo primordial de obtener la restitución del menor en los casos en que el traslado o la retención ha dado lugar a una violación de derechos de custodia ejercidos efectivamente. Reza lo siguiente:

"Los Estados signatarios del presente Convenio,

Profundamente convencidos de que los intereses del menor son de una importancia primordial para todas las cuestiones relativas a su custodia,

Deseosos de proteger al menor, en el plano internacional, de los efectos perjudiciales que podría ocasionarle un traslado o una retención ilícitos y de establecer los procedimientos que permitan garantizar la restitución inmediata del menor a un Estado en que tenga su residencia habitual, así como de asegurar la protección del derecho de visita".

El objetivo de restitución y la mejor manera de acometer su consecución se ven reforzados, asimismo, en los artículos que siguen, en especial en las obligaciones de las Autoridades Centrales (arts. 8 a 10), y en la exigencia que pesa sobre las autoridades judiciales de actuar con urgencia (art. 11).

El artículo 13, junto con los artículos 12(2) y 20, que contienen las excepciones al mecanismo de restitución inmediata, indican que el Convenio tiene otro objetivo más, a saber, que en ciertas circunstancias se puede tener en consideración la situación concreta del menor (en especial su interés superior) o incluso del padre sustractor.

El Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera dirige el foco de atención (en el párr. 19) a un objetivo no explícito sobre el que descansa el Convenio que consiste en que el debate respecto del fondo del derecho de custodia debería iniciarse ante las autoridades competentes del Estado en el que el menor tenía su residencia habitual antes del traslado. Véanse por ejemplo:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 362]

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839]

Francia
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 214]

Países Bajos

X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 316]

Suiza
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986]

Reino Unido – Escocia

N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996]

Estados Unidos de América

Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 125]

El Informe Pérez-Vera también especifica la dimensión preventiva del objetivo de restitución del Convenio (en los párrs. 17, 18 y 25), objetivo que fue destacado durante el proceso de ratificación del Convenio en los Estados Unidos (véase: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)), que ha servido de fundamento para aplicar el Convenio en ese Estado contratante. Véase:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 741]

Se ha declarado que en los casos en que un menor sustraído ha sido mantenido oculto, la aplicación del principio de suspensión del plazo de prescripción derivado del sistema de equity (equitable tolling) es coherente con el objetivo del Convenio que consiste en prevenir la sustracción de menores.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 578]

A diferencia de otros tribunales federales de apelaciones, el Tribunal del Undécimo Circuito estaba listo para interpretar que un derecho de ne exeat comprende el derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia habitual del menor, dado que el objetivo del Convenio de La Haya consiste en prevenir la sustracción internacional y que el derecho de ne exeat atribuye al progenitor la facultad de decidir el país de residencia del menor.

En otros países, la prevención ha sido invocada a veces como un factor relevante para la interpretación y la aplicación del Convenio. Véanse por ejemplo:

Canadá
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]

Los fines y objetivos del Convenio también pueden adquirir prominencia durante la vigencia del instrumento, por ejemplo, la promoción de las visitas transfronterizas, que, según los argumentos que se han postulado, surge de una aplicación estricta del mecanismo de restitución inmediata del Convenio. Véanse:

Nueva Zelanda

S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 296]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60]

No hay jerarquía entre los distintos objetivos del Convenio (párr. 18 del Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera). Por tanto, la interpretación de los tribunales puede variar de un Estado contratante a otro al adjudicar más o menos importancia a determinados objetivos. Asimismo, la doctrina puede evolucionar a nivel nacional o internacional.

