CASE

No full text available

Case Name

H.N. v. Poland, 13 September 2005

INCADAT reference

HC/E/PL 811

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Nicolas Bratza (President); J. Casadevall, G. Bonello, R. Maruste, S. Pavlovschi, L. Garlicki, J. Borrego Borrego (Judges)

States involved

Requesting State

NORWAY

Requested State

POLAND

Decision

Date

13 September 2005

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

-

HC article(s) Relied Upon

-

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Keegan v. Ireland, judgment of 26 May 1994, Series A no. 290, p. 19; Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, § 94, ECHR 2000-I; Nuutinen v. Finland, no. 32842/96, § 127, ECHR 2000-VIII; Iglesias Gil and A.U.I. v. Spain, no. 56673/00, § 49, ECHR 2003-V; Hokkanen v. Finland, judgment of 23 September 1994, Series A no. 299-A, § 53 Nuutinen v. Finland, no. 32842/96, §128, ECHR 2000-VIII; Sylvester v. Austria, nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, § 59, 24 April 2003; Streletz, Kessler and Krenz v. Germany [GC], nos. 34044/96, 35532/97 and 44801/98, § 90, ECHR 2001-II; Al-Adsani v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 35763/97, § 55, ECHR 2001-XI; Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-VII; Humen v. Poland [GC], § 60, no. 26614/95, 15 October 1999; Johansen v. Norway, judgment of 7 August 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-III § 88.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Enforcement of Return Orders

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The application related to three children: a girl born in 1989, a boy born in 1992 and another girl born in 1994. The father was Norwegian, the mother Polish and the family had lived together in Norway. The mother also had another son born in 1980 from a previous marriage. In late 1994 the mother was committed to a psychiatric institution for more than two months. In 1998 the parents divorced and the father was granted custody, the mother access. This decision was upheld on appeal.

On 28 August 1999 the mother unilaterally took the children to Poland. On 31 August 1999 the father applied to the Polish Ministry of Justice for assistance in securing the return of the children. The Warsaw District Court was seised on 24 September. On 22 November 1999 a Polish translation of an expert opinion obtained by the Inderøy District Court (Norway) on 4 October 1999 was submitted to the Polish Ministry of Justice.

On 6 December 1999 the Warsaw District Court requested an expert opinion on the relationships between the children and their parents and on whether the return of the children to the father would lead to psychological or physical damage to the children. On 2 March 2000 the Warsaw District Court ordered the return of the children. The mother appealed. The appeal was dismissed by the Warsaw Regional Court on 4 July. During the latter hearing the mother and her lawyer declared that the children would be hidden.

On 27 July the enforcement proceedings began. The bailiff (komornik) requested the mother to return the children but she refused.

On 19 October the Warsaw District Court held the first hearing in the enforcement proceedings. On 23 October the father lodged a petition with the European Court of Human Rights claiming a breach of his Convention rights by the Polish government. On 23 November the Warsaw District Court adjourned the hearing as it considered that it was necessary to hear both parties to the proceedings.

On 8 January 2001 the Warsaw District Court ordered the mother to return the children to the father within seven days. It also decided that if she did not comply with the order she would be punished with a 1,000 Polish zlotys fine or a ten-day prison term in default. The court also ordered the bailiff to take the children away from the mother by force if they were not returned within seven days.

The mother appealed this decision but the appeal was dismissed by the Warsaw Regional Court on 6 March 2001.

On 2 April 2001 the bailiff sent to the District Committee for the Protection of the Rights of the Child in Warsaw a written request for their assistance in the enforcement of the District Court's order to take the children away from the mother by force. The request noted that the bailiff would enforce the court's order on 19 April 2001 at 1 p.m. at the mother's house in Warsaw. On that date neither the mother nor the children were present at the house.

On 31 August 2001 the Norwegian Central Authority submitted to its Polish counterpart details of the mother's bank account held in Warsaw into which she was receiving her pension from Norway.

On 19 December 2001 the Polish Central Authority informed its Norwegian counterpart that details of the mother's bank account had been passed to the prosecution service, which was investigating this lead. On 14 December 2001 the Warsaw District Court allowed an application lodged by the father's lawyer and decided that a guardian should take the children away from the mother when her address was established.

