CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Bajrami v. Albania (Application no. 35853/04)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/GR 898

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section)

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Nicolas Bratza (President); Giovanni Bonello, Matti Pellonpää, Kristaq Traja, Lech Garlicki, Ljiljana Mijovic, Ján Šikuta (Judges)

States involved

Requesting State

ALBANIA

Requested State

GREECE

Decision

Date

12 December 2006

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

-

HC article(s) Relied Upon

-

Other provisions
Art. 8 ECHR
Authorities | Cases referred to
Hentrich v. France, judgment of 22 September 1994, Series A no. 296-A, p. 18; Remli v. France, judgment of 23 April 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-II, p. 571; Vernillo v. France, judgment of 20 February 1991, Series A no. 198, pp. 11-12; Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, judgment of 16 September 1996, Reports 1996-IV, pp. 1210-11; Qufaj Co. Sh.p.k. v. Albania, no. 54268/00, § 41, 18 November 2004; Keegan v. Ireland, judgment of 26 May 1994, Series A no. 290, p. 19; Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, § 94, ECHR 2000-I; Iglesias Gil and A.U.I. v. Spain, no. 56673/00, § 49, ECHR 2003-V; Sylvester v. Austria, no. 36812/97, 40104/98, § 51, (24 April 2003); Nuutinen v. Finland, no. 32842/96, § 127, ECHR 2000-VIII; Hokkanen v. Finland, judgment of 23 September 1994, Series A no. 299-A, p. 22; Streletz, Kessler and Krenz v. Germany [GC], nos. 34044/96, 35532/97 and 44801/98, § 90, ECHR 2001-II; Al-Adsani v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 35763/97, § 55, ECHR 2001-XI.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Enforcement of Return Orders

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments
Non-Convention Child Abduction Cases under National Law
Policy Issues

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a child born in January 1997 to a Kosovan father and an Albanian mother. The spouses separated in 1998 and the mother took the child to the maternal grandparents' home in Albania. On 6 May 1999, using forged documents, the mother remarried, although not divorced from the father.

On 15 September 1999 the Vlora District Court (Albania) annulled the mother's second marriage. On an unspecified date she married an Albanian national who resided in Greece. During the years that followed the mother's third marriage, she frequently travelled to Greece, leaving the child for long periods with the grandparents in Vlora, or taking her to Greece without the father's consent.

The mother and her parents prohibited the father from having contact with the child. Since the separation the father was permitted to see the child only twice, in September 2000 and May 2003.

On 26 June 2003 the father requested the Vlora Police District to block his daughter's passport in view of the fact that the mother was planning to take her to Greece without his consent. Nevertheless the mother took the child to Greece on 15 January 2004, using an official certificate in which the child had been registered in the mother's surname.

On 15 December 2003 the father initiated criminal proceedings against a Civil Status Office employee. He accused her of falsifying various documents that had enabled the mother to remove the child from Albania. On 26 January 2004 the Vlora District Court decided to discontinue the proceedings.

On 4 February 2004 the Vlora District Court granted custody of the child to the father, having regard to the wife's lack of interest in the child's life, the instability of her residential arrangements and her long periods of separation from the child. On 19 March the custody decision became final.

On 5 April the Vlora District Court issued a writ for the enforcement of the Vlora District Court's judgment of 4 February 2004. On 13 July the Vlora Bailiffs' Office informed the father that it was impossible to enforce the judgment since the child was not in Albania. On 14 August 2004 the father initiated criminal proceedings with the Vlora District Court against his former wife, accusing her of child abduction.

On 15 August 2004 and 13 January 2005 the father applied to the Albanian Ministry of Justice to secure the return of his daughter. On 27 September 2004 the father filed a petition with the ECrtHR. On 13 October 2004 the Vlora District Court informed the Albanian Ombudsperson that no lawsuit had been filed with it relating to the abduction of the father's daughter.

