CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7

INCADAT reference

HC/E/RO 336

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Mme E. PALM, présidente, MM. J. CASADEVALL, GAUKUR JÖRUNDSSON, R. TÜRMEN, Mme W. THOMASSEN, M. R. MARUSTE, juges, Mme A. DICULESCU-SOVA, juge ad hoc, et de M.M. O'BOYLE, greffier de section

States involved

Requesting State

FRANCE

Requested State

ROMANIA

Decision

Date

25 January 2000

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

-

HC article(s) Relied Upon

-

Other provisions
European Convention on Human Rights
Authorities | Cases referred to
Keegan c. Irlande du 26 mai 1994, série A n° 290, p. 19, § 49; Eriksson c. Suède du 22 juin 1989, série A n° 156, pp. 26-27, § 71 ; Margareta et Roger Andersson c. Suède du 25 février 1992, série A n° 226-A, p. 30, § 91; Olsson c. Suède (n° 2) du 27 novembre 1992, série A n° 250, pp. 35-36, § 90, et Hokkanen c. Finlande du 23 septembre 1994, série A n° 299-A; McMichael c. Royaume-Uni du 24 février 1995 (série A n° 307-B, p. 55, § 87).

INCADAT comment

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Enforcement of Return Orders

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The case related to two girls, born in 1981 and 1984, to a French mother and Romanian father. On 20 December 1989 the parents divorced in France. The Tribunal de Grande Instance at Bar-le-Duc recognised a consent order entered into by the parents whereby the father was accorded parental responsibility and the mother was awarded access rights.

In 1990 the father moved to the United States of America with the girls.

The mother commenced proceedings in France because she was unable to exercise her access rights. She also petitioned that she be accorded parental responsibility. Her application was rejected at first instance, but on 28 May 1991, the Cour d'appel at Metz granted her parental responsibility and ordered that the girls reside with her. The father was granted a right of access.

The father, who had then made a home in Texas, brought custody proceedings in the Harris County Court. On 30 September 1991, in an ex parte hearing, that court awarded him custody of the girls. In December 1991 the father moved to California.

In 1992 criminal proceedings were brought against the father, in his absence, in France.

Between 1993 and 1994 the mother obtained 5 judgments in California ordering the father to hand over the girls. On 10 August 1993 the California Superior Court recognised the order of 28 May 1991 of the Cour d'appel at Metz. On 1 February 1994 the Californian Court of Appeals ruled that the Harris County Court did not have jurisdiction to amend the order of the Cour d'appel at Metz.

In March 1994 the father left the United States of America and moved with the girls to Romania.

In November 1994 the United States Central Authority issued return proceedings under the Hague Convention. A month later the French Central Authority followed suit.

On 14 December 1994 a Bucharest court ordered the return of the children. However, the father concealed the children and the judgment was not enforced. The father's home was visited several times but with no success. Criminal charges were not brought against the father.

On 1 September 1995 and 14 March 1996 the father's appeals against the return order were dismissed. A challenge by the father against the enforcement of the order was similarly rejected on 9 February 1996. At the same time as the Hague Convention proceedings were on-going the father had initiated custody proceedings in Romania.

On 5 February 1996 a Bucharest court, applying the best interest standard, granted custody to the father. This decision was appealed on the basis that the mother or her agents had not been properly served. There were a series of appeals and counter appeals ending with a decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal on 28 May 1998 whereby the judgment of 5 February 1996 was upheld.

The father equally brought proceedings in France to have his position as custodian recognised there. On 22 February 1996 the Tribunal de Grande Instance at Metz rejected this application and held that the Bucharest court did not have jurisdiction to make its order of 5 February 1996.

The mother eventually met her children, for the first time in 7 years, at their school in Bucharest on 29 January 1997. The meeting lasted 10 minutes and the girls objected strongly at having any contact. Following the meeting the mother no longer sought to have the return order enforced. In a letter dated 31 January 1997 the Romanian Central Authority informed its French counterpart that it would not order the return of the children in the light of the children's objections.