On 9 July 2002 the father was informed by his step-son that the eldest daughter was staying with a maternal aunt in Warsaw. This child was returned to Norway the next day. In the autumn of 2002 the Warsaw District Court began investigations into where the children were receiving their schooling. In January 2003 the court asked the Social Security Board where the mother was collecting her pension.

On 17 February 2003 the Warsaw District Prosecutor informed the Warsaw District Court that the mother had been arrested in Bialystok, Poland several months before. On 28 February the mother was charged with the forgery of documents. On 16 April the remaining two children were returned to Norway. On 17 February 2004 the father's application to the ECHR was declared admissible.

Ruling

In an unanimous ruling the Court held that Poland had breached Article 8 of the ECHR in failing to make adequate and effective efforts to enforce the return order. Furthermore the length of the proceedings exceeded a reasonable time and accordingly there was also a breach of Article 6(1) of the ECHR. The Court also made an award of compensation to the father under Article 41 of the ECHR.

INCADAT comment

Enforcement of Return Orders

Where an abducting parent does not comply voluntarily the implementation of a return order will require coercive measures to be taken.  The introduction of such measures may give rise to legal and practical difficulties for the applicant.  Indeed, even where ultimately successful significant delays may result before the child's future can be adjudicated upon in the State of habitual residence.  In some extreme cases the delays encountered may be of such length that it may no longer be appropriate for a return order to be made.


Work of the Hague Conference

Considerable attention has been paid to the issue of enforcement at the Special Commissions convened to review the operation of the Hague Convention.

In the Conclusions of the Fourth Review Special Commission in March 2001 it was noted:

"Methods and speed of enforcement

3.9        Delays in enforcement of return orders, or their non-enforcement, in certain Contracting States are matters of serious concern. The Special Commission calls upon Contracting States to enforce return orders promptly and effectively.

3.10        It should be made possible for courts, when making return orders, to include provisions to ensure that the order leads to the prompt and effective return of the child.

3.11        Efforts should be made by Central Authorities, or by other competent authorities, to track the outcome of return orders and to determine in each case whether enforcement is delayed or not achieved."

See: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" and "Conclusions and Recommendations".

In preparation for the Fifth Review Special Commission in November 2006 the Permanent Bureau prepared a report entitled: "Enforcement of Orders Made Under the 1980 Convention - Towards Principles of Good Practice", Prel. Doc. No 7 of October 2006, (available on the Hague Conference website at < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Preliminary Documents").

The 2006 Special Commission encouraged support for the principles of good practice set out in the report which will serve moreover as a future Guide to Good Practice on Enforcement Issues, see: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Conclusions and Recommendations" then "Special Commission of October-November 2006"


European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

The ECrtHR has in recent years paid particular attention to the issue of the enforcement of return orders under the Hague Convention.  On several occasions it has found Contracting States to the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention have failed in their positive obligations to take all the measures that could reasonably be expected to enforce a return order.  This failure has in turn led to a breach of the applicant parent's right to respect for their family life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), see:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 941].

The Court will have regard to the circumstances of the case and the action taken by the national authorities.  A delay of 8 months between the delivery of a return order and enforcement was held not to have constituted a breach of the left behind parent's right to family life in:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 859].

The Court has dismissed challenges by parents who have argued that enforcement measures, including coercive steps, have interfered with their right to a family life, see:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 942].

The positive obligation to act when faced with the enforcement of a custody order in a non-Hague Convention child abduction case was upheld in:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 898].

However, where an applicant parent has contributed to delay this will be a relevant consideration, see as regards the enforcement of a custody order following upon an abduction:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1015].


Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact), see:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].


Case Law on Enforcement

The following are examples of cases where a return order was made but enforcement was resisted:

Belgium
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 750];

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 915];

Switzerland
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 840].

Enforcement may equally be rendered impossible because of the reaction of the children concerned, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 420];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 112];

Spain
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 899].


Enforcement of Return Orders Pending Appeal

For examples of cases where return orders have been enforced notwithstanding an appeal being pending see:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n° 11/00 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact).

