CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy (Application No 14737/09)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/LV 1152

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Françoise Tulkens (President); David Thór Björgvinsson, Dragoljub Popović, Giorgio Malinverni, András Sajó, Guido Raimondi, Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque (Judges); Stanley Naismith (Section Registrar)

States involved

Requesting State

ITALY

Requested State

LATVIA

Decision

Date

12 July 2012

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

3 4 6 7 11 12 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2) 20 13(3)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Bianchi v. Switzerland, no. 7548/04; Carlson v. Switzerland, no. 49492/06; Deak v. Romania and the United Kingdom, no. 19055/05, (2008) 47 E.H.R.R. 50; Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, A/274-A, (1994) 18 E.H.R.R. 213; Elsholz v. Germany, no. 25735/94, (2002) 34 E.H.R.R. 58; Eskinazi and Chelouche v. Turkey, no. 14600/05; Gnahoré v. France, no. 40031/98, (2002) 34 E.H.R.R. 38; Hokkanen v. Finland, A/299-A, (1995) 19 E.H.R.R. 139; Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, (2001) 31 E.H.R.R. 7; Iosub Caras v. Romania, no. 7198/04, (2008) 47 E.H.R.R. 35; Kutzner v. Germany, no. 46544/99, (2002) 35 E.H.R.R. 25; Lipkowsky and McCormack v. Germany, no. 26755/10; Maire v. Portugal, no. 48206/99, (2006) 43 E.H.R.R. 13; Maršálek v. the Czech Republic, no. 8153/04; Maumousseau and Washington v. France no. 39388/05, (2010) 51 E.H.R.R. 35; Moretti and Benedetti v. Italy, no. 16318/07; Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, no. 41615/07, [2011] 1 F.L.R. 122; Raban v. Romania, no. 25437/08, [2011] 1 F.L.R. 1130; S.D., D.P. and A.T. v. the United Kingdom, no. 23715/94, Commission decision of 20 May 1996, unreported; Selmouni v. France, no. 25803/94, (2000) 29 E.H.R.R. 403; Streletz, Kessler and Krenz v. Germany, nos. 34044/96, 35532/97 and 44801/98, (2001) 33 E.H.R.R. 31; Tiemann v. France and Germany, nos. 47457/99 and 47458/99; Yakup Köse v. Turkey, no. 50177/99.
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

Brussels IIa Regulation (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003)
Brussels II a Regulation
European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Economic Factors

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Undertakings

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The case concerned a child born in Italy in 2002 to a Latvian mother and an Italian father. The parents never married and separated in 2003. The mother contended that the father had played a minimal role in raising the child. On 20 September 2004 the Rome Youth Court granted sole custody of the child to the mother and rights of access to the father. On 3 February 2006 the Italian Court ruled that the father had to make child support payments. He failed to do so. The mother complained to the Italian police on 8 April 2006.

The mother's only income came from her family in Latvia. These payments ended in December 2005 leaving her with no means of supporting herself in Italy. As a result, she returned to Latvia with the child in April 2006. The father applied to the Rome Youth Court for interim sole custody and for the return of the child to Italy. The Court upheld the father's request and scheduled a hearing for 25 October 2006. Although the Court did not have jurisdiction to order the return of the child it held that he should reside with his father. The mother alleged that she was not notified of the hearing.

On 16 January 2007, the father commenced proceedings under the 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention for the return of the child to Italy. The Latvian Central Authority held that this would not be in the child's best interests. He had settled in Latvia and his living conditions there were beneficial to his growth and development. Furthermore, the mother was providing for his emotional and physical development.

On 11 April 2007, the Latvian Court refused the father's application to return the child to Italy. It held that a defence under Article 13(1)(b) of the Hague Convention had been established. Financial constraints prevented the mother from accompanying the child back to Italy while the safeguards offered by Italy could not guarantee that the child would be protected from psychological harm arising from his separation from his mother. Consequently, Article 11(4) of the Brussels IIa Regulation (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003) had not been fulfilled.

On 7 August 2007, the father applied to the Rome Youth Court under Article 11 of the Brussels IIa Regulation to issue an immediately enforceable decision ordering the return of the child to Italy. The Court found in his favour and considered the safeguards offered by the father to be adequate to protect the child from any risks arising from his return. The decision was upheld on appeal on 21 April 2008. On 15 October 2008 the Republic of Latvia brought an action against Italy before the European Commission in application of Article 227 of the Treaty Establishing the European Community.  It alleged that the Rome Youth Court had failed to comply with the Brussels IIa Regulation by failing to hear either the mother or child as part of the proceedings and by ignoring the decisions of the Latvian courts.