En la jurisprudencia británica (Inglaterra y País de Gales), una decisión de la máxima instancia judicial de ese momento, la Cámara de los Lores, dio lugar a una revalorización de los objetivos del Convenio y, por consiguiente, a un cambio en la práctica de los tribunales con respecto a las excepciones:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Anteriormente, la voluntad de dar efecto al objetivo principal de promover el retorno y evitar que se recurra de forma abusiva a las excepciones había dado lugar a un nuevo criterio sobre el "carácter excepcional" de las circunstancias en el establecimiento de las excepciones. Véanse por ejemplo:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901]

Este criterio relativo al carácter excepcional de las circunstancias fue posteriormente declarado infundado por la Cámara de los Lores en el asunto Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

- Teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo (Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine):

En Estados Unidos la jurisprudencia ha optado por diferentes enfoques con respecto a los demandantes que no han respetado, o no habrían respetado, una resolución judicial dictada en aplicación de la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo.

En el asunto Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 150] se aplicó la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo, ya que el padre demandante había dejado los Estados Unidos para escapar de una condena penal y de otras responsabilidades ante los tribunales estadounidenses.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July25, 2000) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 326]

En este asunto el padre era un fugitivo. En segundo lugar, se podía sostener que había una conexión entre su estatus de fugitivo y la solicitud. Sin embargo, el tribunal declaró que la conexión no era lo suficientemente importante como para se pudiera aplicar la teoría. En todo caso, estimó que su aplicación impondría una sanción demasiado severa en un caso de derechos parentales.

En el asunto March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 386] no se aplicó la teoría en un caso en que el demandante no había respetado resoluciones civiles.

En un asunto en Canadá, Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 760], el estatus de fugitivo del padre fue declarado un factor a tener en cuenta, en el sentido de representar un riesgo grave para el menor.

Autor: Peter McEleavy

Carácter limitado de las excepciones

En curso de elaboración.

Alegación de comportamiento inadecuado/abuso sexual

Los tribunales han respondido de diferentes maneras al enfrentarse a alegaciones de que el padre privado del menor se ha comportado en forma inadecuada o ha abusado sexualmente de los menores víctimas de traslado o retención ilícitos. En los casos más claros, las acusaciones pueden simplemente desestimarse por resultar infundadas. Cuando ello no es posible, la opinión de los tribunales se ha dividido en cuanto a si una investigación exhaustiva debería llevarse a cabo en el Estado de refugio o si la evaluación pertinente debería efectuarse en el Estado de residencia habitual, conjuntamente con la adopción de medidas provisorias a fin de proteger al menor al momento de su restitución.

- Acusaciones desestimadas

Bélgica
Civ Liège (réf) 14 mars 2002, Ministère public c/ A [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 706]

El padre afirmaba que la madre pretendía la restitución de la menor a fin de lograr que la declararan mentalmente incapaz y de vender sus órganos. El Tribunal resolvió, sin embargo, que si bien el padre era firme en sus acusaciones, ellas carecían de sustento probatorio.

Canadá (Québec)
Droit de la famille 2675, No 200-04-003138-979 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 666]
 
El tribunal sostuvo que si la madre hubiera estado seriamente preocupada por su hijo, no lo habría dejado al cuidado del padre en vacaciones luego de lo que ella afirmaba había sido un incidente grave.

J.M. c. H.A., No500-04-046027-075 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 968]

La madre sostuvo que surgía un riesgo grave debido a que el padre era un predador sexual. El Tribunal destacó que dichas alegaciones habían sido rechazadas en procesos extranjeros. Del mismo modo, resaltaba que los procesos en aplicación del Convenio se ocupaban de la restitución del menor y no de la cuestión de la custodia. Se consideró que los temores de la madre y los abuelos maternos eran muy irracionales, y que se carecía de pruebas que acreditaran el accionar corrupto de las autoridades judiciales del Estado de residencia habitual. En cambio, el tribunal expresó su preocupación por los actos de los miembros de la familia materna (que había sustraído al menor a pesar de la existencia de tres órdenes judiciales en contrario), al igual que por el estado mental de la madre, quien había mantenido al menor en un estado de temor hacia el padre.

Francia
CA Amiens, 4 mars 1998, No de RG 5704759 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 704]

El Tribunal rechazó la alegación de violencia física contra el padre, que de haber existido, no era del nivel exigido para activar el artículo 13(1)(b).

