CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKe 1068

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

Supreme Court

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Lord Hope (Deputy President), Lord Walker, Lady Hale, Lord Kerr, Lord Wilson

States involved

Requesting State

NORWAY

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Decision

Date

10 June 2011

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Appeal dismissed, return ordered subject to undertakings

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b)

Other provisions
Art. 3(1) UNCRC; Art. 8 ECHR
Authorities | Cases referred to
Z.H. (Tanzania) v. Secretary of State for the Home Department [2011] UKSC 4; [2011] 2 W.L.R. 148; Neulinger v. Switzerland (41615/07) [2011] 1 F.L.R. 122; 28 B.H.R.C. 706; Deak v United Kingdom (19055/05) (2008) 47 E.H.R.R. 50; Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55; [2008] 1 A.C. 1288; Re D (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 A.C. 619; DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority [2001] HCA 39, 206 C.L.R. 401; T.B. v. J.B. (formerly J.H.) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm)[2001] 2 F.L.R. 515.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Convention Aims
Convention Aims

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments
UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)
UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Impact of Convention Proceedings on Siblings and Step-Siblings
Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Oral Evidence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | ES

Facts

The proceedings related to two girls, born in Norway in May 2004 and April 2007. The British mother and Norwegian father had married shortly after the birth of the first child. The family lived in Norway. Both parents had children from previous relationships. The mother's teenage daughter lived with the family.

In August 2010, the teenage daughter left the family home to live with the maternal grandparents in England. In early September, the mother followed, taking the girls with her.

The father immediately petitioned for the girls' return. At trial it was submitted that given her vulnerable personality (she suffered from adjustment disorder), the mother's reaction to a return order being made would constitute a grave risk of harm to the children. Expert evidence was given on this. The argument was nevertheless rejected by the trial judge.

The father had responded to the mother's submission by offering undertakings, including making the family home available for sole occupation and by providing periodical payments. The expert who had assessed the mother advised that protective measures be put in place in advance of a return in order to reduce the mother's anxiety, as well as the risk of non-compliance or breach.

To this end the mother requested that there be documentary confirmation of six conditions. The trial judge rejected this request, finding that there was already sufficient evidence that the mother's protection would be secured. She added that seeking further proof was simply a delaying tactic.

The trial judge noted that she had to pay regard to the ruling of the European Court of Human Rights in Neulinger and in her conclusion she held that it was overwhelmingly in the girls' best interests to return to Norway for their futures to be decided there. They were very young and had not put down roots in the United Kingdom, and would be returning to an environment where both parents would be living. Their welfare needs pointed emphatically to a summary return.

The mother appealed and she was joined by the step-sister, who was given party status. On 1 April 2011 the Court of Appeal dismissed the mother's appeal. The mother sought and obtained leave to appeal to the United Kingdom Supreme Court.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return upheld, subject to undertakings; neither Art. 3(1) UNCRC nor Art. 8 ECHR, as interpreted by the Grand Chamber in Neulinger, required a re-appraisal of the interpretation of the Hague Convention in England & Wales. It was accepted that Art. 13(1)(b) should be interpreted without any additional gloss being applied to its terms, but this did not impact upon the outcome of the appeal.

INCADAT comment

See for the decision of the Court of Appeal Eliasson v. Eliasson [2011] EWCA Civ 361 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/UK 1066]; see also Re S. (A Child) [2012] UKSC 10 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/UKe 1147] and S. v. C. (Abduction: Art.13 Defence: Procedure) [2011] EWCA Civ 1385; [2012] 1 F.C.R. 172 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/UKe 1148].  

Convention Aims

Courts in all Contracting States must inevitably make reference to and evaluate the aims of the Convention if they are to understand the purpose of the instrument, and so be guided in how its concepts should be interpreted and provisions applied.

The 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, explicitly and implicitly, embodies a range of aims and objectives, positive and negative, as it seeks to achieve a delicate balance between the competing interests of the central actors; the child, the left behind parent and the abducting parent, see for example the discussion in the decision of the Canadian Supreme Court: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 17].

