CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKe 168

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

High Court

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Hale J.

States involved

Requesting State

DENMARK

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Decision

Date

25 November 1997

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1997] 1 FLR 392; Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Convention Aims
Convention Aims

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Separate Representation

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children, a boy and a girl, were aged 13 and 11 1/2 respectively at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. They had lived in Denmark for seven years. The parents were divorced. The mother had care and control and the father had access.

Following a wrongful retention by the father on 17 October 1996 the High Court ordered the return of both children to Denmark. The court accepted that the boy's objections to a return were valid and should be taken into account, but it held that the children should not be separated.

On 31 October 1996 the father took the children to the airport. The boy boarded the plane, however, the girl refused to return to Denmark.

On 7 November the trial judge extended the deadline for the girl's return to 15 November 1996.

On 11 November 1996 a court welfare officer concluded that it was unrealistic to attempt a further return with the girl travelling as an unaccompanied minor.

On 12 May 1997 the mother's solicitors stated that she intended to collect the girl. On 23 May 1997 she issued an application for further directions for enforcement of the orders.

On 12 June 1997 the girl was joined as a party to the proceedings. On 16 October the Court of Appeal granted the girl leave to appeal the original decision ordering the return of her and her brother.

On 5 November 1997 the appeal was allowed. The case was remitted to the trial judge.

Ruling

Convention proceedings dismissed.

INCADAT comment

The previous hearings in this long running case are reported at: Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1997] 1 FLR 392 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 18]; Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 167].

Convention Aims

Courts in all Contracting States must inevitably make reference to and evaluate the aims of the Convention if they are to understand the purpose of the instrument, and so be guided in how its concepts should be interpreted and provisions applied.

The 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, explicitly and implicitly, embodies a range of aims and objectives, positive and negative, as it seeks to achieve a delicate balance between the competing interests of the central actors; the child, the left behind parent and the abducting parent, see for example the discussion in the decision of the Canadian Supreme Court: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 17].

Article 1 identifies the core aims, namely that the Convention seeks:
"a) to secure the prompt return of children wrongfully removed to or retained in any Contracting State; and
 b) to ensure that rights of custody and of access under the law of one Contracting State are effectively respected in the other Contracting States."

Further clarification, most notably to the primary purpose of achieving the return of children where their removal or retention has led to the breach of actually exercised rights of custody, is given in the Preamble.

Therein it is recorded that:

"the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody;

and that States signatory desire:

 to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention;

 to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence; and

 to secure protection for rights of access."

The aim of return and the manner in which it should best be achieved is equally reinforced in subsequent Articles, notably in the duties required of Central Authorities (Arts 8-10) and in the requirement for judicial authorities to act expeditiously (Art. 11).

Article 13, along with Articles 12(2) and 20, which contain the exceptions to the summary return mechanism, indicate that the Convention embodies an additional aim, namely that in certain defined circumstances regard may be paid to the specific situation, including the best interests, of the individual child or even taking parent.

The Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report draws (at para. 19) attention to an implicit aim on which the Convention rests, namely that any debate on the merits of custody rights should take place before the competent authorities in the State where the child had his habitual residence prior to its removal, see for example:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 362]
 
Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 839]

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 214]

Netherlands
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 316]

Switzerland
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 986]

United Kingdom - Scotland
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 996]

United States of America
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 125]
 
The Pérez-Vera Report equally articulates the preventive dimension to the instrument's return aim (at paras. 17, 18, 25), a goal which was specifically highlighted during the ratification process of the Convention in the United States (see: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) and which has subsequently been relied upon in that Contracting State when applying the Convention, see:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 741]

Applying the principle of equitable tolling where an abducted child had been concealed was held to be consistent with the purpose of the Convention to deter child abduction.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578]

In contrast to other federal Courts of Appeals, the 11th Circuit was prepared to interpret a ne exeat right as including the right to determine a child's place of residence since the goal of the Hague Convention was to deter international abduction and the ne exeat right provided a parent with decision-making authority regarding the child's international relocation.

In other jurisdictions, deterrence has on occasion been raised as a relevant factor in the interpretation and application of the Convention, see for example:

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 754]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 50]

Aims and objectives may equally rise to prominence during the life of the instrument, such as the promotion of transfrontier contact, which it has been submitted will arise by virtue of a strict application of the Convention's summary return mechanism, see:

New Zealand
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 296]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 60]

There is no hierarchy between the different aims of the Convention (Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report, at para. 18).  Judicial interpretation may therefore differ as between Contracting States as more or less emphasis is placed on particular objectives.  Equally jurisprudence may evolve, whether internally or internationally.

