CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Ruling Nº393-05-F

INCADAT reference

HC/E/PA 872

Court

Country

PANAMA

Name

Juzgado Segundo de Niñez y Adolescencia de Panamá

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Lic. Delia Cedeño P

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

PANAMA

Decision

Date

5 July 2005

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

21

HC article(s) Relied Upon

21

Other provisions
Art. 9(3) of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
Authorities | Cases referred to

-

Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Safe Return / Mirror Orders

Access / Contact

Protection of Rights of Access
Protection of Rights of Access

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The application related to a mother's request for access. The child in question lived in the United Kingdom with the father. The mother and another sibling lived in Panama.

On 4 November 2004 the High Court in London made a contact order in favour of the mother. To ensure that the terms of the order were complied with, and the child returned at the end of the period of visitation, the High Court stipulated that the terms of the order were to be registered by the Panamanian authorities.

In pursuance of this objective the Central Authority for England and Wales filed an access petition under Article 21 with the Panamanian authorities.

Ruling

Access rights granted by a United Kingdom court were guaranteed by a mirror order issued in Panama.

INCADAT comment

Safe Return / Mirror Orders

A practice has arisen in a number of Contracting States for return orders to be made subject to compliance with certain specified requirements or undertakings. To ensure that such protective measures are enforceable, the applicant may be required to have these measures registered in identical or equivalent terms in the child's State of habitual residence. These replica orders are commonly referred to as ‘safe return' or ‘mirror orders'.

Return orders have been made subject to the enactment of safe return /mirror orders in the following jurisdictions:

Australia
Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWHC 1247, [2004] 2 FLR 499  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ UKe 599];

Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

A request by the English High Court for protective measures ancillary to an order for international contact to be registered in the State of visitation was upheld by the Panama Second Court of Childhood and Adolescence, see:

Ruling Nº393-05-F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/PA 872].

A request that a return order be made subject to the implementation of mirror orders was turned down in:

Israel 
Family Application 8743/07 Y.D.G. v T.G., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 983].

The Jerusalem Family Court ruled that since accusations against the father had not been upheld there was no basis to impose conditions to ensure the children's safety, other than deposit of money to secure the father's undertaking that they could live in his apartment. There was no need to obtain a mirror order from the US courts as the delay in so doing would harm the children.

Protection of Rights of Access

Article 21 has been subjected to varying interpretations.  Contracting States favouring a literal interpretation have ruled that the provision does not establish a basis of jurisdiction for courts to intervene in access matters and is focussed on procedural assistance from the relevant Central Authority.  Other Contracting States have allowed proceedings to be brought on the basis of Article 21 to give effect to existing access rights or even to create new access rights.

A literal interpretation of the provision has found favour in:

Austria
S. v. S., 25 May 1998, transcript (official translation), Regional civil court at Graz, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 245];

Germany
2 UF 286/97, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 488];

United States of America
Bromley v. Bromley, 30 F. Supp. 2d 857, 860-61 (E.D. Pa. 1998). [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 223];

Teijeiro Fernandez v. Yeager, 121 F. Supp. 2d 1118, 1125 (W.D. Mich. 2000);

Janzik v. Schand, 22 November 2000, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 463];

Wiggill v. Janicki, 262 F. Supp. 2d 687, 689 (S.D.W. Va. 2003);

Yi Ly v. Heu, 296 F. Supp. 2d 1009, 1011 (D. Minn. 2003);

In re Application of Adams ex. rel. Naik v. Naik, 363 F. Supp. 2d 1025, 1030 (N.D. Ill. 2005);

Wiezel v. Wiezel-Tyrnauer, 388 F. Supp. 2d 206 (S.D.N.Y. 2005), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 828];

Cantor v. Cohen, 442 F.3d 196 (4th Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 827]. 

In Cantor, the only US appellate decision on Article 21, there was a dissenting judgment which found that the US implementing act did provide a jurisdictional basis for federal courts to hear an application with regard to an existing access right.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re G. (A Minor) (Enforcement of Access Abroad) [1993] Fam 216 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 110].