Article 1 identifies the core aims, namely that the Convention seeks:
"a) to secure the prompt return of children wrongfully removed to or retained in any Contracting State; and
 b) to ensure that rights of custody and of access under the law of one Contracting State are effectively respected in the other Contracting States."

Further clarification, most notably to the primary purpose of achieving the return of children where their removal or retention has led to the breach of actually exercised rights of custody, is given in the Preamble.

Therein it is recorded that:

"the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody;

and that States signatory desire:

 to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention;

 to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence; and

 to secure protection for rights of access."

The aim of return and the manner in which it should best be achieved is equally reinforced in subsequent Articles, notably in the duties required of Central Authorities (Arts 8-10) and in the requirement for judicial authorities to act expeditiously (Art. 11).

Article 13, along with Articles 12(2) and 20, which contain the exceptions to the summary return mechanism, indicate that the Convention embodies an additional aim, namely that in certain defined circumstances regard may be paid to the specific situation, including the best interests, of the individual child or even taking parent.

The Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report draws (at para. 19) attention to an implicit aim on which the Convention rests, namely that any debate on the merits of custody rights should take place before the competent authorities in the State where the child had his habitual residence prior to its removal, see for example:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 362]
 
Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 839]

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 214]

Netherlands
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 316]

Switzerland
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 986]

United Kingdom - Scotland
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 996]

United States of America
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 125]
 
The Pérez-Vera Report equally articulates the preventive dimension to the instrument's return aim (at paras. 17, 18, 25), a goal which was specifically highlighted during the ratification process of the Convention in the United States (see: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) and which has subsequently been relied upon in that Contracting State when applying the Convention, see:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 741]

Applying the principle of equitable tolling where an abducted child had been concealed was held to be consistent with the purpose of the Convention to deter child abduction.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578]

In contrast to other federal Courts of Appeals, the 11th Circuit was prepared to interpret a ne exeat right as including the right to determine a child's place of residence since the goal of the Hague Convention was to deter international abduction and the ne exeat right provided a parent with decision-making authority regarding the child's international relocation.

In other jurisdictions, deterrence has on occasion been raised as a relevant factor in the interpretation and application of the Convention, see for example:

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 754]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 50]

Aims and objectives may equally rise to prominence during the life of the instrument, such as the promotion of transfrontier contact, which it has been submitted will arise by virtue of a strict application of the Convention's summary return mechanism, see:

New Zealand
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 296]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 60]

There is no hierarchy between the different aims of the Convention (Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report, at para. 18).  Judicial interpretation may therefore differ as between Contracting States as more or less emphasis is placed on particular objectives.  Equally jurisprudence may evolve, whether internally or internationally.

In United Kingdom case law (England and Wales) a decision of that jurisdiction's then supreme jurisdiction, the House of Lords, led to a reappraisal of the Convention's aims and consequently a re-alignment in court practice as regards the exceptions:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Previously a desire to give effect to the primary goal of promoting return and thereby preventing an over-exploitation of the exceptions, had led to an additional test of exceptionality being added to the exceptions, see for example:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 901]

It was this test of exceptionality which was subsequently held to be unwarranted by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

- Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine:

In United States Convention case law different approaches have been taken in respect of applicants who have or are alleged to have themselves breached court orders under the "fugitive disentitlement doctrine".

In Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 150], the fugitive disentitlement doctrine was applied, the applicant father in the Convention application having left the United States to escape his criminal conviction and other responsibilities to the United States courts.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 326]

In the instant case the father was a fugitive. Secondly, it was arguable there was some connection between his fugitive status and the petition. But the court found that the connection not to be strong enough to support the application of the doctrine. In any event, the court also held that applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine would impose too severe a sanction in a case involving parental rights.

In March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 386], the doctrine was not applied where the applicant was in breach of civil orders.

In the Canadian case Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 760], the father's fugitive status was held to be a factor in there being a grave risk of harm facing the child.