In United Kingdom case law (England and Wales) a decision of that jurisdiction's then supreme jurisdiction, the House of Lords, led to a reappraisal of the Convention's aims and consequently a re-alignment in court practice as regards the exceptions:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Previously a desire to give effect to the primary goal of promoting return and thereby preventing an over-exploitation of the exceptions, had led to an additional test of exceptionality being added to the exceptions, see for example:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 901]

It was this test of exceptionality which was subsequently held to be unwarranted by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

- Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine:

In United States Convention case law different approaches have been taken in respect of applicants who have or are alleged to have themselves breached court orders under the "fugitive disentitlement doctrine".

In Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 150], the fugitive disentitlement doctrine was applied, the applicant father in the Convention application having left the United States to escape his criminal conviction and other responsibilities to the United States courts.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 326]

In the instant case the father was a fugitive. Secondly, it was arguable there was some connection between his fugitive status and the petition. But the court found that the connection not to be strong enough to support the application of the doctrine. In any event, the court also held that applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine would impose too severe a sanction in a case involving parental rights.

In March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 386], the doctrine was not applied where the applicant was in breach of civil orders.

In the Canadian case Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 760], the father's fugitive status was held to be a factor in there being a grave risk of harm facing the child.

Author: Peter McEleavy

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Separate Representation

There is a lack of uniformity in English speaking jurisdictions with regard to separate representation for children.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
An early appellate judgment established that in keeping with the summary nature of Convention proceedings, separate representation should only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 56].

Reaffirmed by:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905].

The exceptional circumstances standard has been established in several cases, see:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].

In Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 881] it was suggested by Thorpe L.J. that the bar had been raised by the Brussels II a Regulation insofar as applications for party status were concerned.

This suggestion was rejected by Baroness Hale in:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880]. Without departing from the exceptional circumstances test, she signalled the need, in the light of the new Community child abduction regime, for a re-appraisal of the way in which the views of abducted children were to be ascertained. In particular she argued for views to be sought at the outset of proceedings to avoid delays.

In Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 905] Thorpe L.J. acknowledged that the bar had not been raised in applications for party status.  He rejected the suggestion that the bar had been lowered by the House of Lords in Re D.

However, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] Baroness Hale again intervened in the debate and affirmed that a directions judge should evaluate whether separate representation would add enough to the Court's understanding of the issues to justify the resultant intrusion, delay and expense which would follow.  This would suggest a more flexible test, however, she also added that children should not be given an exaggerated impression of the relevance and importance of their views and in the general run of cases party status would not be accorded.

Australia
Australia's supreme jurisdiction sought to break from an exceptional circumstances test in De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

However, the test was reinstated by the legislator in the Family Law Amendment Act 2000, see: Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

See:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
Children heard under Art 13(2) can be assisted by a lawyer (art 338-5 NCPC and art 388-1 Code Civil - the latter article specifies however that children so assisted are not conferred the status of a party to the proceedings), see:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 853].

In Scotland & New Zealand there has been a much greater willingness to allow children separate representation, see for example:

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 508];

New Zealand
K.S v.L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 532].

Faits

Les enfants, un garçon et une fille, étaient respectivement âgés de 13 ans et 11 ans ½ à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Ils avaient passé sept ans au Danemark. Les parents avaient divorcé. La mère disposait de la garde juridique et physique des enfants, le père avait un droit de visite.

A la suite du non-retour illicite de la part du père en date du 17 octobre 1996, la High Court ordonna le retour des deux enfants au Danemark. Cette juridiction remarqua que l'opposition au retour du garçon était valable et devait être prise en compte, mais estima que les enfants ne devaient pas être séparés.

Le 31 octobre 1996, le père emmena les enfants à l'aéroport. Le garçon monta dans l'avion, mais la fille refusa de rentrer au Danemark.

Le 7 novembre, le juge de première instance reporta la date limite du retour de la fille au Danemark au 15 novembre 1996.

Le 11 novembre 1996, un assistant social mandaté par le juge conclut qu'il était irréaliste de s'attendre à un retour effectif de la fille voyageant non accompagnée.