On 22 January 1996 the mother had issued an application before the European Court of Human Rights. It stated that in failing to take proper steps to enforce the various orders giving her care of the girls, in particular the return order of 14 December 1994, the Romanian authorities had breached her right to family life existing under Article 8. The mother also made an application under Article 41 for compensation.

In its report dated 9 September 1998 the Commission ruled unanimously that there had been a breach of Article 8.

Ruling

By a majority of 6 to 1 the Court ruled that Romania had breached Article 8 of the ECHR in failing to take proper steps to enforce the various orders giving the applicant mother care of the girls, in particular the return order of 14 December 1994. The Court also made an award of compensation to the mother under Article 41 of the ECHR.

INCADAT comment

Enforcement of Return Orders

Where an abducting parent does not comply voluntarily the implementation of a return order will require coercive measures to be taken.  The introduction of such measures may give rise to legal and practical difficulties for the applicant.  Indeed, even where ultimately successful significant delays may result before the child's future can be adjudicated upon in the State of habitual residence.  In some extreme cases the delays encountered may be of such length that it may no longer be appropriate for a return order to be made.


Work of the Hague Conference

Considerable attention has been paid to the issue of enforcement at the Special Commissions convened to review the operation of the Hague Convention.

In the Conclusions of the Fourth Review Special Commission in March 2001 it was noted:

"Methods and speed of enforcement

3.9        Delays in enforcement of return orders, or their non-enforcement, in certain Contracting States are matters of serious concern. The Special Commission calls upon Contracting States to enforce return orders promptly and effectively.

3.10        It should be made possible for courts, when making return orders, to include provisions to ensure that the order leads to the prompt and effective return of the child.

3.11        Efforts should be made by Central Authorities, or by other competent authorities, to track the outcome of return orders and to determine in each case whether enforcement is delayed or not achieved."

See: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" and "Conclusions and Recommendations".

In preparation for the Fifth Review Special Commission in November 2006 the Permanent Bureau prepared a report entitled: "Enforcement of Orders Made Under the 1980 Convention - Towards Principles of Good Practice", Prel. Doc. No 7 of October 2006, (available on the Hague Conference website at < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Preliminary Documents").

The 2006 Special Commission encouraged support for the principles of good practice set out in the report which will serve moreover as a future Guide to Good Practice on Enforcement Issues, see: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Conclusions and Recommendations" then "Special Commission of October-November 2006"


European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

The ECrtHR has in recent years paid particular attention to the issue of the enforcement of return orders under the Hague Convention.  On several occasions it has found Contracting States to the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention have failed in their positive obligations to take all the measures that could reasonably be expected to enforce a return order.  This failure has in turn led to a breach of the applicant parent's right to respect for their family life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), see:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 941].

The Court will have regard to the circumstances of the case and the action taken by the national authorities.  A delay of 8 months between the delivery of a return order and enforcement was held not to have constituted a breach of the left behind parent's right to family life in:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 859].

The Court has dismissed challenges by parents who have argued that enforcement measures, including coercive steps, have interfered with their right to a family life, see:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 942].

The positive obligation to act when faced with the enforcement of a custody order in a non-Hague Convention child abduction case was upheld in:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 898].

However, where an applicant parent has contributed to delay this will be a relevant consideration, see as regards the enforcement of a custody order following upon an abduction:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1015].


Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact), see:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].


Case Law on Enforcement

The following are examples of cases where a return order was made but enforcement was resisted:

Belgium
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 750];

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 915];

Switzerland
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 840].

Enforcement may equally be rendered impossible because of the reaction of the children concerned, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 420];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 112];

Spain
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 899].


Enforcement of Return Orders Pending Appeal

For examples of cases where return orders have been enforced notwithstanding an appeal being pending see:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n° 11/00 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact).

Spain
Sentencia nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 907];

United States of America
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

In Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] while it is not clear whether the petition was lodged prior to the return being executed, the appeal was nevertheless allowed to proceed.

However, in Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] an appeal was not allowed to proceed once the child was returned to the State of habitual residence.