Nueva Zelanda
Wolfe v. Wolfe [1993] NZFLR 277 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 303]

El Tribunal rechazó los argumentos de la madre según los cuales las supuestas prácticas sexuales del padre pondrían al menor en grave riesgo de daño. El Tribunal sostuvo que no había evidencia alguna de que la restitución expondría al menor al nivel de riesgo exigido para que activar la aplicación del artículo 13(1)(b).

Suiza
Obergericht des Kantons Zürich (tribunal de apelaciones del cantón de Zurich), 28/01/1997, U/NL960145/II.ZK [Referencia  INCADAT: HC/E/CH 426]

La madre alegó que el padre representaba un peligro para los menores, ya que, entre otras cosas, había abusado sexualmente de la hija. Al rechazar la acusación, el Tribunal destacó que la madre anteriormente había estado dispuesta a dejar a los menores al cuidado exclusivo del padre mientras ella viajaba al exterior.

Orden de restitución e investigación a llevarse a cabo en el Estado de residencia habitual

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
N. v. N. (Abduction: Article 13 Defence) [1995] 1 FLR 107 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 19]

El riesgo al que podía estar expuesta la hija debía investigarse en el marco del proceso de custodia en curso en Australia. Mientras tanto, la menor necesitaba protección. No obstante, tal protección no requería el rechazo de la solicitud de su restitución. El riesgo de daño físico que podía existir surgía del contacto permanente con el padre sin supervisión, y no de la restitución a Australia.

Re S. (Abduction: Return into Care) [1999] 1 FLR 843 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 361]

Se argumentó que las acusaciones de abuso sexual por parte del concubino de la madre eran de naturaleza tal como para activar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b). Este argumento fue rechazado por el Tribunal. El Tribunal señaló que las autoridades suecas habían tomado conocimiento del caso y adoptado las medidas necesarias para asegurarse de que la menor estaría protegida desde el momento de su restitución: se la colocaría en un hogar de análisis con su madre. Si la madre no estuviera de acuerdo con esto, la menor quedaría bajo la guarda del Estado. El Tribunal también señaló que para ese momento la madre se había separado de su concubino.

Finlandia
Corte Suprema de Finlandia 1996:151, S96/2489 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 360]

Al considerar si las acusaciones de abuso sexual de una hija por parte de su padre constituían una barrera para la restitución de los menores, el Tribunal destacó que uno de los objetivos del Convenio de La Haya es que el foro para la determinación de cuestiones de custodia no ha de cambiarse a voluntad, y que la credibilidad de las alegaciones respecto de las características personales del demandante sea investigada más adecuadamente en el Estado de residencia habitual en común de los esposos. Asimismo, el Tribunal destacó que no surgía un grave riesgo de daño si la madre regresaba con los menores y procuraba que sus condiciones de vida se organizaran en aras de su interés superior. En consecuencia, el Tribunal determinó que no existía barrera alguna para la restitución de los menores.

Irlanda
A.S. v. P.S. (Child Abduction) [1998] 2 IR 244 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 389]

La Corte Suprema irlandesa aceptó que existían pruebas que demostraban, prima facie, el abuso sexual por parte del padre y que las menores no debían ser restituidas a su cuidado. Sin embargo, determinó que el juez de primera instancia se había equivocado al concluir que restituir a las menores a Inglaterra representaba un riesgo grave. A la luz de los compromisos otorgados por el padre, restituir a las menores para que vivieran en el hogar anterior del matrimonio bajo el cuidado exclusivo de la madre no las expondría a ningún riesgo grave.

- Investigación en el Estado de refugio

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
D. v. G. [2001] 1179 HKCU 1 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 595]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones criticó el hecho de que la resolución de restitución había sido condicionada a los actos de una tercera parte (la Autoridad Central de Suiza) sobre la cual el tribunal de Hong Kong no tiene jurisdicción ni ejerce control. El Tribunal dictaminó que a menos que las declaraciones pudieran ser descartadas absolutamente, o que luego de la investigación dichas declaraciones no resultaran ser sustanciosas, era casi inconcebible que el tribunal de primera instancia, ejerciendo su discreción en forma razonable y responsable, decidiera restituir a la menor al ambiente en el cual el supuesto abuso había tenido lugar.