Spain
Sentencia nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 907];

United States of America
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

In Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] while it is not clear whether the petition was lodged prior to the return being executed, the appeal was nevertheless allowed to proceed.

However, in Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] an appeal was not allowed to proceed once the child was returned to the State of habitual residence.

In the European Union where following the entry into force of the Brussels IIa Regulation there is now an obligation that abductions cases be dealt with in a six week time frame, the European Commission has suggested that to guarantee compliance return orders might be enforced pending appeal, see Practice Guide for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Faits

La demande concernait trois enfants : une fille née en 1989, un garçon né en 1992 et une autre fille née en 1994. Le père était norvégien, la mère polonaise et la famille vivait ensemble en Norvège. La mère avait un fils né en 1980 d'un autre lit. Fin 1994, la mère fut internée pendant plus de 2 mois en hôpital psychiatrique. En 1998, mes parents divorcèrent ; le père obtint la garde des enfants et la mère un droit de visite. La décision fut confirmée en appel.

Le 28 août 1999, la mère emmena unilatéralement les enfants en Pologne. Le 31 août 1999, le père demanda l'assistance du Ministère de la justice polonais en vue du retour des enfants. Le juge cantonal de Varsovie fut saisi le 24 septembre. Le 22 novembre 1999, la traduction en polonais d'un rapport d'expert obtenu le 4 octobre 1999 par le juge cantonal de Inderøy (Norvège) fut transmise au Ministère polonais de la justice.

Le 6 décembre 1999, le tribunal de Varsovie demanda une expertise sur les relations entre parents et enfants et sur le point de savoir si le retour des enfants chez le père les exposerait à un danger physique ou psychologique. Le 2 mars 2000, le tribunal de Varsovie ordonna le retour des enfants. La mère interjeta appel, mais en fut déboutée par la cour régionale de Varsovie le 4 juillet suivant. Pendant cette dernière audience, la mère et son avocat indiquèrent que les enfants seraient cachés.

Le 27 juillet, une procédure d'exécution commença. Un huissier (komornik) demanda à la mère de rendre les enfants, mais celle-ci refusa.

Le 19 octobre, le tribunal cantonal de Varsovie entama la première audience relative à l'exécution de la décision de retour. Le 23 octobre, le père saisit la CEDH alléguant que le gouvernement polonais avait violé ses droits issus de la Convention. Le 23 novembre, le tribunal de Varsovie ajourna l'audience, estimant nécessaire que les deux parties soient entendues.

Le 8 janvier 2001, le même tribunal enjoigna à la mère de renvoyer sous sept jours les enfants au père. Il fut également décidé que si elle ne respectait pas cette décision, elle serait condamnée à une amende de 1000 zlotys polonais ou à un emprisonnement de 10 jours. Le tribunal ordonna également à un huissier de saisir les enfants par la force si ceux-ci n'étaient pas renvoyés par la mère dans les 7 jours.

La mère interjeta appel mais fut déboutée le 6 mars 2001.

Le 2 avril 2001, l'huissier demanda par écrit l'assistance du Comité cantonal pour la protection des droits de l'enfant de Varsovie en vue d'ôter les enfants à leur mère. Cette demande indiquait que l'huissier mettrait à exécution la décision au domicile de la mère le 19 avril suivant à 13 heures. Ce jour là ni la mère ni les enfants ne se trouvaient au domicile de la mère.

Le 31 août 2001, l'Autorité centrale norvégienne transmit à son homologue polonais les numéros de compte de la mère à Varsovie sur lequel sa pension était virée de Norvège.

Le 19 décembre 2001, l'Autorité centrale polonaise informa son homologue norvégien que ces données avaient été transmises aux autorités chargées de l'enquête. Le 14 décembre 2001, le tribunal cantonal de Varsovie accueillit la demande formée par les avocats du père et décida qu'un gardien devrait séparer les enfants de la mère dès que l'adresse de celle-ci serait établie.

Le 9 juillet 2002, le père fut informé par son beau-fils que l'aînée des enfants vivait chez une tante maternelle à Varsovie. L'enfant fut revoyée en Norvège le lendemain. A l'automne 2002, le tribunal de Varsovie commença à rechercher où les enfants étaient scolarisés. En janvier 2003, il demanda au Conseil de Sécurité sociale où la mère recevait ses allocations.

