CASE

No full text available

Case Name

X. v. Latvia (Application No. 27853/09), Grand Chamber

INCADAT reference

HC/E/LV 1234

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights - Grand Chamber

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Dean Spielmann (President); Nicolas Bratza, Guido Raimondi, Ineta Ziemele, Mark Villiger, Nina Vajić, Khanlar Hajiyev, Danutė Jočienė, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, George Nicolaou, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić, Angelika Nußberger, Julia Laffranque, Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque, Linos-Alexandre Sicilianos (Judges)

States involved

Requesting State

AUSTRALIA

Requested State

LATVIA

Decision

Date

26 November 2013

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

3 11 13(1)(b) 20

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b) 20

Other provisions
Arts 8, 8-1, 8-2, 41 of the ECHR; Art. 644 of the Latvian Civil Procedure Act; Art. 24(2) of the European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights; Brussels IIa Regulation (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003)
Authorities | Cases referred to
Amann v. Switzerland [GC], no. 27798/95, ECHR 2000 II; Artico v. Italy, 13 May 1980, Series A no. 37; B. v. Belgium, no. 4320/11, 10 July 2012; Demir and Baykara v. Turkey [GC), no. 34503/97, ECHR 2008; Eskinazi and Chelouche v. Turkey (dec.), no. 14600/05, ECHR 2005 XIII ; García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, ECHR 1999 I; Hokkanen v. Finland, 23 September 1994, § 55, Series A no. 299-A; Iglesias Gil and A.U.I. v. Spain, no. 56673/00, ECHR 2003 V; Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, 25 January 2000; K. and T. v. Finland [GC], no. 25702/94, ECHR 2001 VII; Kurić and Others v. Slovenia [GC], no. 26828/06, ECHR 2012; Loizidou v. Turkey (Preliminary Objections), 23 March 1995, Series A no. 310; M. R. and L. R. v. Estonia (dec.), no. 13420/12, 15 May 2012; Maire v. Portugal, no. 48206/99, ECHR 2003 VII; Maslov v. Austria [GC], no. 1638/03, ECHR 2008; Maumousseau and Washington v. France, no. 39388/05, 6 December 2007; Nada v. Switzerland [GC], no. 10593/08, 12 September 2012, ECHR 2012; Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, ([GC], no. 41615/07, ECHR 2010; Raban v. Romania, no. 25437/08, 26 October 2010; Slivenko v. Latvia [GC], no. 48321/99, ECHR 2003; Šneersone and Kampanella, no. 14737/09, 12 July 2011.

INCADAT comment

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Inchoate Rights of Custody

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms
Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The application concerned a child born in Australia in February 2005 to a Latvian mother and an Australian father. The mother had met the father in early 2004 and moved into his flat at the end of the year when she was in a late stage of pregnancy. The relationship between the parties deteriorated. The mother continued to live in the father's apartment as a tenant.

On 17 July 2008 the mother left Australia with the child and returned to Latvia without the father's consent. On 22 September a return petition was filed with the Latvian Central Authority. On 6 November the Family Court of Australia ruled that the parents had joint parental responsibility for the child. The mother did not appeal this ruling.

On 19 November the Rīga City Zemgale District Court ordered the return of the child. It held that the Australian decision on the father's parental responsibility was not subject to review by the Latvian courts and dismissed the mother's claim that returning to Australia would expose the child to psychological harm.

On appeal, the mother relied on a psychologist's report which stated that the child could suffer psychological trauma as a result of being separated from her mother. She argued that in law and in practice she had been the child's sole guardian prior to their departure from Australia and alleged that the father had mistreated them.

She also claimed that the father had previous convictions and had been charged with corruption, allegations which had not been investigated by the lower court. Neither had the court enquired into the measures which would guarantee the child's safety on being returned to Australia. Furthermore, the mother pointed out that the child attended pre-school activities in Latvia and spoke Latvian as her native language. In Australia, the mother would be unemployed and would not be able to support herself and the child.

On 26 January 2009 the Rīga Regional Court (Rīgas Apgabaltiesa) dismissed the mother's appeal. It held that there was no evidence to substantiate her allegations of mistreatment and pending criminal charges. Furthermore, as the issue before the court concerned the return of the child under the Hague Convention and not custody rights, it was not required to determine the risk of psychological harm.