The Commission rejected the claim. There was no indication that returning the child to live with his father in Italy would expose him to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place him in an intolerable situation. Furthermore, the Italian Court had set out specific obligations on the father designed to protect the child from any risk of harm and to enable contact with both parents. Referring to case law of the European Court of Human Rights (Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, (1994) 18 E.H.R.R. 213), the Commission considered that the use of written proceedings was permissible as long as the principle of equality of arms was observed.

The Commission observed that the mother had been given an opportunity to submit written observations on equal grounds with the child's father and thus neither the Brussels IIa Regulation nor the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child had had been violated. Before the European Court of Human Rights, mother and child complained under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) that the Italian courts' decisions ordering the child's return to Italy were contrary to his best interests as well as in violation of international and Latvian law. They further complained under Article 6 about the procedural fairness of decision-making in Italian courts. In particular, they were critical of the fact that the mother was not present at the hearing of the Rome Youth Court.

Ruling

The European Court of Human Rights held by six votes to one that there had been a violation of Article 8 of the ECHR on account of the Italian courts' order for the child to be returned to Italy; and unanimously that there had been no violation of Article 8 on account of the mother's absence from the hearing of the Rome Youth Court. Damages were awarded to mother and child.

INCADAT comment

Brussels II a Regulation

The application of the 1980 Hague Convention within the Member States of the European Union (Denmark excepted) has been amended following the entry into force of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003 concerning jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in matrimonial matters and the matters of parental responsibility, repealing Regulation (EC) No 1347/2000, see:

Affaire C-195/08 PPU Rinau v. Rinau, [2008] ECR I 5271 [2008] 2 FLR 1495 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 987];

Affaire C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1327].

The Hague Convention remains the primary tool to combat child abductions within the European Union but its operation has been fine tuned.

An autonomous EU definition of ‘rights of custody' has been adopted: Article 2(9) of the Brussels II a Regulation, which is essentially the same as that found in Article 5 a) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention. There is equally an EU formula for determining the wrongfulness of a removal or retention: Article 2(11) of the Regulation. The latter embodies the key elements of Article 3 of the Convention, but adds an explanation as to the joint exercise of custody rights, an explanation which accords with international case law.

See: Case C-400/10 PPU J Mc.B. v. L.E, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

Of greater significance is Article 11 of the Brussels II a Regulation.

Article 11(2) of the Brussels II a Regulation requires that when applying Articles 12 and 13 of the 1980 Hague Convention that the child is given the opportunity to be heard during the proceedings, unless this appears inappropriate having regard to his age or degree of maturity.

This obligation has led to a realignment in judicial practice in England, see:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880] where Baroness Hale noted that the reform would lead to children being heard more frequently in Hague cases than had hitherto happened.

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72,  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901]

The Court of Appeal endorsed the suggestion by Baroness Hale that the requirement under the Brussels II a Regulation to ascertain the views of children of sufficient age of maturity was not restricted to intra-European Community cases of child abduction, but was a principle of universal application.

Article 11(3) of the Brussels II a Regulation requires Convention proceedings to be dealt with within 6 weeks.

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 931]

Thorpe LJ held that this extended to appeal hearings and as such recommended that applications for permission to appeal should be made directly to the trial judge and that the normal 21 day period for lodging a notice of appeal should be restricted.

Article 11(4) of the Brussels II a Regulation provides that the return of a child cannot be refused under Article 13(1) b) of the Hague Convention if it is established that adequate arrangements have been made to secure the protection of the child after his return.

Cases in which reliance has been placed on Article 11(4) of the Brussels II a Regulation to make a return order include:

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947];

CA Paris 15 février 2007 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 979].

The relevant protection was found not to exist, leading to a non-return order being made, in:

CA Aix-en-Provence, 30 novembre 2006, N° RG 06/03661 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 717].

The most notable element of Article 11 is the new mechanism which is now applied where a non-return order is made on the basis of Article 13.  This allows the authorities in the State of the child's habitual residence to rule on whether the child should be sent back notwithstanding the non-return order.  If a subsequent return order is made under Article 11(7) of the Regulation, and is certified by the issuing judge, then it will be automatically enforceable in the State of refuge and all other EU-Member States.

Article 11(7) Brussels II a Regulation - Return Order Granted:

Re A. (Custody Decision after Maltese Non-return Order: Brussels II Revised) [2006] EWHC 3397 (Fam.), [2007] 1 FLR 1923 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 883]

Article 11(7) Brussels II a Regulation - Return Order Refused:

Re A. H.A. v. M.B. (Brussels II Revised: Article 11(7) Application) [2007] EWHC 2016 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 289, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 930].