Le 17 février 2003, le procureur près du tribunal de Varsovie informa le tribunal de ce que la mère avait été arrêtée à Bialystok (Pologne) plusieurs mois plus tôt. Le 28 février, la mère fut poursuivie pour avoir falsifié des documents. Le 16 avril, les deux autres enfants furent renvoyés en Norvège. Le 17 février 2004, la requête du père fut déclarée recevable.

Dispositif

Par une décision unanime, la Cour estima que la POlogne avait violé l'article 8 de la CEDH en omettant de fournir des efforts adéquats et efficaces en vue de l'exécution de la décision de retour. En outre, la durée de la procédure était déraisonnable, de sorte que l'article 6 alinéa 1 de la CEDH était lui aussi méconnu. La cour condamna la POlogne à payer au père des dommages-intérêts en application de l'article 41.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exécution de l'ordonnance de retour

Lorsqu'un parent ravisseur ne remet pas volontairement un enfant dont le retour a été judiciairement ordonné, l'exécution implique des mesures coercitives. L'introduction de telles mesures peut donner lieu à des difficultés juridiques et pratiques pour le demandeur. En effet, même lorsque le retour a finalement lieu, des retards considérables peuvent être intervenus avant que les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle ne statuent sur l'avenir de l'enfant. Dans certains cas exceptionnels les retards sont tels qu'il n'est plus approprié qu'un retour soit ordonné.


Travail de la Conférence de La Haye

Les Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement de la Convention de La Haye ont concentré des efforts considérables sur la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour.

Dans les conclusions de la Quatrième Commission spéciale de mars 2001, il fut noté :

« Méthodes et rapidité d'exécution des procédures

3.9       Les retards dans l'exécution des décisions de retour, ou l'inexécution de celles-ci, dans certains [É]tats contractants soulèvent de sérieuses inquiétudes. La Commission spéciale invite les [É]tats contractants à exécuter les décisions de retour sans délai et effectivement.

3.10       Lorsqu'ils rendent une décision de retour, les tribunaux devraient avoir les moyens d'inclure dans leur décision des dispositions garantissant que la décision aboutisse à un retour effectif et immédiat de l'enfant.

3.11       Les Autorités centrales ou autres autorités compétentes devraient fournir des efforts pour assurer le suivi des décisions de retour et pour déterminer dans chaque cas si l'exécution a eu lieu ou non, ou si elle a été retardée. »

Voir < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations ».

Afin de préparer la Cinquième Commission spéciale en novembre 2006, le Bureau permanent a élaboré un rapport sur « L'exécution des décisions fondées sur la Convention de La Haye de 1980 - Vers des principes de bonne pratique », Doc. prél. No 7 d'octobre 2006.

(Disponible sur le site de la Conférence à l'adresse suivante : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Documents préliminaires »).

Cette Commission spéciale souligna l'importance des principes de bonne pratique développés dans le rapport qui serviront à l'élaboration d'un futur Guide de bonnes pratiques sur les questions liées à l'exécution, voir : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations » et enfin « Commission Spéciale d'Octobre-Novembre 2006 »


Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)

Ces dernières années, la CourEDH a accordé une attention particulière à la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour fondées sur la Convention de La Haye. À plusieurs reprises elle estima que des États membres avaient failli à leur obligation positive de  prendre toutes les mesures auxquelles on pouvait raisonnablement s'attendre en vue de l'exécution, les condamnant sur le fondement de l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) sur le respect de la vie familiale. Voir :

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, 25 January 2000 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 336] ;

Sylvester v. Austria, 24 April 2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 502] ;

H.N. v. Poland, 13 September 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 811] ;                       

Karadžic v. Croatia, 15 December 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 819] ;

P.P. v. Poland, Application no. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 941].

La Cour tient compte de l'ensemble des circonstances de l'affaire et des mesures prises par les autorités nationales.  Un retard de 8 mois entre l'ordonnance de retour et son exécution a pu être considéré comme ne violant pas le droit du parent demandeur au respect de sa vie familiale dans :

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, Application n°54429/00, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 859].