Author: Peter McEleavy

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Impact of Convention Proceedings on Siblings and Step-Siblings

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Oral Evidence

To ensure that Convention cases are dealt with expeditiously, as is required by the Convention, courts in a number of jurisdictions have restricted the use of oral evidence, see:

Australia
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 277]

It should be noted however that more recently Australia's supreme jurisdiction, the High Court, has cautioned against the ‘inadequate, albeit prompt, disposition of return applications', rather a ‘thorough examination on adequate evidence of the issues' was required, see:

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 988].

Canada
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 758].

The Court of Appeal for Ontario held that if credibility was a serious issue, courts should consider hearing viva voce evidence of witnesses whose credibility is in issue.

China - Hong Kong
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 234];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40];

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

In the above case it was accepted that a situation where oral evidence should be allowed was where the affidavit evidence was in direct conflict.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 771]

In the above case the Court of Appeal ruled that a trial judge could consider of his own motion to allow oral evidence where he conceived that oral evidence might be determinative of the case.

However, to warrant oral exploration of written evidence as to the existence of a grave risk of harm which was only embryonic on the written material, a judge must be satisfied that there was a realistic possibility that oral evidence would establish an Article 13(1) b) case.

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 906]

Here the Court of Appeal affirmed that where the exception of acquiescence was alleged oral evidence was more commonly allowed because of the necessity to ascertain the applicant's subjective state of mind, as well as his communications in response to knowledge of the removal or retention.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FI 839].

Ireland
In the Matter of M. N. (A Child) [2008] IEHC 382; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 992].

The trial judge noted that applications were heard on affidavit evidence only, except where the Court, in exceptional circumstances, directed or permitted oral evidence.

New Zealand
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 492];

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 248];

South Africa
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 497];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

In the above case the Supreme Court of Appeal noted that even where the parties had not requested that oral evidence be admitted, it might be required where a finding on the issue of consent could not otherwise be reached.

United States of America
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 797]

The father argued that the trial court denied him a fair hearing because it determined disputed issues of fact without hearing oral evidence from the parties.

The Court of Appeal rejected this submission noting that nothing in the Hague Convention entitled the father to an evidentiary hearing with sworn witness testimony. Moreover, it noted that under California law declarations could be used in place of witness testimony in various situations.

The Court further ruled that the father could not question the propriety of the procedure used with regard to evidence on appeal because he did not object to the use of affidavits in evidence at trial.

For a consideration of the use of oral evidence in Convention proceedings see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 257 et seq.

Under the rules applicable within the European Union for intra-EU abductions (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (Brussels II a)) Convention applications are now subject to additional provisions, including the requirement that an applicant be heard before a non-return order is made [Article 11(5) Brussels II a Regulation], and, that the child be heard ‘during the proceedings unless this appears inappropriate having regard to his or her age or degree of maturity' [Article 11(2) Brussels II a Regulation].

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Hechos

El proceso versó sobre la situación de dos niñas que nacieron en Noruega en mayo de 2004 y abril de 2007, de madre británica y padre noruego que habían contraído matrimonio poco después del nacimiento de la primera. La familia vivía en Noruega y ambos padres tenían hijos de relaciones anteriores. La hija adolescente de la madre vivía junto con la familia.

En agosto de 2010, la hija adolescente dejó el hogar familiar y se fue a vivir con sus abuelos maternos en Inglaterra. A principios de septiembre, la madre la siguió y se llevó a las dos niñas menores consigo.

Inmediatamente después de ello, el padre solicitó la restitución de sus hijas. En primera instancia se argumentó que, habida cuenta de la personalidad vulnerable de la madre (sufría un trastorno de adaptación), la reacción de esta ante una resolución de restitución representaría un riesgo grave para las menores, según se había establecido en las pericias. No obstante, este argumento fue rechazado por la jueza de primera instancia.