There was no evidence to suggest that returning to Australia would threaten the child's safety as Australian legislation provided for the security of children and their protection against mistreatment within the family. The mother applied to suspend the return order for six to twelve months.

In March 2009, the father went to Latvia in an attempt to see the child. He executed the return order himself. He took the child and drove to Tallinn, Estonia in order to travel back to Australia. At the mother's request, the Latvian police instigated criminal abduction proceedings but did not bring charges against the father.

In September 2009, the Family Court of Australia awarded the father sole parental responsibility. The mother was permitted to visit the child under the supervision of a social worker. However, the court prohibited her from speaking to the child in Latvian and, until the child's eleventh birthday, from communicating with any childcare facility, school or parent of a child attending the same institution.

Before the European Court of Human Rights, the mother complained under Article 6 that the proceedings before the Latvian courts had not been fair. She argued that the courts had erred in interpreting and applying the Hague Convention. Furthermore, that they had disregarded her evidence concerning the best interests of the child and the fact that she was the child's sole guardian at the time of the removal from Australia.

Instead, they had relied solely on the evidence of the father and had refused to obtain the evidence requested by the mother, thereby infringing the principle of equality of arms. The Court considered the mother's allegations under Article 8 which protected her right to respect for family life.

On 13 December 2011, by a majority of five to two, the Third Section of the ECtHR held that Latvia had violated Article 8 of the ECHR in failing to take account of various relevant factors in assessing the best interests of the child. The Court also awarded the mother compensation under Article 41, see: X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), [2012] 1 F.L.R. 860 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146].

On 13 March 2012 the Latvian Government requested that the case be referred to the Grand Chamber, in accordance with Article 43 ECHR. This request was accepted by the panel of the Grand Chamber on 4 June 2012. According to a Latvian press report, referred to before the Grand Chamber, the mother had returned to Australia and was in regular contact with her daughter, and had been able to see her without a social worker being present.

Ruling

The Grand Chamber held by 9 votes to 8 that there had been a violation of Article 8 of the ECHR.

INCADAT comment

See the chamber judgment in this case dated 13 December 2011: X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]. 

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Inchoate Rights of Custody

The reliance on 'inchoate custody rights', to afford a Convention remedy to applicants who have actively cared for removed or retained children, but who do not possess legal custody rights, was first identified in the English decision:

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 4],

and has subsequently been followed in that jurisdiction in:

Re O. (Child Abduction: Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 505].

The concept has been the subject of judicial consideration in:

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 506].

In one English first instance decision: Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 265], it was questioned whether the concept was in accordance with the decision of the House of Lords in Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 2] where it was held that de facto custody was not sufficient to amount to rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

The concept of 'inchoate custody rights', has attracted support and opposition in other Contracting States.

The concept has attracted support in a New Zealand first instance case: Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 471].

However, the concept was specifically rejected by the majority of the Irish Supreme Court in the decision of: H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 284].

Keane J. stated that it would go too far to accept that there was 'an undefined hinterland of inchoate rights of custody not attributed in any sense by the law of the requesting state to the party asserting them or to the court itself, but regard by the court of the requested state as being capable of protection under the terms of the Convention.'

The Court of Justice of the European Union has subsequently upheld the position adopted by the Irish Courts:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

In its ruling the European Court noted that the attribution of rights of custody, which were not accorded to an unmarried father under national law, would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the mother. 

This formulation leaves open the status of ‘incohate rights’ in a EU Member State where the concept had become part of national law.  The United Kingdom (England & Wales) would fall into this category, but it must be recalled that pursuant to the terms of Protocol (No. 30) on the Application of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union to Poland and to the United Kingdom (OJ C 115/313, 9 May 2008), the CJEU could not in any event make a finding of inconsistency with regard to UK law vis-a-vis Charter rights. 

For academic criticism of the concept of inchoate rights see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' Oxford, OUP, 1999, at p. 60.

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Protection of Human rights & Fundamental Freedoms

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né en Australie en février 2005 d'une mère lettone et d'un père australien. La mère avait rencontré le père début 2004 et s'était installée chez lui à la fin de l'année alors qu'elle était presque au terme de sa grossesse. Les relations entre les parties se dégradèrent. La mère continua de vivre dans l'appartement du père en qualité de locataire.