On 11 January 2005, when questioned by the bailiffs, the mother's father declared that the mother and the child were living abroad and that he had no news of their whereabouts. The bailiffs went to the mother's home on three occasions between January 2005 and May 2005.

In May 2005 the Selenice District Police Station informed the bailiffs that the mother and the child were not living in Athens and that the mother's father had moved to an unknown address in Tirana. In July 2005 the Bailiffs' Office informed the father that in order to comply with the bilateral agreement between Albania and Greece (1993 Bilateral Agreement on Mutual Assistance in Civil and Criminal Matters between Greece and Albania) he had to introduce a request and specify the precise address of the child in Greece.

The father sent numerous requests to the Albanian authorities, the Greek Embassy in Albania, the Ombudsperson of Albania (Avokati i Popullit) and the Ombudsperson of Kosovo, in order to obtain assistance in securing the enforcement of the custody decision. On 31 March 2006 the Vlora Court of Appeal repealed the custody judgment of 4 February 2004 on the grounds that the mother had not been duly informed of the custody proceedings.

The case was remitted to the Vlora District Court for a re-hearing. The father stated that he had not been informed of these developments.

Ruling

In an unanimous ruling the Court held that Albania had breached Article 8 of the ECHR in that the efforts of the Albanian authorities were neither adequate nor effective to discharge their positive obligation under Article 8 to reunite the father with his daughter. The Court also made an award of compensation to the father under Article 41 of the ECHR.

INCADAT comment

Enforcement of Return Orders

Where an abducting parent does not comply voluntarily the implementation of a return order will require coercive measures to be taken.  The introduction of such measures may give rise to legal and practical difficulties for the applicant.  Indeed, even where ultimately successful significant delays may result before the child's future can be adjudicated upon in the State of habitual residence.  In some extreme cases the delays encountered may be of such length that it may no longer be appropriate for a return order to be made.


Work of the Hague Conference

Considerable attention has been paid to the issue of enforcement at the Special Commissions convened to review the operation of the Hague Convention.

In the Conclusions of the Fourth Review Special Commission in March 2001 it was noted:

"Methods and speed of enforcement

3.9        Delays in enforcement of return orders, or their non-enforcement, in certain Contracting States are matters of serious concern. The Special Commission calls upon Contracting States to enforce return orders promptly and effectively.

3.10        It should be made possible for courts, when making return orders, to include provisions to ensure that the order leads to the prompt and effective return of the child.

3.11        Efforts should be made by Central Authorities, or by other competent authorities, to track the outcome of return orders and to determine in each case whether enforcement is delayed or not achieved."

See: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" and "Conclusions and Recommendations".

In preparation for the Fifth Review Special Commission in November 2006 the Permanent Bureau prepared a report entitled: "Enforcement of Orders Made Under the 1980 Convention - Towards Principles of Good Practice", Prel. Doc. No 7 of October 2006, (available on the Hague Conference website at < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Preliminary Documents").

The 2006 Special Commission encouraged support for the principles of good practice set out in the report which will serve moreover as a future Guide to Good Practice on Enforcement Issues, see: < www.hcch.net >, under "Child Abduction Section" then "Special Commission meetings on the practical operation of the Convention" then "Conclusions and Recommendations" then "Special Commission of October-November 2006"


European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

The ECrtHR has in recent years paid particular attention to the issue of the enforcement of return orders under the Hague Convention.  On several occasions it has found Contracting States to the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention have failed in their positive obligations to take all the measures that could reasonably be expected to enforce a return order.  This failure has in turn led to a breach of the applicant parent's right to respect for their family life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), see:

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, No. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 336];

Sylvester v. Austria, Nos. 36812/97 and 40104/98, (2003) 37 E.H.R.R. 17, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 502];

H.N. v. Poland, No. 77710/01, (2005) 45 EHRR 1054, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 811];

Karadžic v. Croatia, No. 35030/04, (2005) 44 EHRR 896, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 819];

P.P. v. Poland, No. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 941].