The CJEU has ruled that a subsequent return order does not have to be a final order for custody:

Case C-211/10 PPU Povse v. Alpago, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1328].

In this case it was further held that the enforcement of a return order cannot be refused as a result of a change of circumstances.  Such a change must be raised before the competent court in the Member State of origin.

Furthermore abducting parents may not seek to subvert the deterrent effect of Council Regulation 2201/2003 in seeking to obtain provisional measures to prevent the enforcement of a custody order aimed at securing the return of an abducted child:

Case C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1327].

For academic commentary on the new EU regime see:

P. McEleavy ‘The New Child Abduction Regime in the European Community: Symbiotic Relationship or Forced Partnership?' [2005] Journal of Private International Law 5 - 34.

Economic Factors

Article 13(1)(b) and Economic Factors

There are many examples, from a broad range of Contracting States, where courts have declined to uphold the Article 13(1)(b) exception where it has been argued that the taking parent (and hence the children) would be placed in a difficult financial situation were a return order to be made.

Australia
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]

The fact that the mother could not accompany the child to England for financial reasons or otherwise was no reason for non-compliance with the clear obligation that rests upon the Australian courts under the terms of the Convention.

Canada
Y.D. v. J.B. [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que. C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 369]

Financial weakness was not a valid reason for refusing to return a child. The Court stated: "The signatories to the Convention did not have in mind the protection of children of well-off parents only, leaving exposed and incapable of applying for the return of a wrongfully removed child the parent without wealth whose child was so abducted."

France
CA Lyon, 19 septembre 2011, No de RG 11/02919 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1168]

The existence of more favourable living conditions in France could not be taken into consideration.

Germany
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 821]

New Zealand
K.M.A. v. Secretary for Justice [2007] NZFLR 891 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 1118]

Financial hardship was not proven on the facts; moreover, the Court of Appeal considered it most unlikely that the Australian authorities would not provide some form of special financial and legal assistance, if required.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
In early case law, the Court of Appeal repeatedly rejected arguments that economic factors could justify finding the existence of an intolerable situation for the purposes of Article 13(1)(b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 48]

In this case, the court decided that dependency on State benefits cannot be said in itself to constitute an intolerable situation.

B. v. B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 32, [1993] 2 All ER 144, [1993] 1 FLR 238, [1993] Fam Law 198 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 10]

In this case, it was said that inadequate housing / financial circumstances did not prevent return.

Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 20]

The Court suggested that the exception might be established were young children to be left homeless, and without recourse to State benefits. However, to be dependent on Israeli State benefits, or English State benefits, could not be said to constitute an intolerable situation.

United Kingdom - Scotland
Starr v. Starr, 1999 SLT 335 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 195]

IGR, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 208  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 1154]

Switzerland
5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

Zimbabwe
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ZW 340]

There are some examples where courts have placed emphasis on the financial circumstances (or accommodation arrangements) that a child / abductor would face, in deciding whether or not to make a return order:

Australia
Harris v. Harris [2010] FamCAFC 221 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 1119]

The financially precarious position in which the mother would find herself were a return order to be made was a relevant consideration in the making of a non-return order.

France
CA Paris, 13 avril 2012, No de RG 12/0617 [INCADAT Reference : HC/E/FR 1189]

In this case, inadequate housing was a relevant factor in the consideration of a non-return order.

Netherlands
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader /the father) against X (de moeder/ the mother) (7 February 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 314]

In this case, financial circumstances were a relevant factor in the consideration of a non-return order.

United Kingdom - Scotland
C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [INCADAT Reference : HC/E/UKs 998]

An example where financial circumstances did lead to a non-return order being made.

A, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 215, 2012 S.L.T. 370 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 1153]

In this case, adequate accommodation and financial support were relevant factors in the consideration of a non-return order.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy (Application No 14737/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1152]

The ECrtHR, in finding that there had been a breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in the return of a child from Latvia to Italy, noted that the Italian courts exercising their powers under the Brussels IIa Regulation, had overlooked the fact that it was not financially viable for the mother to return with the child: she spoke no Italian and was virtually unemployable.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Undertakings

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Faits

L'affaire concernait un enfant né en Italie en 2002 d'une mère lettone et d'un père italien. Les parents n'étaient pas mariés et se sont séparés en 2003. La mère a affirmé que le père avait joué un rôle minime dans l'éducation de l'enfant. Le 20 septembre 2004, le Youth Court (Tribunal de la jeunesse) de Rome a accordé la garde exclusive de l'enfant à la mère et un droit de visite au père. Le 3 février 2006, la Cour italienne a contraint le père à verser une pension alimentaire à la mère, une obligation à laquelle il ne s'est pas conformé. Le 8 avril 2006, la mère a déposé plainte auprès des services de police italiens.