El padre había respondido a la pretensión de la madre ofreciendo compromisos, entre ellos, dejarles el hogar familiar disponible para su uso exclusivo, y pagarles cantidades de dinero periódicamente. El experto que había examinado a la madre sugirió que se adoptaran medidas de protección antes de que se dictara una orden de restitución para reducir la ansiedad de la madre, así como el riesgo de que no acatara la orden o que la incumpliera.

A estos fines, la madre solicitó prueba escrita de seis condiciones. La jueza de primera instancia rechazó dicha solicitud al estimar que ya había pruebas suficientes de que se garantizaría la protección de la madre. Añadió que solicitar más pruebas era tan solo una maniobra dilatoria.

La jueza de primera instancia señaló que debía tener en cuenta el fallo Neulinger del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos y declaró en su conclusión que regresar a Noruega atendía al superior interés de las menores para que se decidiera su futuro allí. Eran de muy corta edad, no se habían integrado en el Reino Unido, y estarían regresando al lugar donde vivían sus dos padres. Sus necesidades claramente apuntaban a un retorno inmediato.

La madre interpuso recurso de apelación y la medio hermana se incorporó al proceso y asumió calidad de parte. El 1 de abril de 2011 el Tribunal de Apelaciones desestimó el recurso de la madre. La madre solicitó autorización para interponer recurso ante el Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido, el cual le fue otorgado.

Fallo

Recurso de apelación desestimado y restitución confirmada, con compromisos. Ni el artículo 3(1) de la CDN ni el artículo 8 del CEDH, según la interpretación de la Gran Sala en Neulinger, requerían que se realizara una nueva evaluación de la interpretación dada al Convenio de La Haya en Inglaterra y Gales. Se aceptó que el artículo 13(1)(b) debía interpretarse sin que se añadieran comentarios con respecto a la interpretación de sus términos. Sin embargo, esto no afectó el resultado de la apelación.

Comentario INCADAT

Véase la sentencia del Tribunal de Apelaciones en Eliasson v. Eliasson [2011] EWCA Civ 361 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UK 1066]; véase también Re S. (A Child) [2012] UKSC 10 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147] y S. v. C. (Abduction: Art.13 Defence: Procedure) [2011] EWCA Civ 1385; [2012] 1 F.C.R. 172 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1148].

Objetivos del Convenio

Los órganos jurisdiccionales de todos los Estados contratantes deben inevitablemente referirse a los objetivos del Convenio y evaluarlos si pretenden comprender la finalidad del Convenio y contar con una guía sobre la manera de interpretar sus conceptos y aplicar sus disposiciones.

El Convenio de La Haya de 1980 sobre Sustracción de Menores comprende explícita e implícitamente una gran variedad de objetivos ―positivos y negativos―, ya que pretende establecer un equilibrio entre los distintos intereses de las partes principales: el menor, el padre privado del menor y el padre sustractor. Véanse, por ejemplo, las opiniones vertidas en la sentencia de la Corte Suprema de Canadá: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 17].

En el artículo 1 se identifican los objetivos principales, a saber, que la finalidad del Convenio consiste en lo siguiente:

"a) garantizar la restitución inmediata de los menores trasladados o retenidos de manera ilícita en cualquier Estado contratante;

b) velar por que los derechos de custodia y de visita vigentes en uno de los Estados contratantes se respeten en los demás Estados contratantes."

En el Preámbulo se brindan más detalles al respecto, en especial sobre el objetivo primordial de obtener la restitución del menor en los casos en que el traslado o la retención ha dado lugar a una violación de derechos de custodia ejercidos efectivamente. Reza lo siguiente:

"Los Estados signatarios del presente Convenio,

Profundamente convencidos de que los intereses del menor son de una importancia primordial para todas las cuestiones relativas a su custodia,

Deseosos de proteger al menor, en el plano internacional, de los efectos perjudiciales que podría ocasionarle un traslado o una retención ilícitos y de establecer los procedimientos que permitan garantizar la restitución inmediata del menor a un Estado en que tenga su residencia habitual, así como de asegurar la protección del derecho de visita".