In the European Union where following the entry into force of the Brussels IIa Regulation there is now an obligation that abductions cases be dealt with in a six week time frame, the European Commission has suggested that to guarantee compliance return orders might be enforced pending appeal, see Practice Guide for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Faits

L'affaire concernait deux filles, nées en 1981 et 1984, de mère française et de père roumain. En décembre 1989, les parents divorcèrent en France. Le Tribunal de Grande Instance de Bar-le-Duc homologua une convention passée entre les parents et aux termes de laquelle le père obtenait la responsabilité parentale, la mère disposant d'un droit de visite.

En 1990, le père s'installa aux Etats-Unis avec les enfants.

La mère entama une instance en France au motif qu'elle se trouvait dans l'impossibilité d'exercer son droit de visite. Elle demanda également la garde des enfants. Sa demande fut rejetée en première instance, mais la Cour d'appel de Metz lui donna la garde et la résidence des enfants le 28 mai 1991. Le père obtint un droit de visite.

Le père, qui s'était installé au Texas, introduisit une demande judiciaire auprès du tribunal du comté de harris. Le 30 septembre 1991, à l'issue d'une audience par défaut, ledit tribunal lui accorda la garde des enfants. En décembre 1991, le père s'installa en Californie.

En 1992, le père fit l'objet de procédures pénales par contumace, en France.

Entre 1993 et 1994, la mère obtint 5 jugements californiens ordonnant au père de lui remettre les enfants. Le 10 août 1993, un tribunal californien (California Superior Court) reconnut la décision de la Cour d'appel de Metz du 28 mai 1991. Le 1er février 1994, une cour d'appel californienne décida que le tribunal du Comté de Harris n'avait pas compétence pour remettre en cause la décision française du 28/5/1991.

En mars 1994, le père quitta les Etats-Unis et emmena les enfants en Roumanie.

En Novembre 1994, l'Autorité Centrale américaine entama une procédure conventionnelle de retour. Un mois plus tard, l'Autorité Centrale française fit de même.

Le 14 décembre 1994, un juge de Bucarest ordonna le retour des enfants. Toutefois, le père cacha les enfants et le jugement ne fut pas exécuté. Son domicile fut perquisitionné plusieurs fois sans succès. Aucune charge pénale ne fut retenue contre le père.

Le 1er septembre 1995 et le 14 mars 1996, les recours du père contre la décision de retour furent rejetés. De même, son recours visant à bloquer la mise à exécution de la décision fut rejeté le 9 février 1996. Alors que la procédure conventionnelle était pendante, le père avait entamé une instance en Roumanie, afin d'obtenir la garde des enfants.

Le 5 février 1996, la cour de Bucarest, se fondant sur le principe de la rechetche de l'intérêt supérieur des enfants, accorda la garde au père. Cette décision fit l'objet d'un recours au motif que la mère ou ses représentants n'avaient pas reçu adéquate notification. Plusieurs recours furent exercés, qui aboutirent à une décision de la Cour d'appel de Bucarest confirmant la décision du 5 février 1996.

Le père saisit également les juridictions françaises pour qu'elles confirment l'attribution de la garde. Le 22 février 1996, le tribunal de Grande Instance de Metz rejeta sa demande, estimant que la cour de Bucarest n'avait pas compétence pour rendre sa décision du 5 février 1996.

La mère rencontra les enfants, pour la première fois en sept ans, à la sortie des classes, le 29 janvier 1997, à Bucarest. La rencontre n'excéda pas 10 min et les filles s'opposèrent vivement au contact. A la suite de cette rencontre, la mère ne chercha plus à obtenir l'exécution de la décision de retour. Dans une lettre datée du 31 janvier 1997, l'Autorité Centrale roumaine informa son homologue française qu'elle n'ordonnerait pas le retour des enfants compte tenu de leur opposition.

Le 22 janvier 1996, la mère avait saisi la Cour Européenne des Droits de l'Homme d'une demande fondée sur l'idée que les autorités roumaines avaient violé son droit à une vie familiale, au sens de l'art 8 CEDH, en négligeant de prendre les mesures nécessaires à l'exécution des décisions lui accordant la garde des filles, et en particulier de la décision du 14 décembre 1994. La mère invoquait également l'article 41 de la Convention au soutien d'une demande d'indemnisation.