More recently however the English Court of Appeal has suggested that it might be prepared to consider a more permissive interpretation:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

Baroness Hale has recommended the elaboration of a procedure whereby the facilitation of rights of access in the United Kingdom under Article 21 could be contemplated at the same time as the return of the child under Article 12:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Switzerland
Arrondissement judiciaire I Courterlary-Moutier-La Neuveville (Suisse) 11 October 1999, N° C 99 4313 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 454].                        

A more permissive interpretation of Article 21 has indeed been adopted elsewhere, see:

United Kingdom - Scotland
Donofrio v. Burrell, 2000 S.L.T. 1051 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 349].

Wider still is the interpretation adopted in New Zealand, see:

Gumbrell v. Jones [2001] NZFLR 593 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 446].

Australia
The position in Australia has evolved in the light of statutory reforms.

Initially a State Central Authority could only apply for an order that was ‘necessary or appropriate to organise or secure the effective exercise of rights of access to a child in Australia', see:

Director-General, Department of Families Youth & Community Care v. Reissner [1999] FamCA 1238, (1999) 25 Fam LR 330, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 278].

Subsequently it acquired the power to initiate proceedings to establish access rights:

State Central Authority & Peddar [2008] FamCA 519, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1107];

State Central Authority & Quang [2009] FamCA 1038, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1106].

Faits

L'affaire concernait une demande de droit de visite introduite par une mère. L'enfant en cause vivait au Royaume-Uni avec le père. La mère et un autre enfant vivaient au Panama.

Le 4 novembre 2004 la High Court de Londres rendit une décision accordant un droit de visite à la mère. Afin de s'assurer que les termes de cette décision seraient respectés et l'enfant renvoyé au Royaume-Uni à l'issue des périodes de contact, la High Court avait ordonné que les termes de la décision devraient être enregistrés par les autorités panaméennes.

Pour ce faire, l'Autorité centrale anglaise introduisit une demande en application de l'article 21 de la Convention au Panama.

Dispositif

Les termes du droit de visite accordé au Royaume-Uni firent l'objet d'une décision miroir au Panama.

Commentaire INCADAT

Assurer un retour sans danger / Ordonnances miroir

Une pratique s'est fait jour dans un certain nombre d'États contractants dans lesquels l'ordonnance de retour est prononcée sous réserve du respect de certaines exigences ou de certains engagements. Afin de s'assurer que ces mesures de protection sont susceptibles d'être exécutées, il peut être exigé du demandeur qu'il fasse enregistrer ces mesures en des termes identiques ou équivalents auprès des autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant. Ces décisions sont généralement décrites comme des ordonnances « assurant le retour sans danger de l'enfant » ou « ordonnances miroir ».

Des ordonnances de retour ont été rendues par les juridictions suivantes sous réserve du prononcé d'une ordonnance assurant le retour sans danger de l'enfant ou d'une ordonnance miroir :

Australie
Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWHC 1247, [2004] 2 FLR 499 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ UKe 599] ;

Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982] ;

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309] ;

Central Authority v. Houwert [2007] SCA 88 (RSA); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 900].

Une demande déposée par la High Court anglaise concernant des mesures de protection prises dans le cadre d'une décision relative aux termes d'un droit de visite international et enregistrées dans l'État où les périodes de visite devaient se dérouler a été reprise et prolongée au Panama dans la décision :

Ruling Nº393-05-F [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/PA 872].

Une demande sollicitant le retour d'un enfant sous réserve qu'une ordonnance miroir soit rendue dans l'État d'origine fut rejetée par les juridictions israéliennes dans Family Application  8743/07 Y.D.G. v. T.G., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 983], les accusations formulées à l'encontre du père ayant été déclarées sans fondement.

Protection du droit de visite

L'article 21 a fait l'objet d'interprétations divergentes. Les États contractants qui privilégient une interprétation littérale considèrent que cette disposition ne crée pas de compétence judiciaire en matière de droit de visite mais se limite à organiser une assistance procédurale de la part des Autorités centrales. D'autres États contractants autorisent l'introduction de procédures judiciaires sur le fondement de l'article 21 en vue de donner effet à un droit de visite préalablement reconnu voire de reconnaître un nouveau droit de visite.

États préférant une interprétation littérale de l'article 21 :

Autriche
S. v. S., 25 May 1998, transcript (official translation), Regional civil court at Graz, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 245].