Le 12 mai 1997, les avocats de la mère indiquèrent qu'elle avait l'intention de reprendre la fille. Le 23 mai 1997, elle forma une demande tendant à l'exécution des jugements.

Le 12 juin 1997, la fille intervint à la procédure comme partie. Le 16 octobre, la Court of Appeal (instance d'appel) autorisa judiciairement l'enfant à interjeter appel de la décision initiale ordonnant le retour de son frère et elle.

Le 5 novembre 1997, l'appel fut accueilli. L'affaire fut renvoyée au premier juge.

Dispositif

Demande en application de la Convention rejetée.

Commentaire INCADAT

Les précédentes décisions rendues dans cette affaire sont rapportées à : Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1997] 1 FLR 392 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 18] ; Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 167].

Objectifs de la Convention

Les juridictions de tous les États contractants doivent inévitablement se référer aux objectifs de la Convention et les évaluer si elles veulent comprendre le but de cet instrument et être ainsi guidées quant à la manière d'interpréter ses notions et d'appliquer ses dispositions.

La Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants comprend explicitement et implicitement toute une série de buts et d'objectifs, positifs et négatifs, car elle cherche à établir un équilibre délicat entre les intérêts concurrents des principaux acteurs : l'enfant, le parent délaissé et le parent ravisseur. Voir, par exemple, le débat sur cette question dans la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 17].

L'article 1 identifie les principaux objectifs, à savoir que la Convention a pour objet :
a) d'assurer le retour immédiat des enfants déplacés ou retenus illicitement dans tout État contractant et
b) de faire respecter effectivement dans les autres États contractants les droits de garde et de visite existant dans un État contractant.

De plus amples détails sont fournis dans le préambule, notamment au sujet de l'objectif premier d'obtenir le retour des enfants, lorsque leur déplacement ou leur rétention a donné lieu à une violation des droits de garde effectivement exercés.  Il y est indiqué que :

L'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ;

Et les États signataires désirant :
protéger l'enfant, sur le plan international, contre tous les effets nuisibles d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour illicites et établir des procédures en vue de garantir le retour immédiat de l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle et d'assurer la protection du droit de visite.

L'objectif du retour et la manière dont il doit s'effectuer au mieux sont également renforcés dans les articles suivants, notamment en ce qui concerne les obligations des Autorités centrales (art. 8 à 10) et l'obligation faite aux autorités judiciaires de procéder d'urgence (art. 11).

L'article 13, avec les articles 12(2) et 20, qui énonce les exceptions au mécanisme de retour sommaire, indique que la Convention comporte un objectif supplémentaire, à savoir que dans certaines circonstances définies, la situation propre à chaque enfant devrait être prise en compte, notamment l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant ou même du parent ayant emmené l'enfant. 

Le rapport explicatif de Mme Pérez-Vera attire l'attention au paragraphe 9 sur un objectif implicite sur lequel repose la Convention, à savoir que l'examen au fond des questions relatives aux droits de garde doit se faire par les autorités compétentes de l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle avant d'être déplacé, voir par exemple :

Argentine
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 362];

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 January 2007, No 06/002739, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

Israël
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 214];

Pays-Bas
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 316];

Suisse
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125].

Le rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera associe également la dimension préventive à l'objectif de retour de l'instrument (para. 17, 18 et 25), un objectif dont il a beaucoup été question pendant le processus de ratification de la Convention aux États-Unis d'Amérique (voir : Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) et sur lequel des juges se sont fondés dans cet État contractant dans leur application de la Convention. Voir :

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1023].

Le fait d'appliquer le principe d'« equitable tolling » lorsqu'un enfant enlevé a été dissimulé a été considéré comme cohérent avec l'objectif de la Convention de décourager l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

À l'inverse des autres instances d'appel fédérales, le tribunal du 11e ressort était prêt à interpréter un droit ne exeat comme incluant le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, étant donné que le but de la Convention de La Haye est de prévenir l'enlèvement international et que le droit ne exeat donne au parent le pouvoir de décider du pays où l'enfant prendrait résidence.

Dans d'autres juridictions, la prévention a parfois été invoquée comme facteur pertinent dans l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention. Voir par exemple :

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni  - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50].

Des buts et objectifs de la Convention peuvent également se trouver au centre de l'attention pendant la vie de l'instrument, comme la promotion du contact transfrontière, qui, selon des arguments avancés en ce sens, découlent d'une application stricte du mécanisme de retour sommaire de la Convention, voir :

Nouvelle-Zélande
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 296];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60].