Le 17 juillet 2008, la mère quitta l'Australie avec l'enfant pour se rendre en Lettonie sans le consentement du père. Le 22 septembre, une demande de retour fut introduite auprès de l'Autorité centrale lettone. Le 6 novembre, le Tribunal de la famille (Family Court) d'Australie jugea que les parents avaient l'autorité parentale conjointe de l'enfant. La mère ne fit pas appel de cette décision.

Le 19 novembre, le Tribunal de l'arrondissement de Zemgale de la ville de Riga ordonna le retour de l'enfant, estimant que les juridictions lettones ne pouvaient pas réexaminer la décision australienne concernant la responsabilité parentale du père et rejetant l'argument, avancé par la mère, d'un risque de danger psychologique pour l'enfant en cas de retour en Australie.

En appel, la mère s'appuya sur le rapport d'un psychologue qui déclarait que l'enfant pourrait subir un traumatisme psychologique s'il était séparé de sa mère. Elle allégua qu'en droit et en fait, elle avait été le seul gardien de l'enfant avant qu'ils quittent l'Australie et que le père les avait maltraités.

Elle allégua en outre que le père avait été précédemment condamné et avait été mis en examen pour corruption, allégations que la juridiction inférieure n'avaient pas examinées. Celle-ci ne s'était pas non plus enquise des mesures qui garantiraient la sécurité de l'enfant à son retour en Australie.

Enfin, la mère souligna que l'enfant, une fille, suivait des activités préscolaires en Lettonie et qu'elle parlait le letton, sa langue maternelle. En Australie, la mère n'aurait pas d'emploi et ne serait pas capable de subvenir aux besoins de son enfant et aux siens.

Le 26 janvier 2009, la Cour régionale de Riga (Rīgas Apgabaltiesa) rejeta l'appel de la mère. Elle jugea qu'aucun élément n'étayait ses allégations de maltraitance et d'accusations pénales. En outre, puisque la question qui lui était soumise concernait le retour de l'enfant en vertu de la Convention de La Haye et non les droits de garde, la Cour n'avait pas à statuer sur le risque de danger psychologique.

Aucun élément n'indiquait qu'un retour en Australie menacerait la sécurité de l'enfant car la législation australienne prévoit des dispositions pour la sécurité des enfants et leur protection contre la maltraitance au sein de la famille. La mère demanda la suspension de l'ordonnance de retour pour six à douze mois.

En mars 2009, le père se rendit en Lettonie pour tenter de voir l'enfant. Il exécuta lui-même l'ordonnance de retour. Il prit l'enfant et roula jusqu'à Tallinn, en Estonie, en vue de retourner en Australie. À la demande de la mère, la police lettone engagea des poursuites pour enlèvement mais n'inculpa pas le père.

En septembre 2009, le Tribunal de la famille d'Australie accorda la responsabilité parentale exclusive au père. La mère fut autorisée à rendre visite à l'enfant sous la supervision d'un travailleur social. Cependant, le Tribunal lui interdit de parler à l'enfant en letton et, jusqu'au onzième anniversaire de celui-ci, de communiquer avec tout service de prise en charge des enfants, école ou parent d'un enfant fréquentant le même établissement.

Devant la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH), la mère se plaignit sur le fondement de l'article 6 de la CEDH que la procédure devant les juridictions lettones n'avait pas été équitable. Elle allégua que les juridictions avaient commis une erreur dans l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention de La Haye et qu'elles n'avaient pas tenu compte des éléments qu'elle présentait concernant l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant et le fait qu'elle était le seul gardien de l'enfant au moment du déplacement.

Au contraire, elles s'étaient uniquement appuyées sur les preuves apportées par le père et avaient refusé de se procurer les preuves demandées par la mère, en violation du principe de l'égalité des armes. La CourEDH considéra les allégations de la mère en vertu de l'article 8 qui protégeait son droit au respect de sa vie de famille.

Le 13 décembre 2011, par une majorité de cinq contre deux, la troisième section de la CourEDH jugea que la Lettonie avait violé l'article 8 de la CEDH en ne tenant pas compte de divers facteurs pertinents pour apprécier l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Elle accorda également à la mère une compensation sur le fondement de l'article 41, voir : X. c. Lettonie (Requête No 27853/09), [2012] 1 F.L.R. 860 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1146].