Dans son rapport en date du 9 septembre 1998, la Commission Européenne des Droits de l'Homme, à l'unanimité, décida qu'il y avait bien eu violation de l'article 8 CEDH.

Dispositif

Par une majorité de 6 voix contre une, la Cour estima que la Roumanie avait violé l'article 8 CEDH en négligeant de prendre les mesures nécessaires à l'exécution des décisions accordant la garde des filles à la mère, et en particulier de la décision du 14 décembre 1994. La cour accorda également une indemnisation à la mère sur le fondement de l'article 41 de la Convention.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exécution de l'ordonnance de retour

Lorsqu'un parent ravisseur ne remet pas volontairement un enfant dont le retour a été judiciairement ordonné, l'exécution implique des mesures coercitives. L'introduction de telles mesures peut donner lieu à des difficultés juridiques et pratiques pour le demandeur. En effet, même lorsque le retour a finalement lieu, des retards considérables peuvent être intervenus avant que les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle ne statuent sur l'avenir de l'enfant. Dans certains cas exceptionnels les retards sont tels qu'il n'est plus approprié qu'un retour soit ordonné.


Travail de la Conférence de La Haye

Les Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement de la Convention de La Haye ont concentré des efforts considérables sur la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour.

Dans les conclusions de la Quatrième Commission spéciale de mars 2001, il fut noté :

« Méthodes et rapidité d'exécution des procédures

3.9       Les retards dans l'exécution des décisions de retour, ou l'inexécution de celles-ci, dans certains [É]tats contractants soulèvent de sérieuses inquiétudes. La Commission spéciale invite les [É]tats contractants à exécuter les décisions de retour sans délai et effectivement.

3.10       Lorsqu'ils rendent une décision de retour, les tribunaux devraient avoir les moyens d'inclure dans leur décision des dispositions garantissant que la décision aboutisse à un retour effectif et immédiat de l'enfant.

3.11       Les Autorités centrales ou autres autorités compétentes devraient fournir des efforts pour assurer le suivi des décisions de retour et pour déterminer dans chaque cas si l'exécution a eu lieu ou non, ou si elle a été retardée. »

Voir < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations ».

Afin de préparer la Cinquième Commission spéciale en novembre 2006, le Bureau permanent a élaboré un rapport sur « L'exécution des décisions fondées sur la Convention de La Haye de 1980 - Vers des principes de bonne pratique », Doc. prél. No 7 d'octobre 2006.

(Disponible sur le site de la Conférence à l'adresse suivante : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Documents préliminaires »).

Cette Commission spéciale souligna l'importance des principes de bonne pratique développés dans le rapport qui serviront à l'élaboration d'un futur Guide de bonnes pratiques sur les questions liées à l'exécution, voir : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations » et enfin « Commission Spéciale d'Octobre-Novembre 2006 »


Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)

Ces dernières années, la CourEDH a accordé une attention particulière à la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour fondées sur la Convention de La Haye. À plusieurs reprises elle estima que des États membres avaient failli à leur obligation positive de  prendre toutes les mesures auxquelles on pouvait raisonnablement s'attendre en vue de l'exécution, les condamnant sur le fondement de l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) sur le respect de la vie familiale. Voir :

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, 25 January 2000 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 336] ;

Sylvester v. Austria, 24 April 2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 502] ;

H.N. v. Poland, 13 September 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 811] ;                       

Karadžic v. Croatia, 15 December 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 819] ;

P.P. v. Poland, Application no. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 941].

La Cour tient compte de l'ensemble des circonstances de l'affaire et des mesures prises par les autorités nationales.  Un retard de 8 mois entre l'ordonnance de retour et son exécution a pu être considéré comme ne violant pas le droit du parent demandeur au respect de sa vie familiale dans :

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, Application n°54429/00, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 859].