Il n'y a pas de hiérarchie entre les différents objectifs de la Convention (para. 18 du rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera). L'interprétation judiciaire peut ainsi diverger selon les États contractants en fonction de l'accent plus ou moins important qui sera placé sur certains objectifs. La jurisprudence peut également évoluer, sur le plan interne ou international.

Dans la jurisprudence britannique du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), une décision de l'instance suprême de cette juridiction, la Chambre des lords, a donné lieu à une ré-évaluation des objectifs de la Convention et, partant, à un réalignement de la pratique judiciaire en ce qui concerne les exceptions :

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Précédemment, la volonté de donner effet à l'objectif premier d'encourager le retour et de prévenir ainsi un recours abusif aux exceptions, avait donné lieu à l'ajout d'un critère additionnel du « caractère exceptionnel », voir par exemple :

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

C'est ce critère du caractère exceptionnel qui fut par la suite considéré comme non fondé par la Chambre des lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, des approches différentes ont été suivies dans la jurisprudence de la Convention à l'égard de demandeurs qui n'ont pas ou n'auraient pas respecté une décision de justice en vertu de la « doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif ».

Dans Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 150], la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif a été appliquée, le père demandeur ayant fui les États-Unis pour échapper à sa condamnation pénale et d'autres responsabilités devant des tribunaux américains.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. 2000), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 326].

Dans l'espèce, le père était un fugitif. Deuxièmement, on pouvait soutenir qu'il y avait un lien entre son statut de fugitif et la demande. Mais la juridiction conclut que le lien n'était pas assez fort pour que la doctrine ait à s'appliquer. En tout état de cause, la juridiction estima également que le fait d'appliquer la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif imposerait une sanction trop sévère dans une affaire de droits parentaux.

Dans March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 386], la doctrine n'a pas été appliquée pour ce qui est du non-respect par le demandeur d'ordonnances civiles.

Dans l'affaire canadienne Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 760], le statut de fugitif du père a été considéré comme un facteur à prendre en compte, en ce sens qu'il y avait là un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant.

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - article 13(2)

Représentation autonome de l'enfant - ARTICLE 13(2)

On constate une absence d'uniformité dans les États de langue anglaise quant à la question de la représentation autonome des enfants à la procédure. 

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des décisions anciennes rendues par la Cour d'appel on considérait qu'étant donné le caractère sommaire de la procédure relative à la Convention, une représentation séparée des enfants en cause ne devait être admise que dans des cas exceptionnels.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 56] ;

Position reprise dans :

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881] ;

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905].

Le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles fut admis dans les affaires suivantes :

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 57] ;

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 180] ;

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 168] ;

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579] ;

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] ;

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964].

Dans Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 881]; le juge Thorpe L.J. estima que les exigences avaient été rendues plus strictes par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis, dans la mesure où elles concernaient les demandes relatives au statut des parties.

Cette position fut rejetée par le juge Hale :

Sans toutefois remettre en cause le critère des circonstances exceptionnelles, le juge Hale de la Chambre des Lords signala dans l'affaire Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] la nécessité de revoir la manière dont la position des enfants en cause est recherchée, à la lumière des exigences du nouveau régime communautaire de l'enlèvement d'enfants. En particulier elle souligna l'importance de rechercher si l'enfant s'oppose à son retour dès le début de la procédure afin d'éviter des retards.

Dans Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 905] le juge Thorpe L.J. reconnut que le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis ne rendait pas plus strictes les exigences en matière de statut des parties ; il rejeta également l'idée que Re D. assouplissait ces exigences.

Toutefois, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @937@] le juge Hale intervint de nouveau dans ce débat pour affirmer qu'un juge de la mise en état devait évaluer si une représentation autonome de l'enfant était de nature à permettre à la cour de gagner tant en compréhension que cela pourrait justifier l'intrusion, le retard et le coût qu'un tel statut entraînerait. Une telle approche semble suggérer un critère plus flexible, cependant elle ajouta également que les enfants ne doivent pas avoir une impression exagérée de l'importance et de la pertinence de leur opinion, précisant qu'en général, ceux-ci ne devraient pas intervenir en tant que parties. 

Australie
La cour suprême d'Australie a tenté de se départir du critère des circonstances exceptionnelles dans l'affaire De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93].