The Court will have regard to the circumstances of the case and the action taken by the national authorities.  A delay of 8 months between the delivery of a return order and enforcement was held not to have constituted a breach of the left behind parent's right to family life in:

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, No. 54429/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 859].

The Court has dismissed challenges by parents who have argued that enforcement measures, including coercive steps, have interfered with their right to a family life, see:

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, No. 4783/03, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 860];

A.B. v. Poland, No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 943];

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, No. 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 942].

The positive obligation to act when faced with the enforcement of a custody order in a non-Hague Convention child abduction case was upheld in:

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 898].

However, where an applicant parent has contributed to delay this will be a relevant consideration, see as regards the enforcement of a custody order following upon an abduction:

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1015].


Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact), see:

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].


Case Law on Enforcement

The following are examples of cases where a return order was made but enforcement was resisted:

Belgium
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 750];

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 915];

Switzerland
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d'appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 433];

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 423];

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 786];

5P.115/2006/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 840].

Enforcement may equally be rendered impossible because of the reaction of the children concerned, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 420];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 112];

Spain
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 899].


Enforcement of Return Orders Pending Appeal

For examples of cases where return orders have been enforced notwithstanding an appeal being pending see:

Argentina
Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n° 11/00 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 772].

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has held that the immediate enforcement of a return order whilst a final legal challenge was still pending did not breach Articles 8, 17, 19 or 25 of the American Convention on Human Rights (San José Pact).

Spain
Sentencia nº 120/2002 (Sala Primera); Número de Registro 129/1999. Recurso de amparo [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ES 907];

United States of America
Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491 (4th Cir. Va., 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494].

In Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392 (4th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 461] while it is not clear whether the petition was lodged prior to the return being executed, the appeal was nevertheless allowed to proceed.

However, in Bekier v. Bekier, 248 F.3d 1051 (11th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 909] an appeal was not allowed to proceed once the child was returned to the State of habitual residence.

In the European Union where following the entry into force of the Brussels IIa Regulation there is now an obligation that abductions cases be dealt with in a six week time frame, the European Commission has suggested that to guarantee compliance return orders might be enforced pending appeal, see Practice Guide for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Policy Issues

When a parent seeks the return of a child outside the scope of the Hague Convention, or another international or regional instrument, the court seised will have to decide how to balance the interests of the child with the general international policy of combating the illicit transfer and non-return of children abroad (Art. 11(1) UNCRC 1990).

Canada
Shortridge-Tsuchiya v. Tsuchiya, 2009 BCSC 541, [2009] B.C.W.L.D. 4138, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1109].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Appellate courts have struggled to agree on the appropriate balance to be struck.

An internationalist interpretation, favouring an approach mirrored on that of Hague Convention, was adopted by the Court of Appeal in:

Re E. (Abduction: Non-Convention Country) [1999] 2 FLR 642 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 589];

Re J. (Child Returned Abroad: Human Rights) [2004] EWCA Civ. 417, [2004] 2 FLR 85 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 586].

However, in the earlier case Re J.A. (Child Abduction: Non-Convention Country) [1998] 1 FLR 231 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 588] a return order was not made, there being concerns as to whether the legal system in the foreign jurisdiction would be able to act in the best interests of the child. A factor in that case was that the abducting mother, who was British, would not be entitled to relocate from the child's State of habitual residence unless she had the consent of the father.

In Re J. (A Child) (Return to Foreign Jurisdiction: Convention Rights), [2005] UKHL 40, [2006] 1 AC 80, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 801] the House of Lords expressly stated that the approach of the Court of Appeal in Re J.A. (Child Abduction: Non-Convention Country) [1998] 1 FLR 231 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 588] was the one to be preferred.