Le 13 mars 2012, le Gouvernement letton demanda le renvoi de l'affaire devant la Grande Chambre, conformément à l'article 43 de la CEDH. Cette demande fut acceptée par le collège de la Grande Chambre le 4 juin 2012. Selon un article paru dans la presse lettone, qui fut évoqué devant la Grande Chambre, la mère était retournée en Australie ; elle était en contact régulier avec sa fille et avait pu la voir sans la présence d'un travailleur social.

Dispositif

La Grande Chambre a jugé par 9 voix contre 8 qu'il y avait eu violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH.

Commentaire INCADAT

Voir aussi dans cette affaire l'arrêt de chambre du 13 décembre 2011 : Affaire X c. Lettonie (Requête No 27853/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Droit de garde implicite

La notion de « droit de garde implicite », laquelle permet à certaines parties non-gardiennes s'étant activement occupées d'enfants finalement déplacés ou retenus à l'étranger de faire utilement valoir une demande de retour sur le fondement de la Convention a vu le jour dans l'affaire Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 4].

La notion a été réutilisée dans :

Re O. (Child Abduction : Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 505].

Le concept de droit de garde implicite a également été discuté dans :

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 506].

Dans une autre décision anglaise de première instance, Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 265], la question s'était posée de savoir si ce concept était conforme à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans l'affaire Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 2]. Dans cette espèce, il fut considéré que la garde factuelle d'un enfant ne suffisait pas à représenter un véritable droit de garde au sens de la Convention.

Le concept de « droit de garde implicite » a été diversement accueilli à l'étranger.

Il a été bien accueilli dans la décision néo-zélandaise rendue en première instance dans l'affaire Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 471].

Toutefois, ce concept a été clairement rejeté par la majorité de la cour suprême irlandaise dans l'affaire H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 284]. Keane J. a estimé que « ce serait aller trop loin que de considérer que de mystérieux droits de garde implicites non reconnus officiellement par le droit de l'État requérant à une juridiction ou une partie les invoquant puissent être regardés par les juridictions de l'État requis comme susceptible de bénéficier de la protection conventionnelle. » [Traduction du Bureau Permanent]

La Cour de justice de l'Union européenne a confirmé par la suite la position adoptée par les tribunaux irlandais:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a indiqué dans sa décision que l'attribution des droits de garde, qui en vertu de la législation nationale ne pouvaient être attribués à un père non marié, serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux de la mère.

Cette formulation laisse ouverte la question du statut du droit de garde implicite dans un État membre de l'Union européenne lorsque ce concept a été intégré au droit national. C'est le cas du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), mais il convient de rappeler que conformément au Protocole (No 30) sur l'application de la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne à la Pologne et au Royaume-Uni (OJ C 115/313, 9 Mai 2008), la CJUE ne pourrait en aucun cas constater une incompatibilité du droit britannique vis-à-vis de la Charte.

Pour une critique de ce droit, voir : P. Beaumont. et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 60.

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

Sauvegarde des droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Hechos

La demanda trataba sobre una niña nacida en Australia en febrero de 2005 de madre letona y padre australiano. La madre había conocido al padre a principios de 2004 y, a fines del mismo año, se había mudado al apartamento del padre en la etapa final del embarazo. La relación se deterioró y la madre continuó viviendo allí en calidad de locataria.

El 17 de julio de 2008, la madre dejó Australia con la niña y regresó a Letonia sin el consentimiento del padre. El 22 de septiembre, se presentó una demanda de restitución ante la Autoridad Central de Letonia. El 6 de noviembre, el Tribunal de familia de Australia declaró que los progenitores tenían responsabilidad parental conjunta, y la madre no interpuso recurso de apelación contra ese pronunciamiento.

El 19 de noviembre, el Tribunal del distrito de Zemgale de la Ciudad de Riga ordenó la restitución de la niña. Declaró que el pronunciamiento australiano sobre la responsabilidad parental del padre no podía ser objeto de revisión por parte de los tribunales letones, y desestimó la alegación de la madre que consistía en que el regreso a Australia expondría a la niña a sufrir daño psicológico.

En la apelación, la madre se valió de un informe de un psicólogo en donde constaba que la niña podía sufrir trauma psicológico si se la separaba de ella. Alegó que, en los hechos y en el derecho, solo ella había ejercido la responsabilidad parental antes de dejar Australia, y que ambas habían sido maltratadas por el padre.