Toutefois, l'exigence de circonstances exceptionnelles fut rétablie par le législateur dans le cadre d'une réforme du droit de la famille en 2000. Voir : Family Law Amendment Act 2000, et Family Law Act 1975, s. 68L.

Voir:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1106].

France
En France, les enfants entendus dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) peuvent être assistés d'un avocat (art 338-5 NCPC et art 388-1 Code Civil - cette dernière disposition précise cependant que l'audition assistée d'un avocat ne leur confère pas le statut de partie à la procédure). Voir :

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 853].

En Écosse et en Nouvelle-Zélande, on constate que les tribunaux admettent plus facilement qu'un enfant soit représenté séparément à la procédure. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @962@];

M Petitioner 2005 SLT 2, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 508];

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S v. L.S [2003] 3 NZLR 837, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 532].

Hechos

Los menores, un varón y una niña, tenían 13 y 11 años y medio respectivamente a la fecha de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Habían vivido en Dinamarca durante siete años. Los padres estaban divorciados. La madre tenía el cuidado y control y el padre derechos de visita.

Después de una sustracción ilícita por parte del padre, el 17 de octubre de 1996 el Tribunal Superior ordenó la restitución de ambos menores a Dinamarca. El tribunal aceptó que las objeciones del varón a un regreso eran válidas y debían ser tenidas en cuenta, pero sostuvo que los menores no debía ser separados.

El 31 de octubre de 1996 el padre llevó a los menores al aeropuerto. El varón abordó el avión, sin embargo, la menor se negó a regresar a Dinamarca.

El 7 de noviembre el juez de primera instancia extendió la fecha límite para el retorno de la menor hasta el quince de noviembre de 1996.

El 11 de noviembre de 1996 un asistente social del tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que era irrealista intentar nuevamente un regreso si la menor viajaba como menor no acompañada.

El 12 de mayo de 1997 los abogados de la madre declararon que ella deseaba ir a buscar a la menor. El 23 de mayo de 1997 emitió una solicitud para recibir más instrucciones para el cumplimiento de las decisiones.

El 12 de junio de 1997 la niña fue incluida como parte en las actuaciones. El 16 de octubre el Tribunal de Apelaciones otorgó a la niña permiso para apelar la decisión original que ordenaba el regreso de ella y de su hermano.

El 5 de noviembre de 1997 se hizo lugar a la apelación. El caso fue remitido al juez de primera instancia.

Fallo

Se desestimaron las actuaciones conforme al convenio.

Comentario INCADAT

Las audiencias anteriores en este caso a largo plazo estaban informadas en Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1997] 1 FLR 392 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 18]; Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) [1998] 1 FLR 422 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 167].

Objetivos del Convenio

Los órganos jurisdiccionales de todos los Estados contratantes deben inevitablemente referirse a los objetivos del Convenio y evaluarlos si pretenden comprender la finalidad del Convenio y contar con una guía sobre la manera de interpretar sus conceptos y aplicar sus disposiciones.

El Convenio de La Haya de 1980 sobre Sustracción de Menores comprende explícita e implícitamente una gran variedad de objetivos ―positivos y negativos―, ya que pretende establecer un equilibrio entre los distintos intereses de las partes principales: el menor, el padre privado del menor y el padre sustractor. Véanse, por ejemplo, las opiniones vertidas en la sentencia de la Corte Suprema de Canadá: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 17].

En el artículo 1 se identifican los objetivos principales, a saber, que la finalidad del Convenio consiste en lo siguiente:

"a) garantizar la restitución inmediata de los menores trasladados o retenidos de manera ilícita en cualquier Estado contratante;

b) velar por que los derechos de custodia y de visita vigentes en uno de los Estados contratantes se respeten en los demás Estados contratantes."

En el Preámbulo se brindan más detalles al respecto, en especial sobre el objetivo primordial de obtener la restitución del menor en los casos en que el traslado o la retención ha dado lugar a una violación de derechos de custodia ejercidos efectivamente. Reza lo siguiente:

"Los Estados signatarios del presente Convenio,

Profundamente convencidos de que los intereses del menor son de una importancia primordial para todas las cuestiones relativas a su custodia,

Deseosos de proteger al menor, en el plano internacional, de los efectos perjudiciales que podría ocasionarle un traslado o una retención ilícitos y de establecer los procedimientos que permitan garantizar la restitución inmediata del menor a un Estado en que tenga su residencia habitual, así como de asegurar la protección del derecho de visita".