Allemagne
2 UF 286/97, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 488].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Bromley v. Bromley, 30 F. Supp. 2d 857, 860-61 (E.D. Pa. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 223] ;

Teijeiro Fernandez v. Yeager, 121 F. Supp. 2d 1118, 1125 (W.D. Mich. 2000) ;

Janzik v. Schand, 22 November 2000, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 463] ;

Wiggill v. Janicki, 262 F. Supp. 2d 687, 689 (S.D.W. Va. 2003) ;

Yi Ly v. Heu, 296 F. Supp. 2d 1009, 1011 (D. Minn. 2003) ;

In re Application of Adams ex. rel. Naik v. Naik, 363 F. Supp. 2d 1025, 1030 (N.D. Ill. 2005) ;

Wiezel v. Wiezel-Tyrnauer, 388 F. Supp. 2d 206 (S.D.N.Y. 2005), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @828@] ;

Cantor v. Cohen, 442 F.3d 196 (4th Cir. 2006), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/USf @827@].

Cette décision est la seule rendue par une juridiction d'appel aux États-Unis d'Amérique concernant l'article 21, mais avec une opinion dissidente selon laquelle la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention en droit américain donne compétence aux juridictions fédérales pour connaître d'une demande concernant l'exercice d'un droit de visite préexistant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
In Re G. (A Minor) (Enforcement of Access Abroad) [1993] Fam 216 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 110]

Plus récemment, la Cour d'appel anglaise a suggéré dans Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 809], qu'elle n'était pas imperméable à l'idée de privilégier une interprétation plus large similaire à celle suivie dans d'autres États :

Quoique le juge Hale ait recommandé l'élaboration d'une procédure qui permettrait de faciliter le droit de visite au Royaume-Uni en application de l'article 21 en même temps que d'organiser le retour de l'enfant en application de l'article 12 :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Suisse
Arrondissement judiciaire I Courterlary-Moutier-La Neuveville (Suisse) 11 Octobre 1999 , N° C 99 4313 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 454].

Une interprétation plus permissive de l'article 21 a été adoptée dans d'autres États :

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Donofrio v. Burrell, 2000 S.L.T. 1051 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 349].

Une interprétation encore plus large est privilégiée en Nouvelle-Zélande :

Gumbrell v. Jones [2001] NZFLR 593 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 446].

Australie
Director-General, Department of Families Youth & Community Care v. Reissner [1999] FamCA 1238, (1999) 25 Fam LR 330 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 278].

Hechos

El pedido se relacionaba con la petición de visitas de una madre. El niño en cuestión vivía en el Reino Unido con su padre. La madre y su mellizo vivían en Panamá.

El 4 de noviembre de 2004 el Tribunal de Londres dictó una orden de contacto a favor de la madre. A fin de garantizar que los términos de la orden fueran cumplidos, y el niño fuera restituido una vez cumplido el período vacacional, el Tribunal dispuso que los términos de la orden debían ser registrados por las autoridades panameñas.

Para cumplir este objetivo la Autoridad Central de Inglaterra y Gales presentó un pedido de visitas en los términos del artículo 21 ante las Autoridades panameñas.

Fallo

Los derechos de visita otorgados por el Tribunal del Reino Unido fueron garantizados a través de una orden espejo emitida en Panamá.

Comentario INCADAT

Restitución segura / órdenes espejo

En un número de Estados contratantes ha surgido una práctica para que las órdenes de restitución estén sujetas al cumplimiento de determinados requisitos o compromisos específicos. A fin de asegurar que tales medidas de protección sean ejecutables, se le puede exigir al solicitante que registre estas medidas en términos idénticos o equivalentes en el Estado de residencia habitual del menor. Por lo general se hace referencia a estas órdenes replicadas como de "restitución segura" u "órdenes espejo".

En las siguientes jurisdicciones, las órdenes de restitución se han sometido al dictado de una orden de restitución segura u órdenes espejo:

Australia
Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWHC 1247, [2004] 2 FLR 499  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ UKe 599];

Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 982];

Sudáfrica
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 309];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

El Juzgado Segundo de Niñez y Adolescencia de Panamá hizo lugar a una solicitud por parte del High Court inglés de medidas de protección accesorias a una orden sobre un derecho de visita internacional que debían ser registradas en el Estado en el que tendría lugar la visita. Véase:

Ruling Nº393-05-F, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/PA 872].