Estados Unidos de América
Danaipour v. McLarey, 286 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2002) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 459]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones para el Primer Circuito resolvió que debía tenerse extremo cuidado antes de restituir al menor cuando existían pruebas contundentes de que había sido víctima de abuso sexual. Asimismo, afirmó que todo tribunal debería ser particularmente cauteloso acerca del uso de compromisos potencialmente inexigibles para intentar proteger a un menor en tales situaciones.

Kufner v. Kufner, 519 F.3d 33 (1st Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 971]

El Tribunal de Distrito había designado a una experta independiente en pediatría, abuso de menores, abuso sexual de menores y pornografía infantil a efectos de evaluar si las fotografías de los hijos constituían pornografía infantil y si los problemas de conducta que sufrían los menores eran signos de abuso sexual. La experta informó que no había pruebas que sugirieran que el padre fuera pedófilo, que le atrajeran sexualmente los menores o que las fotografías fueran pornográficas. Aprobó las investigaciones alemanas y afirmó que constituían evaluaciones precisas y que sus conclusiones eran congruentes con sus observaciones. Determinó que los síntomas que los niños mostraban eran congruentes con el estrés de sus vidas ocasionado por la áspera batalla por su custodia. Recomendó que los niños no fueran sometidos a más evaluaciones de abuso sexual, dado que ello incrementaría sus ya peligrosos niveles de estrés.

- Restitución denegada

Reino Unido - Escocia
Q., Petitioner [2001] SLT 243 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 341]

El Tribunal sostuvo que existía una posibilidad de que las acusaciones de abuso fueran ciertas. También era posible que se permitiera, si la menor era restituida, que estuviera en compañía del supuesto abusador sin supervisión. El Tribunal igualmente observó que un tribunal de otro Estado contratante del Convenio de La Haya podría proporcionar la protección adecuada. Por consiguiente, era posible que un menor fuera restituido cuando se había hecho una acusación de abuso sexual. Sin embargo, en función de los hechos del caso, el Tribunal decidió que, a la luz de lo que había sucedido en Francia durante el curso de las distintas actuaciones legales, los tribunales del lugar posiblemente no podían o no querían brindar la protección adecuada a los menores. Por lo tanto, la restitución de la niña implicaría un grave riesgo de exponerla a daño físico o psicológico, o bien someterla a una situación intolerable.

Estados Unidos de América
Danaipour v. McLarey, 386 F.3d 289 (1st Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 597]

Luego de pronunciarse por la existencia de abuso sexual, el Tribunal de Apelaciones resolvió que ello tornaba irrelevantes los argumentos del padre según los cuales los tribunales de Suecia podían adoptar medidas atenuantes a fin de impedir mayores daños luego de la restitución de los menores. El Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que, en dichas circunstancias, el artículo 13(1)(b) no requería la consideración por separado ni de los compromisos ni de las medidas que los tribunales del país de residencia habitual podrían adoptar.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Representación separada

Existe falta de uniformidad en las jurisdicciones de habla inglesa con respecto a la representación separada de los menores.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Una temprana sentencia de apelación estableció que congruentemente con la naturaleza sumaria de los procedimientos del Convenio, la representación separada solo debería permitirse en circunstancias excepcionales.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 56].

Confirmado en:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 905].

El estándar de las circunstancias excepcionales ha sido establecido en varios casos. Véanse:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 964].

En Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 881], Lord Justice Thorpe sugirió que las exigencias se habían vuelto más estrictas con el Reglamento Bruselas II bis en lo que respecta a solicitudes de calidad de parte.