El objetivo de restitución y la mejor manera de acometer su consecución se ven reforzados, asimismo, en los artículos que siguen, en especial en las obligaciones de las Autoridades Centrales (arts. 8 a 10), y en la exigencia que pesa sobre las autoridades judiciales de actuar con urgencia (art. 11).

El artículo 13, junto con los artículos 12(2) y 20, que contienen las excepciones al mecanismo de restitución inmediata, indican que el Convenio tiene otro objetivo más, a saber, que en ciertas circunstancias se puede tener en consideración la situación concreta del menor (en especial su interés superior) o incluso del padre sustractor.

El Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera dirige el foco de atención (en el párr. 19) a un objetivo no explícito sobre el que descansa el Convenio que consiste en que el debate respecto del fondo del derecho de custodia debería iniciarse ante las autoridades competentes del Estado en el que el menor tenía su residencia habitual antes del traslado. Véanse por ejemplo:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 362]

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839]

Francia
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 214]

Países Bajos

X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 316]

Suiza
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986]

Reino Unido – Escocia

N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996]

Estados Unidos de América

Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 125]

El Informe Pérez-Vera también especifica la dimensión preventiva del objetivo de restitución del Convenio (en los párrs. 17, 18 y 25), objetivo que fue destacado durante el proceso de ratificación del Convenio en los Estados Unidos (véase: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)), que ha servido de fundamento para aplicar el Convenio en ese Estado contratante. Véase:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 741]

Se ha declarado que en los casos en que un menor sustraído ha sido mantenido oculto, la aplicación del principio de suspensión del plazo de prescripción derivado del sistema de equity (equitable tolling) es coherente con el objetivo del Convenio que consiste en prevenir la sustracción de menores.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 578]

A diferencia de otros tribunales federales de apelaciones, el Tribunal del Undécimo Circuito estaba listo para interpretar que un derecho de ne exeat comprende el derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia habitual del menor, dado que el objetivo del Convenio de La Haya consiste en prevenir la sustracción internacional y que el derecho de ne exeat atribuye al progenitor la facultad de decidir el país de residencia del menor.

En otros países, la prevención ha sido invocada a veces como un factor relevante para la interpretación y la aplicación del Convenio. Véanse por ejemplo:

Canadá
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]

Los fines y objetivos del Convenio también pueden adquirir prominencia durante la vigencia del instrumento, por ejemplo, la promoción de las visitas transfronterizas, que, según los argumentos que se han postulado, surge de una aplicación estricta del mecanismo de restitución inmediata del Convenio. Véanse:

Nueva Zelanda

S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 296]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60]

No hay jerarquía entre los distintos objetivos del Convenio (párr. 18 del Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera). Por tanto, la interpretación de los tribunales puede variar de un Estado contratante a otro al adjudicar más o menos importancia a determinados objetivos. Asimismo, la doctrina puede evolucionar a nivel nacional o internacional.

En la jurisprudencia británica (Inglaterra y País de Gales), una decisión de la máxima instancia judicial de ese momento, la Cámara de los Lores, dio lugar a una revalorización de los objetivos del Convenio y, por consiguiente, a un cambio en la práctica de los tribunales con respecto a las excepciones:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Anteriormente, la voluntad de dar efecto al objetivo principal de promover el retorno y evitar que se recurra de forma abusiva a las excepciones había dado lugar a un nuevo criterio sobre el "carácter excepcional" de las circunstancias en el establecimiento de las excepciones. Véanse por ejemplo:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901]

Este criterio relativo al carácter excepcional de las circunstancias fue posteriormente declarado infundado por la Cámara de los Lores en el asunto Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

- Teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo (Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine):

En Estados Unidos la jurisprudencia ha optado por diferentes enfoques con respecto a los demandantes que no han respetado, o no habrían respetado, una resolución judicial dictada en aplicación de la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo.

