CASE

No full text available

Case Name

In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E.2d 662 (1994)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USs 138

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - STATE JURISDICTION

Name

Court of Appeals of Ohio, Eleventh Appellate District, Portage County

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Ford P.J., Christley & Nader JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

AUSTRALIA

Requested State

UNITED STATES - STATE JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

6 March 1994

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Appeal dismissed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(b) 12(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(b) 12(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Tahan v. Duquette, 259 N.J. Super. 328, 613 A.2d 486 (App. Div. 1992)

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Limited Nature of the Exceptions
Settlement of the child
Settlement of the Child
Concealment
Equitable Tolling
Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a boy, was 2 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. In 1991 he was taken from his home in Australia by his father.

On 20 April 1994 the Juvenile Division of the Portage County Court of Common Pleas ordered the return of the boy.

The father appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return ordered; the standard required under Articles 13(1)(b) and 12(2) had not been met.

INCADAT comment

Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Settlement of the Child

A uniform interpretation has not emerged with regard to the concept of settlement; in particular whether it should be construed literally or rather in accordance with the policy objectives of the Convention.  In jurisdictions favouring the latter approach the burden of proof on the abducting parent is clearly greater and the exception is more difficult to establish.

Jurisdictions in which a heavy burden of proof has been attached to the establishment of settlement include:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 106]

In this case it was held that settlement is more than mere adjustment to surroundings. It involves a physical element of relating to, being established in, a community and an environment. It also has an emotional constituent denoting security and stability.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598]

For academic criticism of Re N. see:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2006, paragraph 19-121.

However, it may be noted that a more recent development in England has been the adoption of a child-centric assessment of settlement by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  This ruling may impact on the previous case law.

However there was no apparent weakening of the standard in the non-Convention case Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649,[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107]

For Article 12(2) to be activated the interest of the child in not being uprooted must be so cogent that it outweighs the primary purpose of the Convention, namely the return of the child to the proper jurisdiction so that the child's future may be determined in the appropriate place.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

A settled situation was one which could reasonably be relied upon to last as matters stood and did not contain indications that it was likely to change radically or to fall apart. There had therefore to be some projection into the future.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]

United States of America
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf  134]

A literal interpretation of the concept of settlement has been favoured in:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

The impact of the divergent interpretations is arguably most marked where very young children are concerned.

It has been held that settlement is to be considered from the perspective of a young child in:

Austria
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 938];

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/MC 510];

Switzerland
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 431].

A child-centric approach has also been adopted in several significant appellate decisions with regard to older children, with emphasis placed on the children's views.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

In contrast, a more objective assessment was favoured in the United States decision:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 208]
The children, aged 3 and 1 1/2, had not established significant ties to their community in Brooklyn; they were not involved in school, extra-curricular, community, religious or social activities which children of an older age would be.

Concealment

Where children are concealed in the State of refuge courts are reluctant to make a finding of settlement, even if many years elapse before their discovery:

Canada (7 years elapsed)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

See however the decision of the Cour d'appel de Montréal in:

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

United Kingdom - Scotland (2 ½ years elapsed)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

Switzerland (4 years elapsed)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne (Magistrates' Court), decision of 6 July 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 434];

United States of America
(2 ½ years elapsed)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 125];

(3 years elapsed)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 138].

Non-return orders have been made where notwithstanding the concealment the children have still been able to lead open lives:

United Kingdom - England & Wales (4 years elapsed)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 815];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region) (4 ¾ years elapsed)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

Equitable Tolling

In accordance with this principle the one year time limit in Article 12 is only deemed to commence from the date of the discovery of the children. The rationale being that otherwise an abducting parent who concealed children for more than a year would be rewarded for their misconduct by creating eligibility for an affirmative defence which was not otherwise available.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578].

The principle of 'equitable tolling' in the context of the time limit specified in Article 12 has been rejected in other jurisdictions, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 598];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 825];

New Zealand
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 1127].

Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

Unlike the Article 13 exceptions, Article 12(2) does not expressly afford courts a discretion to make a return order if settlement is established.  Where this issue has arisen for consideration the majority judicial view has nevertheless been to apply the provision as if a discretion does exist, but this has arisen in different ways.

Australia
The matter has not been conclusively decided but there would appear to be appellate support for inferring a discretion, reference has been made to English and Scottish case law, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 276].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
English case law initially favoured inferring that a Convention based discretion existed by virtue of Article 18, see:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598].

However, this interpretation was expressly rejected in the House of Lords decision Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  A majority of the panel held that the construction of Article 12(2) left the matter open that there was an inherent discretion where settlement was established.  It was pointed out that Article 18 did not confer any new power to order the return of a child under the Convention, rather it contemplated powers conferred by domestic law.

Ireland
In accepting the existence of a discretion reference was made to early English authority and Article 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 391].

New Zealand
A discretion derives from the domestic legislation implementing the Convention, see:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 882].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Whilst the matter was not explored in any detail, settlement not being established, there was a suggestion that a discretion would exist, with reference being made to Article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107].

There have been a few decisions in which no discretion was found to attach to Article 12(2), these include:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232], - subsequently questioned;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 596] - subsequently overruled;

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

Article 18 not being included in the act implementing the Convention in Quebec, it is understood that courts do not possess a discretionary power where settlement is established.

For academic commentary on the use of discretion where settlement is established, see:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 204 et seq.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de 2 ans à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. En 1991, son père l'emmena d'Australie où il résidait.

Le 20 avril 1994, le juge de première instance (Juvenile Division of the Portage County Court of Common Pleas) ordonna le retour de l'enfant.

Le père interjeta appel.

Dispositif

L'appel a été rejeté et le retour ordonné ; les conditions posées par les articles 13 alinéa 1 b et 12 alinéa 2 n'étaient pas remplies.

Commentaire INCADAT

Nature limitée des exceptions

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Intégration de l'enfant

La notion d'intégration ne fait pas encore l'objet d'une interprétation uniforme. La question se pose notamment de savoir si l'intégration doit s'entendre littéralement ou être interprétée à la lumière des objectifs de la Convention. Dans les États faisant prévaloir la deuxième alternative, la charge de la preuve est plus lourde pour le parent ravisseur et l'exception d'application plus rare.

Parmi les États les plus exigeants en ce qui concerne la preuve de l'intégration de l'enfant, on peut citer :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] ;
Dans cette espèce, il fut décidé que la notion d'intégration dépassait celle d'adaptation au nouveau milieu. L'intégration implique un élément de relation physique avec une communauté et un environnement. Elle contient un élément émotionnel traduisant la sécurité et la stabilité.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Pour un commentaire critique de Re N., voir :

L.Collins et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws: fourteenth edition, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2006, para. 19 à 121.

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment l'Angleterre a vu se développer une analyse de la notion d'intégration centrée sur l'enfant. On se réfèrera à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. Cette décision pourrait remettre en cause la jurisprudence antérieure.

Toutefois cette décision n'a apparemment pas affaibli les exigences posées en la matière par la Common Law comme en témoigne Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Pour que l'article 12(2) trouve à s'appliquer, il faut que l'intérêt qu'a l'enfant à rester dans son nouveau milieu soit si fort qu'il dépasse l'objectif premier de la Convention selon lequel il appartient au juge du lieu de la résidence habituelle qu'avait l'enfant au moment de l'enlèvement de décider de l'avenir de celui-ci.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963]

L'intégration existe dans les situations stables, dont on peut s'attendre qu'elles durent. Il convient d'opérer une certaine projection dans l'avenir.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962]

États-Unis d'Amérique
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf  134]

Une interprétation littérale du concept d'intégration a été préférée dans les États suivants :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291];

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825]

L'impact de la différence d'interprétation est sans doute plus marqué lorsque ce sont des jeunes enfants qui sont en cause.

Il a été décidé que l'intégration doit s'apprécier du point de vue du jeune enfant en :

Autriche
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 378] ;

Australie
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 823] ;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824] ;

Israël
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938] ;

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/MC 510] ;

Suisse
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (Cour cantonale de St. Gallen) (Suisse), décision du 8 Septembre 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 431].