Esta sugerencia fue refutada por la Baronesa Hale en:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880]. Sin apartarse del criterio de las circunstancias excepcionales, señaló la necesidad, a la luz del nuevo régimen de sustracción de menores de la Comunidad, de volver a sopesar el modo en que las opiniones de los menores sustraídos habrían de determinarse. En particular, advirtió la necesidad de buscar las opiniones al comienzo del proceso a fin de evitar demoras.

En Re F (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 905], Lord Justice Thorpe reconoció que las exigencias no se habían vuelto más estrictas en lo que respecta a las solicitudes de calidad de parte. Rechazó la sugerencia de que la Cámara de los Lores, en Re D., hubiera bajado las exigencias.

Sin embargo, en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937], la Baronesa Hale intervino una vez más en el debate y afirmó que un juez de instrucción debería evaluar si la representación separada aportaría lo suficiente a la comprensión del Tribunal para justificar la intrusión, la demora y los gastos ocasionados. Esto sugeriría un criterio más flexible; sin embargo, agregó asimismo que no debería darse a los menores una impresión exagerada de la relevancia e importancia de sus opiniones y, en general, no se les otorgaría la calidad de parte.

Australia
La máxima instancia de Australia intentó apartarse del criterio de las circunstancias excepcionales en De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

No obstante, el criterio fue restablecido por el legislador en la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000). Véase: Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975), art. 68L.

Véase:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Referencia INCADAT : HC/E/AU 1106].

Francia
Los menores escuchados en virtud del art. 13(2) pueden contar con la asistencia de un abogado (art. 338-5 NCPC y art. 388-1 Code Civil - el último artículo aclara, sin embargo, que a los menores que contaran con dicha asistencia no se les confiere la calidad de parte en el proceso). Véase:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 853].

En Escocia y Nueva Zelanda, ha habido mucha mayor voluntad en el sentido de permitir la representación separada de los menores. Véanse, por ejemplo:

Reino Unido - Escocia
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 508];

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 532].

Compromisos

Preparación del análisis de jurisprudencia de INCADAT en curso.

Ejecución de órdenes de restitución

el caso de que un padre sustractor no cumpla voluntariamente, la implementación de la orden de restitución requerirá medidas coercitivas. La adopción de dichas medidas puede acarrear complicaciones jurídicas y prácticas para el solicitante. En efecto, a pesar de ser fructíferas en última instancia, pueden dar lugar a demoras significativas antes de que se pueda determinar el futuro del menor en su estado de residencia habitual. En algunos casos extremos, es posible que las demoras acaecidas sean tan prolongadas que ya no resulte adecuado emitir una orden de restitución.


Trabajo de la Conferencia de la Haya

Se ha prestado considerable atención a la cuestión de la ejecución en las Comisiones Especiales convocadas para revisar el funcionamiento del Convenio de la Haya.

En las Conclusiones de la Cuarta Comisión Especial para la Revisión de marzo de 2001, se destacó lo siguiente:

"Métodos para acelerar la ejecución

3.9        Los retrasos en la ejecución de decisiones de restitución, o su inejecución, son cuestiones que preocupan seriamente a algunos Estados contratantes. La Comisión especial hace un llamamiento a los Estados contratantes para que ejecuten las decisiones de restitución sin demora y de forma efectiva.

3.10        Debería ser posible para los tribunales, al tomar una decisión de restitución, incluir disposiciones para garantizar que la orden lleve a una restitución del menor inmediata y efectiva.

3.11        Las Autoridades centrales, u otras autoridades competentes, deberían esforzarse en hacer el seguimiento de las decisiones de restitución y en determinar en cada caso si la ejecución se retrasa o no se consigue."


Ver: < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" y "Conclusiones y Recomendaciones".

Durante la preparación para la Quinta Comisión Especial para la Revisión de noviembre de 2006, la Oficina Permanente redactó un informe titulado: "Ejecución de las órdenes fundadas en el Convenio de La Haya de 1980 - hacia principios de buenas prácticas", Documento Preliminar, Doc. Prel. Nº 7 de octubre de 2006, (disponible en el sitio web de la Conferencia de la Haya en < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" luego "Documentos Preliminares").