En el asunto Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 150] se aplicó la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo, ya que el padre demandante había dejado los Estados Unidos para escapar de una condena penal y de otras responsabilidades ante los tribunales estadounidenses.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July25, 2000) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 326]

En este asunto el padre era un fugitivo. En segundo lugar, se podía sostener que había una conexión entre su estatus de fugitivo y la solicitud. Sin embargo, el tribunal declaró que la conexión no era lo suficientemente importante como para se pudiera aplicar la teoría. En todo caso, estimó que su aplicación impondría una sanción demasiado severa en un caso de derechos parentales.

En el asunto March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 386] no se aplicó la teoría en un caso en que el demandante no había respetado resoluciones civiles.

En un asunto en Canadá, Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 760], el estatus de fugitivo del padre fue declarado un factor a tener en cuenta, en el sentido de representar un riesgo grave para el menor.

Autor: Peter McEleavy

Fallos del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)

Impacto del Convenio en hermanos/hermanastros

En curso de elaboración.

Prueba presentada oralmente

Para garantizar que los casos tramitados con arreglo al Convenio sean tratados con celeridad, como lo exige el Convenio, los tribunales en varias jurisdicciones han restringido el uso de la prueba testimonial. Véanse:

Australia
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 277]

Debe observarse, sin embargo, que más recientemente la máxima instancia de Australia, la High Court, ha advertido contra la "resolución inadecuada, aunque pronta, de solicitudes de restitución", en cambio se exije un "examen minucioso respecto de las pruebas adecuadas". Véase:

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 988].

Canadá
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 758]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones de Ontario sostuvo que si la credibilidad era un problema serio, los tribunales debían considerar escuchar las declaraciones de los testigos cuya credibilidad estuviera cuestionada en un procedimiento oral.

China - Hong Kong
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 234]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 40];

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 37].

En el caso anteriormente mencionado se aceptó que una situación en la que debería permitirse la prueba testimonial era aquella en la que la prueba documental se encontraba en conflicto directo.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 771];

En el caso anterior, el Tribunal de Apelación falló que un juez de primera instancia podría considerar de oficio el permitir la prueba testimonial cuando considerara que la prueba testimonial puede resultar determinante para el caso.

Sin embargo, para garantizar la exploración verbal respecto de la existencia de un grave riesgo de daño que era solo embrionario en la prueba escrita, un juez debía estar convencido de que existía una posibilidad realista de que la prueba testimonial configurara un caso del artículo 13(1)(b).

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 906];

En este caso el Tribunal de Apelación afirmó que cuando se alegaba la excepción de aceptación posterior, se permitía de manera más general la prueba testimonial debido a la necesidad de asegurar el estado mental subjetivo del solicitante, así como también sus comunicaciones en respuesta al conocimiento del traslado o retención.

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839].

Irlanda
In the Matter of M. N. (A Child) [2008] IEHC 382, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 992].

El juez de primera instancia observó que las solicitudes eran consideradas solo en relación a la prueba documental, excepto cuando el tribunal, en circunstancias excepcionales, ordenaba o permitía la prueba testimonial.

Nueva Zelanda
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 492];

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 248]

Sudáfrica
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 497];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

En el caso que antecede la Corte Suprema de Apelaciones observó que incluso cuando las partes no habían solicitado que se admitiera la prueba testimonial, esta se podría exigir cuando la cuestión del consentimiento no pudiera resolverse de otro modo. 

Estados Unidos de América
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 797].

El padre argumentó que el juzgado de primera instancia le había negado una audiencia justa, dado que había determinado los asuntos de hecho en disputa sin escuchar la prueba testimonial de las partes.

El Tribunal de Apelaciones rechazó su planteo, destacando que nada en el Convenio de La Haya da al padre el derecho a una audiencia de prueba con declaración jurada de testigos. También destacó que, de conformidad con la legislación de California, los alegatos podían ser usados en lugar de la declaración testimonial en varias situaciones.

El Tribunal además estableció que el padre no podía cuestionar la procedencia del procedimiento utilizado con relación a la prueba en la apelación, porque no había objetado el uso de declaraciones juradas como prueba en el juicio.

Para la consideración del uso de la prueba testimonial en los procedimientos del Convenio, ver: Beaumont P.R. y McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 en p. 257 y ss.