L'unique source de revenus de la mère était l'argent que lui envoyait sa famille en Lettonie. Ces versements ont pris fin en décembre 2005, et la mère s'est retrouvée sans ressources en Italie. Elle est donc retournée en Lettonie avec son enfant en avril 2006. Le père a demandé la garde exclusive provisoire de l'enfant et son retour en Italie devant le Tribunal de la jeunesse de Rome. La Cour a accueilli la requête du père et a ordonné la tenue d'une audience le 25 octobre 2006. Bien que la Cour ne soit pas compétente pour ordonner le retour, elle a jugé que l'enfant devait résider avec son père. La mère a affirmé ne pas avoir été informée de la tenue de l'audience.

Le 16 janvier 2007, le père a entamé une procédure en vertu de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 relative à l'enlèvement d'enfants en vue d'obtenir le retour de l'enfant en Italie. L'Autorité centrale lettone a estimé que ce ne serait pas dans l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant, qui s'était intégré en Lettonie et dont les conditions de vie étaient propices à sa croissance et à son développement. En outre, la mère veillait à son développement physique et émotionnel.

Le 11 avril 2007, la Cour lettone a rejeté la demande de retour introduite par le père, estimant que l'exception prévue par l'article 13(1)(b) de la Convention de La Haye était établie. Des contraintes financières empêchaient la mère d'accompagner l'enfant en cas de retour en Italie, et les garanties proposées par le pays ne suffisaient pas à protéger l'enfant du traumatisme psychologique résultant du fait d'être séparé de sa mère. Par conséquent, les conditions prévues par l'article 11(4) du Règlement Bruxelles II bis (Règlement (CE) No 2201/2003 du Conseil du 27 novembre 2003) n'étaient pas remplies.

Le 7 août 2007, le père a demandé au Tribunal de la jeunesse de Rome de délivrer une ordonnance immédiatement exécutoire de retour de l'enfant en Italie en vertu de l'article 11 du Règlement Bruxelles II bis. La Cour s'est prononcée en sa faveur et a jugé que les garanties proposées par le père suffisaient à protéger l'enfant des risques auxquels il serait exposé à son retour. La décision a été maintenue en appel le 21 avril 2008.

Le 15 octobre 2008, la République de Lettonie a intenté une action contre l'Italie devant la Commission européenne en application de l'article 227 du Traité instituant la Communauté européenne. Elle a affirmé que le Tribunal de la jeunesse de Rome avait enfreint le Règlement Bruxelles II bis en ce qu'elle n'avait pas entendu la mère ni l'enfant au cours de la procédure et avait ignoré les décisions rendues par les tribunaux lettons.

La Commission a rejeté la demande. Rien n'indiquait que renvoyer l'enfant en Italie afin qu'il y vive avec son père l'exposerait à un risque physique ou psychique ou le placerait dans une situation intolérable. En outre, la Cour italienne avait imposé au père des mesures spécifiques destinées à protéger l'enfant de tout risque de danger et à permettre un contact avec les deux parents. Se fondant sur la jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (Dombo Beheer B.V. c. Pays-Bas (1994) 18 E.H.R.R. 213), la Commission a considéré que le recours à une procédure écrite était autorisé du moment que le principe d'égalité des armes était respecté.

La Commission a noté que la mère avait eu la possibilité de soumettre des observations écrites au même titre que le père et qu'il n'y avait donc pas eu de violation du Règlement Bruxelles II bis ni de la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux droits de l'enfant. Devant la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme, la mère et l'enfant se sont plaints en vertu de l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des droits de l'homme (CEDH) que les décisions rendues par les cours italiennes ordonnant le retour de l'enfant en Italie étaient contraires à son intérêt supérieur et constituaient une violation de la législation lettone et internationale. Tous deux ont également allégué une violation de l'article 6 en ce que le processus décisionnel des cours italiennes n'était pas équitable, critiquant notamment l'absence de la mère lors de l'audience devant le Tribunal de la jeunesse de Rome.

Dispositif

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a jugé, par six voix contre une, que l'ordonnance de retour des tribunaux italiens avait violé l'article 8 de la CEDH ; et a unanimement estimé que l'absence de la mère lors de l'audience organisée devant le Tribunal de la jeunesse de Rome n'avait pas violé l'article 8. Des dommages-intérêts ont été attribués à la mère et à l'enfant.