Además, adujo que el padre había sido condenado e investigado por corrupción, que estas alegaciones no habían sido investigadas por el tribunal a quo, y que éste último tampoco había examinado las medidas que garantizarían la seguridad de la niña cuando regresara a Australia. La madre señaló, además, que su hija asistía a la educación preescolar en Letonia y que su lengua materna era el letón. En Australia, no tendría empleo ni podría proveer para sí misma y la niña.

El 26 de enero de 2009 el Tribunal regional de Riga (Rīgas Apgabaltiesa) desestimó el recurso de apelación de la madre. Determinó que no se acreditaron pruebas que fundamentasen sus alegaciones de maltrato y las supuestas causas penales pendientes del padre. Además, como el asunto ante el tribunal versaba sobre la restitución de la niña en virtud del Convenio de La Haya y no sobre los derechos de custodia, no se requería determinar el riesgo de daño psicológico.

No se acreditaron pruebas de que el regreso a Australia supondría una amenaza para la seguridad de la niña, ya que la legislación australiana prevé disposiciones de seguridad para los niños y de protección del maltrato en el ámbito familiar. La madre presentó entonces una solicitud para suspender la orden de restitución por seis a doce meses.

En marzo de 2009, el padre fue a Letonia con el objetivo de ver a la niña y él mismo dio ejecución a la orden de restitución: tomó a su hija y condujo a Tallin, Estonia para emprender el viaje de regreso a Australia. A pedido de la madre, la policía letona inició un procedimiento penal por sustracción, pero sin imputar al padre.

En septiembre de 2009, el Tribunal de familia de Australia otorgó al padre la responsabilidad parental exclusiva y autorizó a la madre a visitar a la niña con la supervisión de un trabajador social. No obstante, le impuso la prohibición de hablarle en letón y de comunicarse con todo establecimiento de cuidado infantil, escuela o con un padre de un niño que asistiere al mismo establecimiento.

Ante el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, la madre fundó su queja de que el procedimiento ante los tribunales letones no había sido equitativo sobre la base del artículo 6. Adujo que los tribunales habían interpretado y aplicado el Convenio de la Haya de forma errónea, y que no habían tenido en cuenta sus pruebas con respecto al interés superior del niño y al hecho de que ella ejercía la responsabilidad parental exclusiva antes del traslado de la menor a Letonia.

En lugar de ello, los tribunales se habían basado solamente en las pruebas presentadas por el padre y habían denegado la obtención de las pruebas que ella solicitaba, vulnerando así el principio de igualdad de armas. El TEDH consideró las alegaciones de la madre a la luz del artículo 8 que protegía su derecho al respeto de su vida familiar.

El 13 de diciembre de 2011, por cinco votos a favor y dos en contra, la Sección Tercera del TEDH declaró que Letonia había vulnerado el artículo 8 del CEDH al no haber tomado en consideración varios factores relevantes en su evaluación del interés superior de la niña. Además, el Tribunal concedió a la madre una indemnización en razón del artículo 41. Véase X. v. Latvia (demanda N° 27853/09), [2012] 1 F.L.R. 860 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146].

El 13 de marzo de 2012, el Gobierno de Letonia solicitó la remisión del asunto ante la Gran Sala, de conformidad con el artículo 43 del CEDH, solicitud que fue aceptada por el colegio de la Gran Sala el 4 de junio de 2012. Según un artículo de la prensa letona al que se hizo referencia ante la Gran Sala, la madre había regresado a Australia, visitaba a su hija periódicamente y la había podido ver sin la presencia de un trabajador social.

Fallo

Por nueve votos a favor y ocho en contra, la Gran Sala declaró vulnerado el artículo 8 del CEDH.

Comentario INCADAT

Véase la sentencia de la Sala de fecha 13 de diciembre de 2011: X. v. Latvia (demanda No 27853/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146].

Fallos del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)

Derechos de custodia imperfectos

La invocación de "derechos de custodia imperfectos" para que pueda activarse el mecanismo convencional para solicitantes que han cuidado activamente de menores trasladados o retenidos pero que carecen de derechos de custodia, fue identificada por primera vez en la decisión inglesa:

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 4],

y seguida posteriormente en dicha jurisdicción en:

Re O. (Child Abduction: Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 505].