En virtud de las normas aplicables en la Unión Europea para las sustracciones entre Estados de la UE (Reglamento del Consejo (CE) Nº 2201/2003 (Bruselas II bis)), las solicitudes en virtud del Convenio actualmente están sujetas a disposiciones adicionales, entre ellas el requisito de que se escuche al solicitante antes de denegar la restitución [artículo 11(5) Reglamento de Bruselas II bis], y, que se escuche al niño "durante el proceso, a menos que esto no se considere conveniente habida cuenta de su edad o grado de madurez' [artículo 11(2) Reglamento de Bruselas II bis].

Sustracción por quien ejerce el cuidado principal del menor

Una cuestión controvertida es cómo responder cuando el padre que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor lo sustrae y amenaza con no acompañarlo de regreso al Estado de residencia habitual en caso de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Los tribunales de muchos Estados contratantes han adoptado un enfoque muy estricto, por lo que, salvo en situaciones muy excepcionales, se han rehusado a estimar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) cuando se presenta este argumento relativo a la negativa del sustractor a regresar. Véanse:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 27/02/1996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canadá
M.G. c. R.F., [2002] R.J.Q. 2132 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., [1999] R.D.F. 38 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

En este caso se dictó una resolución de no restitución porque los hechos eran excepcionales. Había habido una amenaza genuina a la madre, que justificadamente le generó temor por su seguridad si regresaba a Israel. Fue engañada y llevada a Israel, vendida a la mafia rusa y revendida al padre, quien la forzó a prostituirse. Fue encerrada, golpeada por el padre, violada y amenazada. Estaba realmente atemorizada, por lo que no podía esperarse que regresara a Israel. Habría sido totalmente inapropiado enviar al niño de regreso sin su madre a un padre que había estado comprando y vendiendo mujeres y llevando adelante un negocio de prostitución.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

No obstante, una sentencia más reciente del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha refinado el enfoque del caso C. v. C.: Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] EWCA Civ 908, [2002] 3 FCR 43 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469].

En este caso, se resolvió que la negativa de una madre a restituir al menor era apta para configurar una defensa, puesto que no constituía un acto carente de razonabilidad, sino que surgía como consecuencia de una enfermedad que ella padecía. Cabe destacar, sin embargo, que aun así se expidió una orden de restitución. En este marco se puede hacer referencia a las sentencias del Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido en Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] y Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. En estas decisiones se aceptó que el temor que una madre podía tener con respecto a la restitución ―aunque no estuviere fundado en riesgos objetivos, pero sí fuere de una intensidad tal como para considerar que el retorno podría afectar sus habilidades de cuidado al punto de que la situación del niño podría volverse intolerable―, en principio, podría ser suficiente para declarar configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b).

Alemania
10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Anteriormente, se había adoptado una interpretación mucho más liberal: 17 UF 260/98, Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suiza
5P.71/2003 /min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P.65/2002/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referenia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. LS. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Reino Unido - Escocia
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Estados Unidos de América
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct. September 24, 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

En otros Estados contratantes, el enfoque adoptado con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución ha sido diferente:

Australia
En Australia, en un principio, la jurisprudencia relativa al Convenio adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución. Véase:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

En la sentencia State Central Authority v. Ardito, de 20 de octubre de 1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], el Tribunal de Familia de Melbourne estimó que la excepción de grave riesgo se encontraba configurada por la negativa de la madre a la restitución, pero, en este caso, a la madre se le había negado la entrada a los Estados Unidos de América, Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Luego de la sentencia dictada por el High Court de Australia (la máxima autoridad judicial en el país), en el marco de las apelaciones conjuntas D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], se prestó más atención a la situación que debe enfrentar el menor luego de la restitución.