Commentaire INCADAT

Règlement Bruxelles II bis

76;2201/2203 (BRUXELLES II BIS)

L'application de la Convention de La Haye de 1980 dans les États membres de l'Union européenne (excepté le Danemark) a fait l'objet d'un amendement à la suite de l'entrée en vigueur du Règlement (CE) n°2201/2003 du Conseil du 27 novembre 2003 relatif à la compétence, la reconnaissance et l'exécution des décisions en matière matrimoniale et en matière de responsabilité parentale abrogeant le règlement (CE) n°1347/2000. Voir :

Affaire C-195/08 PPU Rinau v. Rinau, [2008] ECR I 5271 [2008] 2 FLR 1495 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 987];

Affaire C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1327].

La Convention de La Haye reste l'instrument majeur de lutte contre les enlèvements d'enfants, mais son application est précisée et complétée.

L'article 11(2) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis exige que dans le cadre de l'application des articles 12 et 13 de la Convention de La Haye, l'occasion doit être donnée à l'enfant d'être entendu pendant la procédure sauf lorsque cela s'avère inapproprié eu égard à son jeune âge ou son immaturité.

Cette obligation a donné lieu à un changement dans la jurisprudence anglaise :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Dans cette espèce le juge Hale indiqua que désormais les enfants seraient plus fréquemment auditionnés dans le cadre de l'application de la Convention de La Haye.

L'article 11(4) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis prévoit que : « Une juridiction ne peut pas refuser le retour de l'enfant en vertu de l'article 13, point b), de la convention de La Haye de 1980 s'il est établi que des dispositions adéquates ont été prises pour assurer la protection de l'enfant après son retour. »

Décisions ayant tiré les conséquences de l'article 11(4) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis pour ordonner le retour de l'enfant :

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

CA Paris 15 février 2007 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 979].

Il convient de noter que le Règlement introduit un nouveau mécanisme applicable lorsqu'une ordonnance de non-retour est rendue sur la base de l'article 13. Les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant ont la possibilité de rendre une décision contraignante sur la question de savoir si l'enfant doit retourner dans cet État nonobstant une ordonnance de non-retour. Si une telle décision de l'article 11(7) du Règlement est en effet rendue et certifiée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle, elle deviendra automatiquement exécutoire dans l'État de refuge ainsi que dans tous les États Membres.

Décision de retour de l'Article 11(7) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis rendue :

Re A. (Custody Decision after Maltese Non-return Order: Brussels II Revised) [2006] EWHC 3397 (Fam.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 883].

Décision de retour de l'Article 11(7) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis refusée :

Re A. H.A. v. M.B. (Brussels II Revised: Article 11(7) Application) [2007] EWHC 2016 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 289 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 930].

Voir le commentaire de :

P. McEleavy, « The New Child Abduction Regime in the European Community: Symbiotic Relationship or Forced Partnership? », Journal of Private International Law, 2005, p. 5 à 34.

Difficultés financières

L'article 13(1) b) et les difficultés financières

Dans de nombreux États contractants les juridictions ont adopté une approche stricte lorsqu'il a été soutenu que le parent demandeur (et par conséquent l'enfant) serait mis dans une situation financière difficile si une ordonnance de retour était rendue.

Australie
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 293]

Le fait que la mère ne pouvait accompagner l'enfant en Angleterre pour des raisons financières, ou autres, ne justifiait pas que les juges australiens se départissent de l'obligation claire qui pèse sur eux en application de la Convention.

Canada
Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 369]

La mère alléguait que les difficultés financières du père conduiraient à exposer les enfants à un risque grave de danger. La juge estima au contraire que l'existence de difficultés financières ne justifiait pas le refus de retour des enfants. Selon le juge : « les États signataires de la Convention ne cherchaient pas à protéger uniquement les enfants dont les parents sont aisés, en laissant à l'abandon les enfants de parents moins riches. Victimes d'enlèvement, ces enfants aussi doivent pouvoir faire l'objet d'une décision de retour ». [Traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Allemagne
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 821].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans des arrêts anciens, la cour d'appel a généralement rejeté les arguments selon lesquels les difficultés pécuniaires pourraient caractériser une situation intolérable au sens de l'article 13(1) b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 48].

Dépendre des allocations de l'État ne peut être en soi considéré comme une situation intolérable.

B. v. B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam. 32 (C.A.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 10].

Les difficultés financières et de logement n'empêchaient pas le prononcé d'une ordonnance de retour.

Dans Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 20], il a été suggéré qu'une exception pouvait être établie lorsque des jeunes enfants étaient susceptibles de se trouver sans foyer, soit qu'ils bénéficient des  prestations sociales versées par l'État soit qu'ils n'en bénéficient pas. La dépendance financière aux prestations sociales versées par l'État israélien ou l'État anglais ne saurait constituer une situation intolérable.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Starr v. Starr 1999 SLT 335, 1998 SCLR (Notes) 775 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 195];

Suisse
5A_285/2007 /frs, Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 955];

Zimbabwe
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZW 340].