The House of Lords held that the rationale of the Hague Convention necessarily meant that the State of refuge might on occasion have to do something which was not in the best interests of the individual child involved. States parties had accepted this disadvantage to some individual children for the sake of the greater advantage to children in general.  However, there was no warrant, either in statute or authority, for the principles of the Hague Convention to be extended to countries which were not parties to it. In a non-Convention case the court must act in accordance with the welfare of the individual child. Whilst there was no ‘strong presumption' in favour of return on the facts of an individual case a summary return may very well be in the best interests of the individual child.

It may be noted that in Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 854, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982] a trial judge who felt compelled to discharge his original order for return in the light, inter alia, of the ruling in Re M. had his judgment overturned. The Court of Appeal did not, however, comment on the ruling of the House of Lords and the case ostensibly turned on the existence of new evidence, pointing to the inevitability of the mother's deportation.

In E.M. (Lebanon) v. Secretary of State for the Home Department [2008] UKHL 64, [2009] 1 A.C. 1198 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 994] an immigration case centred around the wrongful removal of a child from a non-Convention country, the House of Lords ruled that a return would lead to a violation of the child's and his mother's right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). However, it must be noted that on the facts the child's only ‘family life' was with the mother, the father having had no contact with the child since the day of his birth. A majority of the panel (4:1) held that the discriminatory nature of Lebanese family law, which would have led to the automatic transfer of care for the child being passed from mother to father, upon the child reaching his 7th birthday, would not have led to a breach of the ECHR.

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né en janvier 1997 de père kosovar et de mère albanaise. A la séparation du couple, la mère emmena l'enfant chez ses parents en Albanie. Le 6 mai 1999, usant de faux, la mère se remaria, alors qu'elle n'avait pas divorcé du père.

Le 15 septembre 1999, le juge cantonal de Vlora en Albanie annula le second mariage de la mère. A une date indéterminée, elle se maria à un ressortissant albanais résidant en Grèce. Pendant les années qui s'ensuivirent, elle alla fréquemment en Grèce, laissant l'enfant chez ses parents pendant de longues périodes ou l'emmenant en Grèce sans l'autorisation du père.

La mère et ses parents interdirent au père d'avoir des contacts avec l'enfant. Ils ne se rencontrèrent que 2 fois après la séparation, en septembre 2000 et mai 2003.

Le 26 juin 2003 le père demanda à la police de Vlora de bloquer son passeport car la mère prévoyait d'emmener l'enfant en Grèce sans son consentement. Toutefois, la mère emmena l'enfant en Grèce le 15 janvier 2004, utilisant un certificat officiel sur lequel l'enfant portait le patronyme de sa mère.

Le 15 décembre 2003 le père entama une procédure criminelle contre un employé du service de l'état civil, qu'il accusait d'avoir falsifié des documents permettant à la mère d'emmener l'enfant à l'étranger. Le 26 janvier 2004, le juge cantonal de Vlora décida d'interrompre la procedure.

Le 4 janvier 2004, le juge cantonal de Vlora donna la garde de l'enfant au père, tirant les conséquences du peu d'intérêt manifesté par la mère à l'égard de sa fille, de l'instabilité de ses résidences et des longues périodes de séparation entre la mère et l'enfant. Le 19 mars cette décision devint définitive.

Le 5 avril, l'exécution forcée de la décision fut ordonnée. Le 13 juillet, le service d'huissiers de Vlora informa le père qu'il était impossible de mettre le jugement de février 2004 à exécution dans la mesure où l'enfant n'était pas en Albanie. Le 14 août 2004 le père déposa une plainte pénale contre son ex-épouse, qu'il accusait d'enlèvement d'enfant.

Le 15 août et le 13 janvier 2005, le père demanda le retour de l'enfant au Ministère albanais de la Justice. Entretemps, le 27 septembre 2004, le père saisit la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme. Le 13 octobre 2004 le juge cantonal de Vlora informa le médiateur albanais qu'aucune procédure n'avait été entamée contre la mère pour enlèvement.