Una solicitud de que una orden de restitución quedara sujeta a la implementación de órdenes espejo fue rechazada en

Israel
Family Application  8743/07 Y.D.G. v T.G., [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 983].

El Tribunal de Familia de Jerusalén decidió que dado que las acusaciones contra el padre no habían sido confirmadas, no había fundamentos para imponer condiciones para el regreso seguro del niño, más que ordenar que el padre deposite una suma de dinero de modo de garantizar su compromiso de permitirles vivir en su apartamento. No había necesidad de obtener una orden espejo de los tribunales de Estados Unidos, ya que la demora que ello produciría generaría un daño a los niños.

Protección de los Derechos de Visita

Artículo 21 ha sido objeto de diversas interpretaciones. Los Estados Contratantes que favorecen una interpretación literal han concluido que la disposición no brinda un fundamento jurisdiccional según el cual los tribunales pueden intervenir en cuestiones de derecho de visita sino que se concentra en la asistencia procesal por parte de la Autoridad Central pertinente. Otros Estados Contratantes han permitido que se instituyan procesos sobre la base del Artículo 21 a fin de hacer efectivos los derechos de visita existentes o incluso crear nuevos derechos de visita.

En los siguientes casos, se dió una interpretación literal a la disposición:

Austria
S. v. S., 25 May 1998, transcript (official translation), Regional civil court at Graz, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 245];

Alemania
2 UF 286/97, Oberlandesgericht Bamberg, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 488];

Estados Unidos de América
Bromley v. Bromley, 30 F. Supp. 2d 857, 860-61 (E.D. Pa. 1998). [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 223];

Teijeiro Fernandez v. Yeager, 121 F. Supp. 2d 1118, 1125 (W.D. Mich. 2000);

Janzik v. Schand, 22 November 2000, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 463];

Wiggill v. Janicki, 262 F. Supp. 2d 687, 689 (S.D.W. Va. 2003);

Yi Ly v. Heu, 296 F. Supp. 2d 1009, 1011 (D. Minn. 2003);

In re Application of Adams ex. rel. Naik v. Naik, 363 F. Supp. 2d 1025, 1030 (N.D. Ill. 2005);

Wiezel v. Wiezel-Tyrnauer, 388 F. Supp. 2d 206 (S.D.N.Y. 2005), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 828];

Cantor v. Cohen, 442 F.3d 196 (4th Cir. 2006), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 827]. 

En Cantor, la única decisión de un tribunal de apelaciones de los Estados Unidos respecto del Artículo 21, se dictó un fallo en disidencia que determinó que el acto de implementación de los Estados Unidos sí brindaba un fundamento jurisdiccional para que los tribunales federales se pronunciaran sobre una solicitud relativa a un derecho de visita existente.  

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
In Re G. (A Minor) (Enforcement of Access Abroad) [1993] Fam 216 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 110]

Más recientemente, sin embargo, el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Inglaterra sugirió que posiblemente esté preparado para considerar una interpretación más permisiva:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 809].

La Baronesa Hale ha recomendado la elaboración de un proceso mediante el cual pueda contemplarse la facilitación de los derechos de visita en el Reino Unido en virtud del Artículo 21 al mismo tiempo que la restitución del menor de acuerdo con el Artículo 12:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880].

Suiza
Arrondissement judiciaire I Courterlary-Moutier-La Neuveville (Suisse) 11 October 1999, N° C 99 4313 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 454].

En efecto, en otros lugares se adoptó una interpretación más permisiva del Artículo 21, ver:

Reino Unido - Escocia
Donofrio v. Burrell, 2000 S.L.T. 1051 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 349].

Aún más amplia es la interpretación adoptada en Nueva Zelanda, ver:

Gumbrell v. Jones [2001] NZFLR 593 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 446].

Australia
Director-General, Department of Families Youth & Community Care v. Reissner [1999] FamCA 1238, (1999) 25 Fam LR 330 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 278].