Pour un exemple d'affaire dans laquelle une ordonnance de non retour a été rendue sur la basée de circonstances financières, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 998].

Ce fut également un facteur pertinent dans l'affaire suivante:

Pays-Bas
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader /the father) against X (de moeder/ the mother) (7 February 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 314].

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)

Engagements

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Hechos

El asunto trataba sobre un menor que nació en Italia en 2002, de madre letona y padre italiano. Estos nunca contrajeron matrimonio y se separaron en 2003. La madre afirmó que el padre apenas había contribuido a la crianza del menor. El 20 de septiembre de 2004, el Tribunal de Menores de Roma atribuyó la custodia exclusiva del menor a la madre y concedió un derecho de visita al padre. El 3 de febrero de 2006, el tribunal italiano impuso al padre la obligación de pago de alimentos. El padre incumplió esta obligación, por lo que, el 8 de abril de 2006, la madre presentó una denuncia ante la policía italiana.

La única fuente de ingresos con la que contaba la madre era el dinero que le enviaba su familia en Letonia. Estas sumas dejaron de llegar en 2005, por lo que la madre se encontró sin recursos para mantenerse en Italia. En consecuencia, regresó a Letonia con el menor en abril de 2006. El padre presentó demanda ante el Tribunal de Menores de Roma por la custodia exclusiva provisoria y la restitución a Italia. El tribunal estimó dicha demanda y fijó audiencia para el 25 de octubre de 2006. Si bien el tribunal no tenía competencia para resolver la restitución del menor, consideró que debía vivir con su padre. La madre afirmó que la audiencia no le fue notificada.

El 16 de enero de 2007, el padre inició un procedimiento en virtud del Convenio de La Haya de 1980 sobre sustracción de menores para que se resolviera la restitución de su hijo a Italia. La Autoridad Central letona declaró que el retorno no atendía al interés superior del menor, que ya se hallaba integrado en Letonia y cuyas condiciones de vida eran favorables para su crecimiento y desarrollo. Además, su madre se ocupaba de su desarrollo emocional y físico.

El 11 de abril de 2007, el juez letón rechazó la solicitud de restitución a Italia presentada por el padre y declaró configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) del Convenio de La Haya. La madre se veía impedida económicamente para acompañar al menor a Italia y además las medidas que ofrecía adoptar este país no eran adecuadas para garantizar la protección del menor respecto del daño psicológico derivado de separarse de su madre. Por lo tanto, las condiciones del artículo 11, apartado 4, del Reglamento Bruselas II bis (Reglamento (CE) N° 2201/2003 del Consejo, de 27 de noviembre de 2003) no se habían cumplido.

El 7 de agosto de 2007 el padre solicitó al Tribunal de Menores de Roma que emitiera una resolución de ejecución inmediata que ordenara la restitución del menor a Italia. El tribunal se pronunció en su favor y consideró que las medidas que ofrecía adoptar el padre eran adecuadas para garantizar la protección del menor tras su restitución. Dicha resolución fue confirmada en la instancia de apelación el 21 de abril de 2008.

La Comisión rechazó el recurso. No había ningún indicio de que la restitución con el padre expusiera al menor a un peligro físico o psíquico, o que de cualquier otra manera lo pusiera en a una situación intolerable. Asimismo, el tribunal italiano le había impuesto al padre obligaciones específicas a efectos de proteger al menor de todo riesgo y de posibilitar un contacto con ambos padres. Fundándose en la jurisprudencia del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, (1994) 18 E.H.R.R. 213), la Comisión consideró que recurrir a un procedimiento escrito estaba autorizado mientras se respetara el principio de igualdad de armas en el proceso.

La Comisión observó que se había acordado a la madre la posibilidad de presentar observaciones por escrito, al igual que al padre del menor, y que por ende, no había habido violación al Reglamento Bruselas II bis ni a la Convención de Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos del Nino. La madre y el menor presentaron un recurso ante el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos invocando el artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). Alegaron que las resoluciones de los tribunales italianos que ordenaban la restitución del menor a Italia no atendían al interés superior del menor y constituían una violación de Derecho internacional y del Derecho letón.

Asimismo, alegaron una violación al artículo 6 por considerar que el proceso decisorio de los tribunales italianos no había sido equitativo. Criticaron especialmente el hecho de que la madre no había estado presente durante la audiencia celebrada por el Tribunal de Menores de Roma.