Le 11 janvier 2005, interrogé par un huissier, le père de la mère indiqua que sa fille et sa petite-fille vivaient à l'étranger mais qu'il ne connaissait pas leur lieu de résidence. Entre janvier et mai 2005, l'huissier se rendit par trois fois au domilicle maternel.

En mai 2005, la police du canton de Selenice informa l'huissier que la mère et l'enfant ne vivaient pas à Athènes et que le père de la mère avait déménagé à une adresse inconnue à Tirana. En juillet 2005 le service d'huissier informa le père qu'en application de l'accord bilatéral gréco-albanais de 1993 sur l'assistance en matière civile et pénale, il devait introduire une demande spécifiant l'adresse exacte de l'enfant en Grèce.

Le père adressa plusieurs demandes aux autorités albanaises, à l'embassade de Grèce en Albanie, au médiateur albanais (Avokati i Popullit) et au médiateur du Kosovo afin d'obtenir de l'aide dans l'exécution de la décision de garde. Le 31 mars 2006 la cour d'appel de Vlora rétracta le jugement du 4 février 2004 au motif que la mère n'avait pas été utilement informée de la procédure de garde.

L'affaire fut renvoyée au tribunal cantonal de Vlora afin qu'il statue de nouveau sur la question. Le père indiqua qu'il n'avait pas été informé de ces développements.

Dispositif

Par décision unanime, la cour décida que l'Albanie avait violé l'article 8 CEDH en ce que les efforts des autorités albanaises n'étaient ni adéquats ni suffisants alors qu'elles étaient tenues d'une obligation positive de réunir le père et sa fille. Le père obtint des dommages-intérêts sur le fondement de l'article 41.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exécution de l'ordonnance de retour

Lorsqu'un parent ravisseur ne remet pas volontairement un enfant dont le retour a été judiciairement ordonné, l'exécution implique des mesures coercitives. L'introduction de telles mesures peut donner lieu à des difficultés juridiques et pratiques pour le demandeur. En effet, même lorsque le retour a finalement lieu, des retards considérables peuvent être intervenus avant que les juridictions de l'État de résidence habituelle ne statuent sur l'avenir de l'enfant. Dans certains cas exceptionnels les retards sont tels qu'il n'est plus approprié qu'un retour soit ordonné.


Travail de la Conférence de La Haye

Les Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement de la Convention de La Haye ont concentré des efforts considérables sur la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour.

Dans les conclusions de la Quatrième Commission spéciale de mars 2001, il fut noté :

« Méthodes et rapidité d'exécution des procédures

3.9       Les retards dans l'exécution des décisions de retour, ou l'inexécution de celles-ci, dans certains [É]tats contractants soulèvent de sérieuses inquiétudes. La Commission spéciale invite les [É]tats contractants à exécuter les décisions de retour sans délai et effectivement.

3.10       Lorsqu'ils rendent une décision de retour, les tribunaux devraient avoir les moyens d'inclure dans leur décision des dispositions garantissant que la décision aboutisse à un retour effectif et immédiat de l'enfant.

3.11       Les Autorités centrales ou autres autorités compétentes devraient fournir des efforts pour assurer le suivi des décisions de retour et pour déterminer dans chaque cas si l'exécution a eu lieu ou non, ou si elle a été retardée. »

Voir < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations ».

Afin de préparer la Cinquième Commission spéciale en novembre 2006, le Bureau permanent a élaboré un rapport sur « L'exécution des décisions fondées sur la Convention de La Haye de 1980 - Vers des principes de bonne pratique », Doc. prél. No 7 d'octobre 2006.

(Disponible sur le site de la Conférence à l'adresse suivante : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Documents préliminaires »).