El objetivo de restitución y la mejor manera de acometer su consecución se ven reforzados, asimismo, en los artículos que siguen, en especial en las obligaciones de las Autoridades Centrales (arts. 8 a 10), y en la exigencia que pesa sobre las autoridades judiciales de actuar con urgencia (art. 11).

El artículo 13, junto con los artículos 12(2) y 20, que contienen las excepciones al mecanismo de restitución inmediata, indican que el Convenio tiene otro objetivo más, a saber, que en ciertas circunstancias se puede tener en consideración la situación concreta del menor (en especial su interés superior) o incluso del padre sustractor.

El Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera dirige el foco de atención (en el párr. 19) a un objetivo no explícito sobre el que descansa el Convenio que consiste en que el debate respecto del fondo del derecho de custodia debería iniciarse ante las autoridades competentes del Estado en el que el menor tenía su residencia habitual antes del traslado. Véanse por ejemplo:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 362]

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839]

Francia
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 214]

Países Bajos

X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 316]

Suiza
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986]

Reino Unido – Escocia

N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996]

Estados Unidos de América

Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 125]

El Informe Pérez-Vera también especifica la dimensión preventiva del objetivo de restitución del Convenio (en los párrs. 17, 18 y 25), objetivo que fue destacado durante el proceso de ratificación del Convenio en los Estados Unidos (véase: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)), que ha servido de fundamento para aplicar el Convenio en ese Estado contratante. Véase:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 741]

Se ha declarado que en los casos en que un menor sustraído ha sido mantenido oculto, la aplicación del principio de suspensión del plazo de prescripción derivado del sistema de equity (equitable tolling) es coherente con el objetivo del Convenio que consiste en prevenir la sustracción de menores.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 578]

A diferencia de otros tribunales federales de apelaciones, el Tribunal del Undécimo Circuito estaba listo para interpretar que un derecho de ne exeat comprende el derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia habitual del menor, dado que el objetivo del Convenio de La Haya consiste en prevenir la sustracción internacional y que el derecho de ne exeat atribuye al progenitor la facultad de decidir el país de residencia del menor.

En otros países, la prevención ha sido invocada a veces como un factor relevante para la interpretación y la aplicación del Convenio. Véanse por ejemplo:

Canadá
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]

Los fines y objetivos del Convenio también pueden adquirir prominencia durante la vigencia del instrumento, por ejemplo, la promoción de las visitas transfronterizas, que, según los argumentos que se han postulado, surge de una aplicación estricta del mecanismo de restitución inmediata del Convenio. Véanse:

Nueva Zelanda

S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 296]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60]

No hay jerarquía entre los distintos objetivos del Convenio (párr. 18 del Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera). Por tanto, la interpretación de los tribunales puede variar de un Estado contratante a otro al adjudicar más o menos importancia a determinados objetivos. Asimismo, la doctrina puede evolucionar a nivel nacional o internacional.

En la jurisprudencia británica (Inglaterra y País de Gales), una decisión de la máxima instancia judicial de ese momento, la Cámara de los Lores, dio lugar a una revalorización de los objetivos del Convenio y, por consiguiente, a un cambio en la práctica de los tribunales con respecto a las excepciones:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Anteriormente, la voluntad de dar efecto al objetivo principal de promover el retorno y evitar que se recurra de forma abusiva a las excepciones había dado lugar a un nuevo criterio sobre el "carácter excepcional" de las circunstancias en el establecimiento de las excepciones. Véanse por ejemplo:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901]

Este criterio relativo al carácter excepcional de las circunstancias fue posteriormente declarado infundado por la Cámara de los Lores en el asunto Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

- Teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo (Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine):

En Estados Unidos la jurisprudencia ha optado por diferentes enfoques con respecto a los demandantes que no han respetado, o no habrían respetado, una resolución judicial dictada en aplicación de la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo.

En el asunto Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 150] se aplicó la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo, ya que el padre demandante había dejado los Estados Unidos para escapar de una condena penal y de otras responsabilidades ante los tribunales estadounidenses.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July25, 2000) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 326]

En este asunto el padre era un fugitivo. En segundo lugar, se podía sostener que había una conexión entre su estatus de fugitivo y la solicitud. Sin embargo, el tribunal declaró que la conexión no era lo suficientemente importante como para se pudiera aplicar la teoría. En todo caso, estimó que su aplicación impondría una sanción demasiado severa en un caso de derechos parentales.