La Cour a par ailleurs rejeté les requêtes de parents qui avaient soutenu que les mesures d'exécution prises, y compris les mesures coercitives, violaient le droit au respect de leur vie familiale :

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, Application n°4783/03, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 860] ;

A.B. v. Poland, Application No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 943] ;

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, Application No 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942] ;

L'obligation positive de prendre des mesures face à l'exécution d'une décision concernant le droit de garde d'un enfant a également été reconnue dans une affaire ne relevant pas de la Convention de La Haye :

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1015].


Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme

La Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme a décidé que l'exécution immédiate d'une ordonnance de retour qui avait fait l'objet d'un recours ne violait pas les articles 8, 17, 19 ni 25 de la Convention américaine relative aux Droits de l'Homme (Pacte de San José), voir :

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 772].


Jurisprudence en matière d'exécution

Dans les exemples suivants l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour s'est heurtée à des difficultés, voir :

Belgique
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 750] ;

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 915] ;

Suisse
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d’appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433] ;

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 423] ;

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 786] ;

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 840] ;

L'exécution peut également être rendue impossible en raison de la réaction des enfants en cause. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 420]

Lorsqu'un enfant a été caché pendant plusieurs années à l'issue d'une ordonnance de retour, il peut ne plus être dans son intérêt d'être l'objet d'une ordonnance de retour. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 112] ;

Espagne
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 899].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Hechos

La solicitud se refería a tres menores: una niña nacida en 1989, un niño nacido en 1992 y otra niña nacida en 1994. El padre era noruego, la madre era polaca y la familia había vivido unida en Noruega. Asimismo, la madre tenía otro hijo nacido en 1980 producto de un matrimonio anterior.

A fines de 1994, la madre fue internada en una institución psiquiátrica en la que permaneció durante más de dos meses. En 1998, los padres se divorciaron y el padre obtuvo la custodia de los menores, mientras que a la madre se le otorgó el derecho de visita. Dicho fallo fue confirmado en instancia de apelación.

El 28 de agosto de 1999, la madre unilateralmente trasladó a los niños a Polonia. El 31 de agosto de 1999, el padre solicito la asistencia del Ministerio de Justicia Polaco para obtener la restitución de los niños. Se recurrió al Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia el 24 de septiembre.

El 22 de noviembre de 1999, se presentó ante el Ministerio de Justicia Polaco una traducción en idioma polaco de un dictamen pericial obtenido por el Tribunal de Distrito de Inderøy (Noruega) el 4 de octubre de 1999.

El 6 de diciembre de 1999, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia solicitó un dictamen pericial sobre las relaciones entre los niños y sus padres y de sobre la cuestión de si la restitución de los niños al padre importaría daño físico o psicológico de los menores. El 2 de marzo de 2000, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia ordenó la restitución de los niños. La madre apeló el fallo. El Tribunal Regional de Varsovia desestimó la apelación el 4 de julio. Durante dicha audiencia, la madre y su abogado declararon que los niños serían ocultados.

El 27 de julio, comenzó el proceso de ejecución. El oficial de justicia (komornik) solicitó que la madre restituyera los niños, pero ella se negó.

El 19 de octubre, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia celebró la primera audiencia en el marco del proceso de ejecución. El 23 de octubre, el padre interpuso una demanda ante la Corte Europea de Derechos Humanos invocando la violación de sus derechos en virtud del Convenio por parte del gobierno polaco. El 23 de noviembre, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia suspendió la audiencia por considerar que era necesario escuchar a ambas partes del proceso.

El 8 de enero de 2001, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia ordenó que la madre restituyera los niños al padre dentro del plazo de siete días. Resolvió, además, que si ella no cumplía con la orden, se le impondría el pago de una multa equivalente a 1.000 PLN o, en su defecto, la pena de diez días de prisión. Asimismo, el tribunal instruyó al oficial de justicia para que separara a los niños de su madre por la fuerza en el supuesto de que su restitución no se produjera en el plazo de siete días.

La madre apeló dicho fallo, pero la apelación fue desestimada por el Tribunal Regional de Varsovia el 6 de marzo de 2001.