Cette Commission spéciale souligna l'importance des principes de bonne pratique développés dans le rapport qui serviront à l'élaboration d'un futur Guide de bonnes pratiques sur les questions liées à l'exécution, voir : < www.hcch.net >, sous les rubriques « Espace Enlèvement d'enfants » et « Réunions des Commissions spéciales sur le fonctionnement pratique de la Convention » puis « Conclusions et Recommandations » et enfin « Commission Spéciale d'Octobre-Novembre 2006 »


Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)

Ces dernières années, la CourEDH a accordé une attention particulière à la question de l'exécution des décisions de retour fondées sur la Convention de La Haye. À plusieurs reprises elle estima que des États membres avaient failli à leur obligation positive de  prendre toutes les mesures auxquelles on pouvait raisonnablement s'attendre en vue de l'exécution, les condamnant sur le fondement de l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) sur le respect de la vie familiale. Voir :

Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, 25 January 2000 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 336] ;

Sylvester v. Austria, 24 April 2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 502] ;

H.N. v. Poland, 13 September 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 811] ;                       

Karadžic v. Croatia, 15 December 2005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 819] ;

P.P. v. Poland, Application no. 8677/03, 8 January 2008, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 941].

La Cour tient compte de l'ensemble des circonstances de l'affaire et des mesures prises par les autorités nationales.  Un retard de 8 mois entre l'ordonnance de retour et son exécution a pu être considéré comme ne violant pas le droit du parent demandeur au respect de sa vie familiale dans :

Couderc v. Czech Republic, 31 January 2001, Application n°54429/00, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 859].

La Cour a par ailleurs rejeté les requêtes de parents qui avaient soutenu que les mesures d'exécution prises, y compris les mesures coercitives, violaient le droit au respect de leur vie familiale :

Paradis v. Germany, 15 May 2003, Application n°4783/03, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 860] ;

A.B. v. Poland, Application No. 33878/96, 20 November 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 943] ;

Maumousseau and Washington v. France, Application No 39388/05, 6 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 942] ;

L'obligation positive de prendre des mesures face à l'exécution d'une décision concernant le droit de garde d'un enfant a également été reconnue dans une affaire ne relevant pas de la Convention de La Haye :

Bajrami v. Albania, 12 December 2006 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 898].

Ancel v. Turkey, No. 28514/04, 17 February 2009, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1015].


Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme

La Commission interaméricaine des Droits de l'Homme a décidé que l'exécution immédiate d'une ordonnance de retour qui avait fait l'objet d'un recours ne violait pas les articles 8, 17, 19 ni 25 de la Convention américaine relative aux Droits de l'Homme (Pacte de San José), voir :

Case 11.676, X et Z v. Argentina, 3 October 2000, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Report n°71/00 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 772].


Jurisprudence en matière d'exécution

Dans les exemples suivants l'exécution de l'ordonnance de retour s'est heurtée à des difficultés, voir :

Belgique
Cour de cassation 30/10/2008, C.G. c. B.S., N° de rôle: C.06.0619.F, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 750] ;

Canada
H.D. et N.C. c. H.F.C., Cour d'appel (Montréal), 15 mai 2000, N° 500-09-009601-006 (500-04-021679-007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 915] ;

Suisse
427/01/1998, 49/III/97/bufr/mour, Cour d’appel du canton de Berne (Suisse); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 433] ;

5P.160/2001/min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 423] ;

5P.454/2000/ZBE/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 786] ;

5P.115/2006 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 840] ;

L'exécution peut également être rendue impossible en raison de la réaction des enfants en cause. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re B. (Children) (Abduction: New Evidence) [2001] 2 FCR 531; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 420]

Lorsqu'un enfant a été caché pendant plusieurs années à l'issue d'une ordonnance de retour, il peut ne plus être dans son intérêt d'être l'objet d'une ordonnance de retour. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron (No. 3) 1997 SCLR 192, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 112] ;

Espagne
Auto Juzgado de Familia Nº 6 de Zaragoza (España), Expediente Nº 1233/95-B [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ES 899].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Problèmes de fond

Lorsqu'un parent demande le retour d'un enfant dans une situation ne relevant pas de la Convention de La Haye ni d'un autre instrument international ou régional, le tribunal saisi doit mettre en balance l'intérêt de l'enfant et le principe international selon lequel les États doivent prendre des mesures en vue de lutter contre les déplacements et non-retours illicites d'enfants à l'étranger (art. 11(1) de la Convention des Nations Unies sur les Droits de l'enfant de 1990).