En el asunto March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 386] no se aplicó la teoría en un caso en que el demandante no había respetado resoluciones civiles.

En un asunto en Canadá, Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 760], el estatus de fugitivo del padre fue declarado un factor a tener en cuenta, en el sentido de representar un riesgo grave para el menor.

Autor: Peter McEleavy

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, una reforma legislativa cambió la interpretacion posteriormente. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o simples deseos.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interés superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward planteó una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si es adecuado tener en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Inner House of the Court of Session, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto. Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Inner House of the Court of Session en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución. Véanse:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, incluso motivada, no satisfará los términos del artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, véase: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).

Representación separada

Existe falta de uniformidad en las jurisdicciones de habla inglesa con respecto a la representación separada de los menores.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Una temprana sentencia de apelación estableció que congruentemente con la naturaleza sumaria de los procedimientos del Convenio, la representación separada solo debería permitirse en circunstancias excepcionales.

Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 56].

Confirmado en:

Re H. (A Child: Child Abduction) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 881];

Re F. (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 905].

El estándar de las circunstancias excepcionales ha sido establecido en varios casos. Véanse:

Re M. (A Minor) (Abduction: Child's Objections) [1994] 2 FLR 126 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 57];

Re S. (Abduction: Children: Separate Representation) [1997] 1 FLR 486 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 180];

Re H.B. (Abduction: Children's Objections) (No. 2) [1998] 1 FLR 564 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 168];

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 579];

Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 829];

Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 964].

En Re H. (A Child) [2006] EWCA Civ 1247, [2007] 1 FLR 242, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 881], Lord Justice Thorpe sugirió que las exigencias se habían vuelto más estrictas con el Reglamento Bruselas II bis en lo que respecta a solicitudes de calidad de parte.

Esta sugerencia fue refutada por la Baronesa Hale en:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880]. Sin apartarse del criterio de las circunstancias excepcionales, señaló la necesidad, a la luz del nuevo régimen de sustracción de menores de la Comunidad, de volver a sopesar el modo en que las opiniones de los menores sustraídos habrían de determinarse. En particular, advirtió la necesidad de buscar las opiniones al comienzo del proceso a fin de evitar demoras.

En Re F (Abduction: Joinder of Child as Party) [2007] EWCA Civ 393, [2007] 2 FLR 313, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 905], Lord Justice Thorpe reconoció que las exigencias no se habían vuelto más estrictas en lo que respecta a las solicitudes de calidad de parte. Rechazó la sugerencia de que la Cámara de los Lores, en Re D., hubiera bajado las exigencias.

Sin embargo, en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937], la Baronesa Hale intervino una vez más en el debate y afirmó que un juez de instrucción debería evaluar si la representación separada aportaría lo suficiente a la comprensión del Tribunal para justificar la intrusión, la demora y los gastos ocasionados. Esto sugeriría un criterio más flexible; sin embargo, agregó asimismo que no debería darse a los menores una impresión exagerada de la relevancia e importancia de sus opiniones y, en general, no se les otorgaría la calidad de parte.

Australia
La máxima instancia de Australia intentó apartarse del criterio de las circunstancias excepcionales en De L. v. Director General, New South Wales Department of Community Services and Another, (1996) 20 Fam LR 390 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

No obstante, el criterio fue restablecido por el legislador en la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000). Véase: Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975), art. 68L.

Véase:
State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [Referencia INCADAT : HC/E/AU 1106].

Francia
Los menores escuchados en virtud del art. 13(2) pueden contar con la asistencia de un abogado (art. 338-5 NCPC y art. 388-1 Code Civil - el último artículo aclara, sin embargo, que a los menores que contaran con dicha asistencia no se les confiere la calidad de parte en el proceso). Véase:

Cass Civ 1ère 17 Octobre 2007, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 946];

Cass. Civ 1ère 14/02/2006, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 853].

En Escocia y Nueva Zelanda, ha habido mucha mayor voluntad en el sentido de permitir la representación separada de los menores. Véanse, por ejemplo:

Reino Unido - Escocia
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962];

M. Petitioner 2005 SLT 2 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804];

W. v. W. 2003 SLT 1253 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 508];

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770];

B. v. C., 24 December 2001, High Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 532].