Fallo

Por seis votos a favor y uno en contra, el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos estimó que la resolución de restitución del menor de los tribunales italianos había constituido una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Por unanimidad consideró, en cambio, que la ausencia de la madre en la audiencia celebrada por el Tribunal de Menores del Roma no había violado el artículo 8. Se otorgó indemnización por daños a la madre y al menor.

Comentario INCADAT

Reglamento Bruselas II bis

La aplicación del Convenio de la Haya de 1980 entre los Estados Miembro de la Unión Europea (excepto Dinamarca) ha sido reformada como consecuencia de la entrada en vigor del Reglamento del Consejo (CE) N° 2201/2003 de 27 de noviembre de 2003 relativo a la competencia  y el reconocimiento y la ejecución de sentencias en materia de matrimonio y responsabilidad parental,  que revocara el Reglamento (CE) N° 1347/2000, ver:

Case C-195/08 PPU Rinau v. Rinau, [2008] 2 FLR 1495 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ 987];

Case C 403/09 PPU Detiček v. Sgueglia, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1327].

El Convenio de la Haya continúa siendo la herramienta primaria para combatir las sustracciones de menores dentro de la Unión Europea pero su funcionamiento ha sido finamente ajustado.

El Artículo 11(2) del Reglamento Bruselas II bis exige que cuando se apliquen los Artículos 12 y 13 del Convenio de la Haya de 1980 se le otorgue al menor la oportunidad de ser oído durante el proceso, excepto que esto parezca inadecuado teniendo en cuenta su edad o grado de madurez.

Esta obligación ha llevado a un realineamiento de la práctica judicial en Inglaterra, ver:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880] donde la Baronesa Hale observó que la reforma llevaría a que se oyera a los menores con mayor frecuencia en los casos en virtud del Convenio de La Haya de la que había ocurrido hasta ese entonces.

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72,  [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones reafirmó la sugerencia de la Baronesa Hale de que el requerimiento establecido por el Reglamento de Bruselas II de averiguar la opinión de los niños de edad y madurez suficiente no estaba restringido a los casos de sustracción de niños de la Comunidad Europea, sino que era un principio de aplicación universal.  

El Artículo 11(3) del Reglamento de Bruselas II a requiere que los procedimientos se lleven a cabo dentro de las 6 semanas.

Klentzeris v. Klentzeris [2007] EWCA Civ 533, [2007] 2 FLR 996, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 931].

Thorpe LJ sostuvo que esto se extendía a las audiencias de apelación y en tal sentido recomendó que las solicitudes de apelación fueran realizadas directamente ante el juez de primera instancia y que se restringiera el período habitual de 21 días para correr el traslado de la apelación.  

El Artículo 11(4) del Reglamento Bruselas II bis dispone que no se puede denegar la restitución de un menor en virtud del Artículo 13(1) b) del Convenio de la Haya si se establece que se han realizado arreglos adecuados a fin de asegurar la protección del menor después de su restitución.

Entre los casos en los que se ha invocado el Artículo 11(4) del Reglamento Bruselas II bis para expedir una orden de restitución se encuentran los siguientes:

Francia

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947]

CA Paris 15 février 2007 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 979]

Se entendió que no existía protección relevante, lo que condujo a que se decidiera una orden de no restitución, en:

CA Aix-en-Provence, 30 novembre 2006, N° RG 06/03661 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 717].

El elemento más notorio del Artículo 11 es el nuevo mecanismo que se aplica actualmente cuando se expide una orden de no restitución sobre la base del Artículo 13. Esto permite a las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor resolver si el menor debería ser enviado de regreso a pesar de la orden de no restitución. Si se expide una orden de restitución posterior en virtud del Artículo 11(7) del Reglamento, y el juez que la expide la certifica, entonces será automáticamente ejecutable en el Estado de refugio y todos los demás Estados Miembro de la CE.

Artículo 11(7) del Reglamento Bruselas II bis - Orden de Restitución Otorgada:

Re A. (Custody Decision after Maltese Non-return Order: Brussels II Revised) [2006] EWHC 3397 (Fam.), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 883]

Artículo 11(7) del Reglamento Bruselas II bis - Orden de Restitución Denegada:

Re A. H.A. v. M.B. (Brussels II Revised: Article 11(7) Application) [2007] EWHC 2016 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 289, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 930]

Para comentarios académicos respecto del nuevo régimen de la UE, ver:

P. McEleavy ‘The New Child Abduction Regime in the European Community: Symbiotic Relationship or Forced Partnership?' [2005] Journal of Private International Law 5 - 34.