El concepto ha sido objeto de consideración judicial en:

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 506].

En una decisión inglesa de primera instancia, Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 265], se puso en duda si el concepto era congruente con la decisión de la Cámara de los Lores en Re J. (A Minor)(Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2], donde se sostuvo que la custodia de facto no era suficiente para constituir derechos de custodia en el sentido del Convenio.

El concepto de "derechos de custodia imperfectos" ha suscitado tanto apoyo como oposición en otros Estados contratantes.

El concepto obtuvo apoyo en la decisión de primera instancia de Nueva Zelanda:
Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 471].

Sin embargo, el concepto fue expresamente rechazado por la mayoría del Tribunal Supremo de Irlanda en la decisión de: H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 284].

Keane J. afirmó que sería ir demasiado lejos aceptar que había "un área remota indefinida de derechos de custodia imperfectos no atribuidos en ningún sentido por el Derecho del Estado requirente a la parte que los invoca o al propio tribunal, sino un reconocimiento por parte del Estado requerido de su capacidad de protección según los términos del Convenio."

Para una crítica académica del concepto, véase:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, en p. 60. Actualizado el 31 de marzo de 2005 y el 17 de febrero de 2009.

Sustracción por quien ejerce el cuidado principal del menor

Una cuestión controvertida es cómo responder cuando el padre que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor lo sustrae y amenaza con no acompañarlo de regreso al Estado de residencia habitual en caso de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Los tribunales de muchos Estados contratantes han adoptado un enfoque muy estricto, por lo que, salvo en situaciones muy excepcionales, se han rehusado a estimar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) cuando se presenta este argumento relativo a la negativa del sustractor a regresar. Véanse:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 27/02/1996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canadá
M.G. c. R.F., [2002] R.J.Q. 2132 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., [1999] R.D.F. 38 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

En este caso se dictó una resolución de no restitución porque los hechos eran excepcionales. Había habido una amenaza genuina a la madre, que justificadamente le generó temor por su seguridad si regresaba a Israel. Fue engañada y llevada a Israel, vendida a la mafia rusa y revendida al padre, quien la forzó a prostituirse. Fue encerrada, golpeada por el padre, violada y amenazada. Estaba realmente atemorizada, por lo que no podía esperarse que regresara a Israel. Habría sido totalmente inapropiado enviar al niño de regreso sin su madre a un padre que había estado comprando y vendiendo mujeres y llevando adelante un negocio de prostitución.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

No obstante, una sentencia más reciente del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha refinado el enfoque del caso C. v. C.: Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] EWCA Civ 908, [2002] 3 FCR 43 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469].

En este caso, se resolvió que la negativa de una madre a restituir al menor era apta para configurar una defensa, puesto que no constituía un acto carente de razonabilidad, sino que surgía como consecuencia de una enfermedad que ella padecía. Cabe destacar, sin embargo, que aun así se expidió una orden de restitución. En este marco se puede hacer referencia a las sentencias del Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido en Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] y Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. En estas decisiones se aceptó que el temor que una madre podía tener con respecto a la restitución ―aunque no estuviere fundado en riesgos objetivos, pero sí fuere de una intensidad tal como para considerar que el retorno podría afectar sus habilidades de cuidado al punto de que la situación del niño podría volverse intolerable―, en principio, podría ser suficiente para declarar configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b).

Alemania
10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Anteriormente, se había adoptado una interpretación mucho más liberal: 17 UF 260/98, Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suiza
5P.71/2003 /min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P.65/2002/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referenia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. LS. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Reino Unido - Escocia
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Estados Unidos de América
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct. September 24, 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

En otros Estados contratantes, el enfoque adoptado con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución ha sido diferente:

Australia
En Australia, en un principio, la jurisprudencia relativa al Convenio adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución. Véase:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

En la sentencia State Central Authority v. Ardito, de 20 de octubre de 1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], el Tribunal de Familia de Melbourne estimó que la excepción de grave riesgo se encontraba configurada por la negativa de la madre a la restitución, pero, en este caso, a la madre se le había negado la entrada a los Estados Unidos de América, Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Luego de la sentencia dictada por el High Court de Australia (la máxima autoridad judicial en el país), en el marco de las apelaciones conjuntas D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], se prestó más atención a la situación que debe enfrentar el menor luego de la restitución.