La Cour a par ailleurs rejeté les requêtes de parents qui avaient soutenu que les mesures d'exécution prises, y compris les mesures coercitives, violaient le droit au respect de leur vie familiale :

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, Application n°4783/03, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 860] ;

A.B. v. Poland, Application No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 943] ;

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, Application No 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942] ;

L'obligation positive de prendre des mesures face à l'exécution d'une décision concernant le droit de garde d'un enfant a également été reconnue dans une affaire ne relevant pas de la Convention de La Haye :

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1015].


Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme

La Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme a décidé que l'exécution immédiate d'une ordonnance de retour qui avait fait l'objet d'un recours ne violait pas les articles 8, 17, 19 ni 25 de la Convention américaine relative aux Droits de l'Homme (Pacte de San José), voir :

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 772].


Jurisprudence en matière d'exécution

Dans les exemples suivants l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour s'est heurtée à des difficultés, voir :

Belgique
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 750] ;

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 915] ;

Suisse
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d’appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433] ;

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 423] ;

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 786] ;

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 840] ;

L'exécution peut également être rendue impossible en raison de la réaction des enfants en cause. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 420]

Lorsqu'un enfant a été caché pendant plusieurs années à l'issue d'une ordonnance de retour, il peut ne plus être dans son intérêt d'être l'objet d'une ordonnance de retour. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 112] ;

Espagne
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 899].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Hechos

El caso se refiere a dos niñas, nacidas en 1981 y 1984, de madre francesa y padre rumano. El 20 de diciembre de 1989 los padres se divorciaron en Francia. El Tribunal de Grande Instance de Bar-le-Duc reconoció una orden de consentimiento presentada por los padres por la cual se otorgaron al padre derechos parentales y a la madre se le otorgaron derechos de visita.

En 1990 el padre se trasladó a los Estados Unidos de Norteamérica con las niñas.

La madre comenzó las actuaciones en Francia porque no podía ejercer sus derechos de visita. También solicitó que se le otorgara responsabilidad parental. Su solicitud fue rechazada en primera instancia, pero el 28 de mayo de 1991, la Cour d'appel de Metz le otorgó responsabilidad parental y decidió que las niñas residieran con ella. Se otorgó derecho de visita al padre.

El padre, quien había establecido su hogar en Texas, inició actuaciones por la custodia en el Tribunal del Condado de Harris. El 30 de septiembre de 1991, en una audiencia ex parte, el tribunal le otorgó a él la custodia de las niñas. En diciembre de 1991 el padre se mudó a California.

En 1992, se inició un proceso penal contra el padre en su ausencia, en Francia.

Entre 1993 y 1994 la madre obtuvo 5 sentencias en California que le ordenaban al padre entregar a las niñas. El 10 de agosto de 1993 el Tribunal Superior de California reconoció la orden del 28 de mayo de 1991 de la Cour d'appel de Metz. El 1 de febrero de 1994 la Cámara de Apelaciones de California falló que el Tribunal del condado de Harris no tenía jurisdicción para modificar la decisión de la Cour d'appel de Metz.

En marzo de 1994 el padre abandonó los Estados Unidos de Norteamérica y se mudó a Rumania con las niñas.

En noviembre de 1994 la Autoridad Central de los Estados Unidos emitió actuaciones de restitución conforme al Convenio de la Haya. Un mes más tarde la Autoridad Central de Francia hizo lo mismo.

El 14 de diciembre de 1994 un tribunal de Bucarest ordenó la restitución de las menores. Sin embargo, el padre ocultó a las menores y la sentencia no se pudo cumplir. El hogar del padre fue visitado en varias ocasiones sin éxito. No se inició una acción penal contra el padre.

El 1 de septiembre de 1995 y el 14 de marzo de 1996 las apelaciones del padre contra la restitución fueron desestimadas. También se rechazó una impugnación del padre en contra del cumplimiento de la orden el 9 de febrero de 1996. Al mismo tiempo, mientras las actuaciones conforme al Convenio de la Haya estaban en curso, el padre inició actuaciones por la custodia en Rumania.