El 2 de abril de 2001, el oficial de justicia envió al Comité de Distrito para la Protección de los Derechos del Niño una solicitud escrita de asistencia en la ejecución de la decisión del Tribunal de Distrito de separar a los niños de su madre por la fuerza. La solicitud establecía que el oficial de justicia ejecutaría la orden del tribunal el día 19 de abril de 2001 a las 13.00 en la residencia de la madre ubicada en Varsovia. En tal fecha, ni la madre ni los niños se encontraban en la casa.

El 31 de agosto de 2001, la Autoridad Central Noruega presentó ante su par polaca información acerca de la cuenta bancaria de la madre radicada en Varsovia en la cual recibía su pensión proveniente de Noruega.

El 19 de diciembre de 2001, la Autoridad Central Polaca informó a su par noruega que los detalles de la cuenta bancaria de la madre habían pasado a la fiscalía, que estaba investigando tal indicio. El 14 de diciembre de 2001, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia hizo lugar a una solicitud presentada por el abogado del padre y decidió que un tutor debería separar a los niños de su madre una vez que se hubiera establecido el domicilio de la madre.

El 9 de julio de 2002, el hijastro le comunicó al padre que la hija mayor se encontraba con una tía materna en Varsovia. La niña fue restituida a Noruega el día siguiente En otoño de 2002, el Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia inició investigaciones a fin de averiguar el lugar en el que los niños estaban recibiendo instrucción escolar. En enero de 2003, el tribunal preguntó al Instituto de Seguridad Social acerca del lugar donde la madre cobraba su pensión.

El 17 de febrero de 2003, el Fiscal de Distrito de Varsovia le informó al Tribunal de Distrito de Varsovia que la madre había sido arrestada en Bialystok, Polonia, varios meses antes. El 28 de febrero, la madre fue acusada de falsificación de documentos. El 16 de abril, los dos niños restantes fueron restituidos a Noruega. El 17 de febrero de 2004, la CEDH declaró admisible la solicitud presentada por el padre.

Fallo

En un fallo unánime, el Tribunal resolvió que Polonia había violado el Artículo 8 del CEDH por no llevar a cabo los esfuerzos adecuados y efectivos a efectos de la ejecución de la orden de restitución. Asimismo, la duración del proceso superó el plazo razonable y, por lo tanto, importó la violación del Artículo 6(1) del CEDH. El Tribunal también otorgó una compensación al padre de conformidad con el artículo 41 de dicho Convenio.

Comentario INCADAT

Ejecución de órdenes de restitución

el caso de que un padre sustractor no cumpla voluntariamente, la implementación de la orden de restitución requerirá medidas coercitivas. La adopción de dichas medidas puede acarrear complicaciones jurídicas y prácticas para el solicitante. En efecto, a pesar de ser fructíferas en última instancia, pueden dar lugar a demoras significativas antes de que se pueda determinar el futuro del menor en su estado de residencia habitual. En algunos casos extremos, es posible que las demoras acaecidas sean tan prolongadas que ya no resulte adecuado emitir una orden de restitución.


Trabajo de la Conferencia de la Haya

Se ha prestado considerable atención a la cuestión de la ejecución en las Comisiones Especiales convocadas para revisar el funcionamiento del Convenio de la Haya.

En las Conclusiones de la Cuarta Comisión Especial para la Revisión de marzo de 2001, se destacó lo siguiente:

"Métodos para acelerar la ejecución

3.9        Los retrasos en la ejecución de decisiones de restitución, o su inejecución, son cuestiones que preocupan seriamente a algunos Estados contratantes. La Comisión especial hace un llamamiento a los Estados contratantes para que ejecuten las decisiones de restitución sin demora y de forma efectiva.

3.10        Debería ser posible para los tribunales, al tomar una decisión de restitución, incluir disposiciones para garantizar que la orden lleve a una restitución del menor inmediata y efectiva.

3.11        Las Autoridades centrales, u otras autoridades competentes, deberían esforzarse en hacer el seguimiento de las decisiones de restitución y en determinar en cada caso si la ejecución se retrasa o no se consigue."


Ver: < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" y "Conclusiones y Recomendaciones".