En el marco de los casos en que el progenitor sustractor era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor, que luego se niega a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Francia
En Francia, un enfoque permisivo del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido reemplazado por una interpretación mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12.7.1994, S. c. S., Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, No de pourvoi 98-17902 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

Los casos siguientes constituyen ejemplos de la interpretación más estricta:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de pourvoi 02-17411 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de pourvoi 11/01437 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
En la jurisprudencia israelí se han adoptado respuestas divergentes a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución:

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro. v. Ro [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]

A diferencia de:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y. v. D.R. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Polonia
Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 7 de octubre de 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Corte Suprema señaló que privar a la niña del cuidado de su madre, si esta última decidía permanecer en Polonia, era contrario al interés superior de la menor. No obstante, también afirmó que si permanecía en Polonia, estar privada del cuidado de su padre también era contrario a sus intereses. Por estas razones, el Tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que no se podía declarar que la restitución fuera a colocarla en una situación intolerable.

Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 1 de diciembre de 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Corte Suprema precisó que el típico argumento sobre la posible separación del niño del padre privado del menor no es suficiente, en principio, para que se configure la excepción. Declaró que en los casos en los que no existen obstáculos objetivos para que el padre sustractor regrese, se puede presumir que el padre sustractor adjudica una mayor importancia a su propio interés que al interés del niño.

La Corte añadió que el miedo del padre sustractor a incurrir en responsabilidad penal no constituye un obstáculo objetivo a la restitución, ya que se considera que debería haber sido consciente de sus acciones. Sin embargo, la situación se complica cuando los niños son muy pequeños. La Corte declaró que el lazo especial que existe entre la madre y su bebe hace que la separación sea posible solo en casos excepcionales, aun cuando no existan circunstancias objetivas que obstaculicen el regreso de la madre al Estado de residencia habitual. La Corte declaró que en los casos en que la madre de un niño pequeño se niega a la restitución, por la razón que fuere, se deberá desestimar la demanda de retorno sobre la base del artículo 13(1)(b). En base a los hechos del caso, se resolvió en favor de la restitución.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Existen sentencias del TEDH en las que se adoptó un enfoque estricto con respecto a la compatibilidad de las excepciones del Convenio de La Haya con el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). En algunos de estos casos se plantearon argumentos respecto de la cuestión del grave riesgo, incluso en asuntos en los que el padre sustractor ha expresado una negativa a acompañar al niño en el retorno. Véase:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

En este caso, el TEDH acogió la apelación del padre solicitante en donde este planteaba que la negativa de los tribunales turcos a resolver la restitución del menor implicaba una vulneración del artículo 8 del CEDH. El TEDH afirmó que si bien se debe tener en cuenta la corta edad del menor para determinar qué es lo más conveniente para él en un asunto de sustracción, no se puede considerar este criterio por sí solo como justificación suficiente, en el sentido del Convenio de La Haya, para desestimar la demanda de restitución.

Se ha recurrido a pruebas periciales para determinar las consecuencias que pueden resultar de la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05), 6 de diciembre de 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10), 18 de enero de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12), 15 de mayo de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Sin embargo, también cabe señalar que desde la sentencia de la Gran Sala del caso Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland ha habido ejemplos en los que se ha adoptado un enfoque menos estricto. En esta sentencia se había puesto énfasis en el interés superior del niño en el marco de una demanda de restitución, y en determinar si los tribunales nacionales habían llevado a cabo un examen pormenorizado de la situación familiar y una evaluación equilibrada y razonable de los intereses de cada una de las partes. Véanse:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Gran Sala, 6 de julio de 2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), 13 de diciembre de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; y sentencia de la Gran Sala X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), Gran Sala [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11), 10 de julio de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

En este caso, la mayoría sostuvo que el retorno del menor a los Estados Unidos de América constituiría una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Se declaró que el proceso decisorio del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Bélgica con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) no había observado los requisitos procesales inherentes al artículo 8 del CEDH. Los dos jueces que votaron en disidencia resaltaron, no obstante, que el riesgo al que hace referencia el artículo 13 no debe estar relacionado únicamente con la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Protección de los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales

Resumen INCADAT en curso de preparación.