El 5 de febrero de 1996, un tribunal de Bucarest, aplicando la norma del interés superior, le otorgó la custodia al padre. Esta decisión fue apelada sobre la base de que la madre o sus representantes no habían sido correctamente notificados. Hubo una serie de apelaciones y contra apelaciones que terminaron en una decisión de la Cámara de apelaciones de Bucarest el 28 de mayo de 1998 por la cual se mantuvo la sentencia del 5 de febrero de 1996.

El padre igualmente inició actuaciones en Francia para que su situación de custodia fuera reconocida allí. El 22 de febrero de 1996 el Tribunal de Grande Instance de Metz rechazó esta solicitud y sostuvo que el tribunal de Bucarest no tenía jurisdicción para emitir su orden del 5 de febrero de 1996.

La madre eventualmente se reunió con las hijas por primera vez en 7 años en su escuela de Bucarest el 29 de enero de 1997. La reunión duró 10 minutos y las hijas se opusieron enérgicamente a tener ningún contacto. Después de la reunión la madre ya no solicitó que se hiciera cumplir la orden de restitución. En una carta fechada 31 de enero de 1997, la Autoridad Central Rumana informó a su contraparte Francesa que no daría la orden de restituir las niñas a la luz de sus objeciones.

El 22 de enero de 1996 la madre presentó una solicitud ante la Corte Europea de Derechos Humanos. Declaraba que al no tomar las medidas necesarias para hacer cumplir las distintas decisiones que le otorgaban el cuidado de las niñas, en particular la orden de restitución del 14 de diciembre de 1994, las autoridades rumanas habían violado su derecho a la vida familiar previsto en el Artículo 8. La madre también solicitó una compensación conforme al Artículo 41.

En su informe del 9 de septiembre de 1998, la Comisión falló en forma unánime que se había producido una violación del Artículo 8.

Fallo

Por mayoría de 6 a 1, el Tribunal falló que Rumana había violado el Artículo 8 de la ECHR al no tomar las medidas adecuadas para hacer cumplir las distintas decisiones que otorgaban a la madre solicitante el cuidado de las niñas, en particular la orden de restitución del 14 de diciembre de 1994. El Tribunal también otorgó una compensación a la madre conforme al Artículo 41 de la ECHR.

Comentario INCADAT

Ejecución de órdenes de restitución

el caso de que un padre sustractor no cumpla voluntariamente, la implementación de la orden de restitución requerirá medidas coercitivas. La adopción de dichas medidas puede acarrear complicaciones jurídicas y prácticas para el solicitante. En efecto, a pesar de ser fructíferas en última instancia, pueden dar lugar a demoras significativas antes de que se pueda determinar el futuro del menor en su estado de residencia habitual. En algunos casos extremos, es posible que las demoras acaecidas sean tan prolongadas que ya no resulte adecuado emitir una orden de restitución.


Trabajo de la Conferencia de la Haya

Se ha prestado considerable atención a la cuestión de la ejecución en las Comisiones Especiales convocadas para revisar el funcionamiento del Convenio de la Haya.

En las Conclusiones de la Cuarta Comisión Especial para la Revisión de marzo de 2001, se destacó lo siguiente:

"Métodos para acelerar la ejecución

3.9        Los retrasos en la ejecución de decisiones de restitución, o su inejecución, son cuestiones que preocupan seriamente a algunos Estados contratantes. La Comisión especial hace un llamamiento a los Estados contratantes para que ejecuten las decisiones de restitución sin demora y de forma efectiva.

3.10        Debería ser posible para los tribunales, al tomar una decisión de restitución, incluir disposiciones para garantizar que la orden lleve a una restitución del menor inmediata y efectiva.

3.11        Las Autoridades centrales, u otras autoridades competentes, deberían esforzarse en hacer el seguimiento de las decisiones de restitución y en determinar en cada caso si la ejecución se retrasa o no se consigue."


Ver: < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" y "Conclusiones y Recomendaciones".

Durante la preparación para la Quinta Comisión Especial para la Revisión de noviembre de 2006, la Oficina Permanente redactó un informe titulado: "Ejecución de las órdenes fundadas en el Convenio de La Haya de 1980 - hacia principios de buenas prácticas", Documento Preliminar, Doc. Prel. Nº 7 de octubre de 2006, (disponible en el sitio web de la Conferencia de la Haya en < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" luego "Documentos Preliminares").