Factores económicos

Artículo 13(1)(b) y factores económicos

Existen muchos ejemplos, de una variedad de Estados contratantes, en los que los tribunales desestimaron la aplicación de la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) en casos en que se había aducido que el sustractor (y, por lo tanto, los menores) serían puestos en una situación económica difícil en el supuesto de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Australia
Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

El hecho de que la madre no pudiera acompañar al menor a Inglaterra por razones económicas o de otra naturaleza no justificaba el incumplimiento de la clara obligación que incumbe a los tribunales australianos en virtud del Convenio.

Canadá
Y.D. v. J.B., [1996] R.D.F. 753 (Que.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 369]

Una situación económica difícil no representaba una razón válida para rehusarse a restituir a un menor. El Tribunal declaró: "Los signatarios del Convenio no tuvieron presente solamente la protección de menores con padres adinerados, dejando expuestos y sin posibilidad de solicitar la restitución de un menor sustraído en forma ilícita a los padres sin recursos."

France
CA Lyon, 19 septembre 2011, No de RG 11/02919 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1168]

Las condiciones de vida más favorables en Francia no podían ser tenidas en consideración.

Alemania
7 UF 39/99, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 821]

Nueva Zelanda
K.M.A. v. Secretary for Justice [2007] NZFLR 891 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 1118]

No se probó la existencia de dificultades económicas. Además, el Tribunal de Apelaciones estimó que era muy poco probable que, de ser necesario, las autoridades australianas no proveyeran algún tipo de asistencia económica o jurídica.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En la jurisprudencia temprana, en reiteradas oportunidades, el Tribunal de Apelaciones rechazó alegaciones de que los factores económicos pudieran justificar el pronunciamiento de la existencia de una situación intolerable a efectos del artículo 13(1)(b).

Re A. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] Fam 106 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Uke 48]

En este caso, el tribunal resolvió que no puede afirmarse que la dependencia de prestaciones del Estado constituya una situación intolerable.

B. v. B. (Abduction: custody rights) [1993] Fam. 32, [1993] 2 All ER 144, [1993] 1 FLR 238, [1993] Fam Law 198 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 10]

Dificultades económicas o de vivienda no impidieron que se ordenara la restitución.

Re M. (Abduction: Undertakings) [1995] 1 FLR 1021 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 20]

El tribunal sugirió que la excepción podría establecerse si los niños pequeños fueran a quedar sin vivienda y sin acceso a prestaciones del Estado. No obstante, no podía afirmarse que depender de prestaciones del Estado israelí o del Estado inglés constituyera una situación intolerable.

Reino Unido - Escocia
Starr v. Starr 1999 SLT 335, 1998 SCLR (Notes) 775 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 195]

Suiza
5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

Zimbabue
Secretary For Justice v. Parker 1999 (2) ZLR 400 (H) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZW 340]

En algunos casos, los tribunales han adjudicado importancia a la situación económica (o de vivienda) que el niño o el sustractor enfrentarían para establecer si procede o no ordenar el retorno del menor:

Australia
Harris v. Harris [2010] FamCAFC 221 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1119]

La precaria situación económica en la que se encontraría la madre de ordenarse el retorno del menor fue un factor relevante en la denegación de la restitución.

Francia
CA Paris, 13 avril 2012, No de RG 12/0617 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1189]

En este caso, las dificultades con respecto a la vivienda tuvieron una gran incidencia en la decisión de si correspondía denegar el retorno del menor.

Países Bajos
De directie Preventie, optredend voor zichzelf en namens Y (de vader) tegen X (de moeder) (7 de febrero de 2001, ELRO nr.AA9851 Zaaknr:813-H-00) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 314]

En este caso, la situación económica constituyó un factor relevante para establecer si procedía denegar el retorno del menor.

Reino Unido - Escocia
C. v. C. 2003 S.L.T. 793 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 998]

Este caso constituye un ejemplo de cuando la situación económica justifica la denegación de la restitución.

A, Petitioner [2011] CSOH 215, 2012 S.L.T. 370 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 1153]

En este caso, disponer de una vivienda y recursos económicos adecuados fue un factor relevante para establecer si procedía denegar la restitución.

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Šneersone and Kampanella v. Italy (Application No 14737/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1152]

Con respecto al retorno de un menor de Letonia a Italia, el TEDH declaró la existencia de una vulneración al artículo 8 del Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH) y señaló que los tribunales italianos con competencia según el Reglamento Bruselas II bis no habían tenido en cuenta el hecho de que no era económicamente viable para la madre regresar con el menor ya que no hablaba italiano y prácticamente no podía conseguir trabajo.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Fallos del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)

Compromisos

Preparación del análisis de jurisprudencia de INCADAT en curso.