Canada
Shortridge-Tsuchiya v. Tsuchiya, 2009 BCSC 541, [2009] B.C.W.L.D. 4138, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1109].

Royaume-Uni : Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Les juges d'appel ont développé des approches discordantes sur cette question.

Dans les affaires suivantes, la cour d'appel a privilégié une vision internationaliste analogue à celle de la Convention de La Haye :

Re E. (Abduction: Non-Convention Country) [1999] 2 FLR 642 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 589] ;

Re J. (Child Returned Abroad: Human Rights) - [2004] 2 FLR 85 [2004] EWCA Civ. 417 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 586].

Toutefois dans l'affaire plus ancienne de Re J.A. (Child Abduction: Non-Convention Country) [1998] 1 FLR 231 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 588] le retour n'avait pas été prononcé au motif qu'il était douteux que l'État de la résidence habituelle puisse agir dans l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. En l'espèce la mère, auteur de l'enlèvement et ressortissante britannique, n'aurait pas été autorisée à quitter l'État de la résidence habituelle sans le consentement du père.

Dans Re J. (A child) (Return to foreign jurisdiction: convention rights), [2005] UKHL 40, [2006] 1 AC 80, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 801], la Chambre des Lords approuva expressément l'approche privilégiée dans Re J.A. (Child Abduction: Non-Convention Country) [1998] 1 FLR 231 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 588].

La Chambre des Lords indiqua que le principe sous-tendant la Convention de La Haye impliquait nécessairement que dans certains cas l'État de refuge devait prendre des mesures qui n'étaient pas dans l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant en cause.  Les États contractants avaient accepté cet état de fait parce que la Convention permettait d'atteindre l'intérêt supérieur des enfants en général. Néanmoins, la Chambre des Lords rappela que ni la loi ni les précédents judiciaires ne prévoyaient l'extension des principes de la Convention de La Haye aux États non contractants. Dans les affaires ne relevant pas de conventions internationales le juge devait agir dans l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant en cause. Quoiqu'il n'y ait pas de présomption forte en faveur du retour il convient d'étudier au cas par cas si le retour immédiat de l'enfant n'est pas dans son intérêt supérieur.

Il convient de souligner que dans l'affaire Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982] un juge revint sur sa décision d'ordonner le retour notamment en raison de l'affaire Re M. La Cour d'appel ne discuta toutefois pas la décision de la Chambre des Lords, insistant sur des éléments nouveaux qui montraient qu'il était inévitable que la mère soit renvoyée dans son pays vu son statut d'immigration.

Dans E.M. (Lebanon) v. Secretary of State for the Home Department [2008] UKHL 64, [2008] 3 W.L.R. 931, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 994], un enfant avait été enlevé de son pays de résidence habituelle, qui n'était pas partie à aucune convention relative à l'enlèvement. Il s'agissait en l'espèce d'une affaire d'immigration. La demande d'asile de la mère avait été refusée mais son argument selon lequel le retour aurait violé son droit et le droit de son enfant au respect de la vie familiale selon l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH) avait finalement prévalu. Toutefois, il importe de noter qu'en l'espèce la vie familiale de l'enfant se résumait à sa vie avec sa mère puisque que le père n'avait eu aucun contact avec lui depuis sa naissance. Par une majorité de 4 contre 1, les juges estimèrent que le droit de la famille libanais, quoique de nature discriminatoire puisqu'il imposait le transfert automatique de la responsabilité de l'enfant de la mère au père le jour de son 7ème anniversaire, ne violait pas en principe la CEDH.