En el marco de los casos en que el progenitor sustractor era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor, que luego se niega a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Francia
En Francia, un enfoque permisivo del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido reemplazado por una interpretación mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12.7.1994, S. c. S., Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, No de pourvoi 98-17902 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

Los casos siguientes constituyen ejemplos de la interpretación más estricta:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de pourvoi 02-17411 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de pourvoi 11/01437 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
En la jurisprudencia israelí se han adoptado respuestas divergentes a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución:

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro. v. Ro [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]

A diferencia de:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y. v. D.R. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Polonia
Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 7 de octubre de 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Corte Suprema señaló que privar a la niña del cuidado de su madre, si esta última decidía permanecer en Polonia, era contrario al interés superior de la menor. No obstante, también afirmó que si permanecía en Polonia, estar privada del cuidado de su padre también era contrario a sus intereses. Por estas razones, el Tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que no se podía declarar que la restitución fuera a colocarla en una situación intolerable.

Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 1 de diciembre de 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Corte Suprema precisó que el típico argumento sobre la posible separación del niño del padre privado del menor no es suficiente, en principio, para que se configure la excepción. Declaró que en los casos en los que no existen obstáculos objetivos para que el padre sustractor regrese, se puede presumir que el padre sustractor adjudica una mayor importancia a su propio interés que al interés del niño.

La Corte añadió que el miedo del padre sustractor a incurrir en responsabilidad penal no constituye un obstáculo objetivo a la restitución, ya que se considera que debería haber sido consciente de sus acciones. Sin embargo, la situación se complica cuando los niños son muy pequeños. La Corte declaró que el lazo especial que existe entre la madre y su bebe hace que la separación sea posible solo en casos excepcionales, aun cuando no existan circunstancias objetivas que obstaculicen el regreso de la madre al Estado de residencia habitual. La Corte declaró que en los casos en que la madre de un niño pequeño se niega a la restitución, por la razón que fuere, se deberá desestimar la demanda de retorno sobre la base del artículo 13(1)(b). En base a los hechos del caso, se resolvió en favor de la restitución.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Existen sentencias del TEDH en las que se adoptó un enfoque estricto con respecto a la compatibilidad de las excepciones del Convenio de La Haya con el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). En algunos de estos casos se plantearon argumentos respecto de la cuestión del grave riesgo, incluso en asuntos en los que el padre sustractor ha expresado una negativa a acompañar al niño en el retorno. Véase:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

En este caso, el TEDH acogió la apelación del padre solicitante en donde este planteaba que la negativa de los tribunales turcos a resolver la restitución del menor implicaba una vulneración del artículo 8 del CEDH. El TEDH afirmó que si bien se debe tener en cuenta la corta edad del menor para determinar qué es lo más conveniente para él en un asunto de sustracción, no se puede considerar este criterio por sí solo como justificación suficiente, en el sentido del Convenio de La Haya, para desestimar la demanda de restitución.

Se ha recurrido a pruebas periciales para determinar las consecuencias que pueden resultar de la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05), 6 de diciembre de 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10), 18 de enero de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12), 15 de mayo de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Sin embargo, también cabe señalar que desde la sentencia de la Gran Sala del caso Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland ha habido ejemplos en los que se ha adoptado un enfoque menos estricto. En esta sentencia se había puesto énfasis en el interés superior del niño en el marco de una demanda de restitución, y en determinar si los tribunales nacionales habían llevado a cabo un examen pormenorizado de la situación familiar y una evaluación equilibrada y razonable de los intereses de cada una de las partes. Véanse:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Gran Sala, 6 de julio de 2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), 13 de diciembre de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; y sentencia de la Gran Sala X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), Gran Sala [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11), 10 de julio de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

En este caso, la mayoría sostuvo que el retorno del menor a los Estados Unidos de América constituiría una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Se declaró que el proceso decisorio del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Bélgica con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) no había observado los requisitos procesales inherentes al artículo 8 del CEDH. Los dos jueces que votaron en disidencia resaltaron, no obstante, que el riesgo al que hace referencia el artículo 13 no debe estar relacionado únicamente con la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Protección de los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales

Resumen INCADAT en curso de preparación.

Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas (CDN de la ONU)

Resumen INCADAT en curso de preparación.