La Comisión Especial de 2006 promovió el respaldo de los principios de buenas prácticas expresados en el informe, que servirían, asimismo, como una futura Guía de Buenas Prácticas sobre Cuestiones de Ejecución, ver: < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" luego "Conclusiones y Recomendaciones" luego "Comisión Especial de octubre-noviembre de 2006".


Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)

El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos le ha prestado particular atención en los últimos años a la cuestión de la ejecución de órdenes de restitución fundadas en el Convenio de la Haya. En varias ocasiones, determinó que los Estados Contratantes del Convenio de la Haya de 1980 sobre la Sustracción de Menores no habían cumplido sus obligaciones positivas de adoptar todas las medidas razonables para ejecutar las órdenes de restitución. Este incumplimiento, a su vez, dio lugar a la violación del derecho del padre solicitante al respeto de la vida familiar, garantizado por el Artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo sobre Derechos Humanos, (CEDH), ver:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 941].

El Tribunal tendrá en consideración las circunstancias del caso y las medidas adoptadas por las autoridades nacionales. Se sostuvo que una demora de ocho meses entre la entrega de la orden de restitución y la ejecución no constituía violación del derecho al respeto de la vida familiar del progenitor perjudicado:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 859].

El Tribunal no hizo lugar a objeciones de los progenitores que habían alegado que las medidas de ejecución, entre ellas, medidas coercitivas, habían interferido con su derecho al respeto de la vida familiar, ver:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 942];

En el siguiente caso, se confirmó la obligación positiva de actuar frente a la ejecución de una orden de custodia en un caso de sustracción de menores fundado en un convenio distinto al de la Haya:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Sin embargo, deberá considerarse un hecho relevante que el peticionante haya contribuido a la demora. Con relación a la ejecución de una decisión de custodia posterior a la sustracción, ver:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 1015].


Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos sostuvo que la ejecución inmediata de una orden de restitución mientras se encontraba pendiente un recurso de apelación definitivo no constituía violación de los Artículos 8, 17, 19 y 25 de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos (Pacto de San José), ver:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 772]


Jurisprudencia sobre la Ejecución

Los siguientes constituyen ejemplos de casos en los que se dictó una orden de restitución pero se objetó su ejecución:

Bélgica
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/BE 750]; 

Canadá
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 915];

Suiza
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 840].

Del mismo modo, la ejecución puede tornarse imposible por la reacción del menor en cuestión, ver:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra & Gales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 420];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 112];

España
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ES 899].


Ejecución de las decisiones de restitución cuando se encuentra pendiente la Apelación

Para ejemplos de casos en los que las órdenes de restitución fueron ejecutadas a pesar de que se encontraba pendiente la apelación, ver:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°11/00 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 772].

La Comisión Americana de Derechos Humanos ha sostenido que la ejecución inmediata de una decisión de restitución mientras se encontraba pendiente una instancia legal no viola los Artículos 8, 17, 19 o 25 de la Convención Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Pacto de San José de Costa Rica).

España
Sentencia Nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ES 907];

Estados Unidos de América
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 494].

En Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] como no estaba claro si la solicitud había sido presentada antes de la ejecución de la restitución, se consideró procedente la apelación.

Sin embargo, en Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] no se permitió que la apelación procediera una vez que el niño hubo regresado a su residencia habitual en Estados Unidos.

En la Unión Europea, luego de la entrada en vigor del Reglamento Bruselas II bis, es obligatorio que los casos de sustracción sean tramitados en el transcurso de seis semanas. La Comisión Europea ha sugerido que para garantizar el cumplimiento de las órdenes de restitución, estas sean ejecutadas aun cuando se encuentre pendiente la apelación; ver Guía Práctica para la aplicación del Reglamento del Consejo (CE) N° 2201/2003.