Durante la preparación para la Quinta Comisión Especial para la Revisión de noviembre de 2006, la Oficina Permanente redactó un informe titulado: "Ejecución de las órdenes fundadas en el Convenio de La Haya de 1980 - hacia principios de buenas prácticas", Documento Preliminar, Doc. Prel. Nº 7 de octubre de 2006, (disponible en el sitio web de la Conferencia de la Haya en < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" luego "Documentos Preliminares").

La Comisión Especial de 2006 promovió el respaldo de los principios de buenas prácticas expresados en el informe, que servirían, asimismo, como una futura Guía de Buenas Prácticas sobre Cuestiones de Ejecución, ver: < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" luego "Conclusiones y Recomendaciones" luego "Comisión Especial de octubre-noviembre de 2006".


Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)

El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos le ha prestado particular atención en los últimos años a la cuestión de la ejecución de órdenes de restitución fundadas en el Convenio de la Haya. En varias ocasiones, determinó que los Estados Contratantes del Convenio de la Haya de 1980 sobre la Sustracción de Menores no habían cumplido sus obligaciones positivas de adoptar todas las medidas razonables para ejecutar las órdenes de restitución. Este incumplimiento, a su vez, dio lugar a la violación del derecho del padre solicitante al respeto de la vida familiar, garantizado por el Artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo sobre Derechos Humanos, (CEDH), ver:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 941].

El Tribunal tendrá en consideración las circunstancias del caso y las medidas adoptadas por las autoridades nacionales. Se sostuvo que una demora de ocho meses entre la entrega de la orden de restitución y la ejecución no constituía violación del derecho al respeto de la vida familiar del progenitor perjudicado:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 859].

El Tribunal no hizo lugar a objeciones de los progenitores que habían alegado que las medidas de ejecución, entre ellas, medidas coercitivas, habían interferido con su derecho al respeto de la vida familiar, ver:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 942];

En el siguiente caso, se confirmó la obligación positiva de actuar frente a la ejecución de una orden de custodia en un caso de sustracción de menores fundado en un convenio distinto al de la Haya:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Sin embargo, deberá considerarse un hecho relevante que el peticionante haya contribuido a la demora. Con relación a la ejecución de una decisión de custodia posterior a la sustracción, ver:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 1015].


Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos sostuvo que la ejecución inmediata de una orden de restitución mientras se encontraba pendiente un recurso de apelación definitivo no constituía violación de los Artículos 8, 17, 19 y 25 de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos (Pacto de San José), ver:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 772]


Jurisprudencia sobre la Ejecución

Los siguientes constituyen ejemplos de casos en los que se dictó una orden de restitución pero se objetó su ejecución:

Bélgica
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/BE 750]; 

Canadá
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 915];

Suiza
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 840].

Del mismo modo, la ejecución puede tornarse imposible por la reacción del menor en cuestión, ver:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra & Gales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 420];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 112];

España
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ES 899].


Ejecución de las decisiones de restitución cuando se encuentra pendiente la Apelación

Para ejemplos de casos en los que las órdenes de restitución fueron ejecutadas a pesar de que se encontraba pendiente la apelación, ver:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°11/00 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 772].

La Comisión Americana de Derechos Humanos ha sostenido que la ejecución inmediata de una decisión de restitución mientras se encontraba pendiente una instancia legal no viola los Artículos 8, 17, 19 o 25 de la Convención Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Pacto de San José de Costa Rica).

España
Sentencia Nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ES 907];

Estados Unidos de América
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 494].

En Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] como no estaba claro si la solicitud había sido presentada antes de la ejecución de la restitución, se consideró procedente la apelación.

Sin embargo, en Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] no se permitió que la apelación procediera una vez que el niño hubo regresado a su residencia habitual en Estados Unidos.

En la Unión Europea, luego de la entrada en vigor del Reglamento Bruselas II bis, es obligatorio que los casos de sustracción sean tramitados en el transcurso de seis semanas. La Comisión Europea ha sugerido que para garantizar el cumplimiento de las órdenes de restitución, estas sean ejecutadas aun cuando se encuentre pendiente la apelación; ver Guía Práctica para la aplicación del Reglamento del Consejo (CE) N° 2201/2003.

Fallos del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)