La Comisión Especial de 2006 promovió el respaldo de los principios de buenas prácticas expresados en el informe, que servirían, asimismo, como una futura Guía de Buenas Prácticas sobre Cuestiones de Ejecución, ver: < www.hcch.net >, en la "Sección de Sustracción de Menores" luego "Reuniones de la Comisión Especial respecto del funcionamiento práctico del Convenio" luego "Conclusiones y Recomendaciones" luego "Comisión Especial de octubre-noviembre de 2006".


Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)

El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos le ha prestado particular atención en los últimos años a la cuestión de la ejecución de órdenes de restitución fundadas en el Convenio de la Haya. En varias ocasiones, determinó que los Estados Contratantes del Convenio de la Haya de 1980 sobre la Sustracción de Menores no habían cumplido sus obligaciones positivas de adoptar todas las medidas razonables para ejecutar las órdenes de restitución. Este incumplimiento, a su vez, dio lugar a la violación del derecho del padre solicitante al respeto de la vida familiar, garantizado por el Artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo sobre Derechos Humanos, (CEDH), ver:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 941].

El Tribunal tendrá en consideración las circunstancias del caso y las medidas adoptadas por las autoridades nacionales. Se sostuvo que una demora de ocho meses entre la entrega de la orden de restitución y la ejecución no constituía violación del derecho al respeto de la vida familiar del progenitor perjudicado:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 859].

El Tribunal no hizo lugar a objeciones de los progenitores que habían alegado que las medidas de ejecución, entre ellas, medidas coercitivas, habían interferido con su derecho al respeto de la vida familiar, ver:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 942];

En el siguiente caso, se confirmó la obligación positiva de actuar frente a la ejecución de una orden de custodia en un caso de sustracción de menores fundado en un convenio distinto al de la Haya:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Sin embargo, deberá considerarse un hecho relevante que el peticionante haya contribuido a la demora. Con relación a la ejecución de una decisión de custodia posterior a la sustracción, ver:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 1015].


Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos sostuvo que la ejecución inmediata de una orden de restitución mientras se encontraba pendiente un recurso de apelación definitivo no constituía violación de los Artículos 8, 17, 19 y 25 de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos (Pacto de San José), ver:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 772]


Jurisprudencia sobre la Ejecución

Los siguientes constituyen ejemplos de casos en los que se dictó una orden de restitución pero se objetó su ejecución:

Bélgica
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/BE 750]; 

Canadá
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 915];

Suiza
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 840].

Del mismo modo, la ejecución puede tornarse imposible por la reacción del menor en cuestión, ver:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra & Gales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 420];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 112];

España
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ES 899].


Ejecución de las decisiones de restitución cuando se encuentra pendiente la Apelación

Para ejemplos de casos en los que las órdenes de restitución fueron ejecutadas a pesar de que se encontraba pendiente la apelación, ver:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°11/00 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 772].

La Comisión Americana de Derechos Humanos ha sostenido que la ejecución inmediata de una decisión de restitución mientras se encontraba pendiente una instancia legal no viola los Artículos 8, 17, 19 o 25 de la Convención Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Pacto de San José de Costa Rica).

España
Sentencia Nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ES 907];

Estados Unidos de América
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 494].

En Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] como no estaba claro si la solicitud había sido presentada antes de la ejecución de la restitución, se consideró procedente la apelación.

Sin embargo, en Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] no se permitió que la apelación procediera una vez que el niño hubo regresado a su residencia habitual en Estados Unidos.

En la Unión Europea, luego de la entrada en vigor del Reglamento Bruselas II bis, es obligatorio que los casos de sustracción sean tramitados en el transcurso de seis semanas. La Comisión Europea ha sugerido que para garantizar el cumplimiento de las órdenes de restitución, estas sean ejecutadas aun cuando se encuentre pendiente la apelación; ver Guía Práctica para la aplicación del Reglamento del Consejo (CE) N° 2201/2003.

Fallos del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)