Une approche centrée sur l'enfant a également été adoptée dans des décisions importantes rendues à propos d'enfants plus grands, l'accent étant mis sur l'opinion de l'enfant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

En revanche, c'est une analyse plus objective de l'intégration qui a été préférée aux États-Unis d'Amérique :

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S. 2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 208];
Les enfants, âgés de 3 ans et 1 an ½ n'avaient pas établi de liens importants dans leur nouveau milieu de Brooklyn. Ils ne participaient pas aux activités scolaires, extrascolaires, religieuses, sociales ou communautaires auxquelles des enfants plus âgés se livrent.

Dissimulation de l'enfant

Lorsque des enfants sont cachés dans l'État de refuge, les juges sont réticents à l'idée de considérer qu'il y a eu intégration, même lorsque de nombreuses années se sont écoulées entre le déplacement et la localisation :

Canada (7 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/CA 754] ;

Voir cependant la décision de la Cour d'appel de Montréal dans :

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse (2 ans et demi entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962];

Suisse (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne, 6 juillet 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 434];

États-Unis d'Amérique
(2 ans et demi  entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125] ;

(3 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 138]. 

Dans certains États, le retour d'enfants a été ordonné alors même qu'ils menaient une vie relativement ouverte en dépit du fait qu'ils étaient recherchés :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 815] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong) (4 ans 3/4 entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825].

Principe de la suspension équitable du délai de prescription (« equitable tolling »)

L'utilisation de ce principe impose que le calcul du délai d'un an contenu à l'article 12 ne commence qu'à partir du moment où l'enfant a pu être localisé. Un parent ravisseur qui a caché l'enfant pendant plus d'un an pourrait sinon bénéficier d'une exception (qui devrait lui être fermée en principe), et ce, pour la seule raison qu'il s'est comporté de manière inacceptable.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

Le principe de la suspension équitable du délai de prescription (« equitable tolling ») a été rejeté dans le contexte de l'application de l'article 12(2) par certains États :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1127].

Pouvoir d'ordonner le retour nonobstant l'intégration

Au contraire de l'exception de l'article 13, l'article 12(2) ne prévoit pas expressément la possibilité pour les juridictions saisies de la demande de retour de disposer d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour ordonner le retour en cas d'intégration. Lorsque la question s'est posée, il apparaît néanmoins que les cours ont majoritairement  admis le caractère discrétionnaire de l'application de cette disposition.  La question s'est toutefois posée en des termes très variables :

Australie
La question n'a pas été définitivement résolue mais il semble que la Cour d'appel a sous-entendu le caractère discrétionnaire de l'article 12(2), référence faite à la jurisprudence anglaise et écossaise. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 276].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La jurisprudence anglaise déduisait l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire de l'article 18, voir :

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Toutefois cette interprétation a été expressément rejetée par la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. La majorité des juges estima que l'article 12(2) laissait ouverte la question de savoir si le retour pouvait discrétionnairement être ordonné nonobstant l'intégration. Les juges soulignèrent que l'article 18 ne donne pas un nouveau pouvoir d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant mais se réfère simplement à un pouvoir préexistant en droit interne.

Irlande
Il a été fait référence à la jurisprudence ancienne anglaise et à l'article 18 pour justifier l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire :

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 391];

Nouvelle-Zélande
En Nouvelle-Zélande, le pouvoir discrétionnaire est prévu par la législation de mise en œuvre de la Convention. Voir :

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J.) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Quoique la question n'ait pas été envisagée en détail puisqu'en l'espèce il n'y avait pas eu intégration, il fut suggéré que l'application de l'exception avait un caractère discrétionnaire, référence étant faite à l'article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Parmi les décisions qui n'ont pas usé de pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12(2), voir :

Australie
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232], - ultérieurement discuté;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, (Fam), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 596] - ultérieurement remis en cause;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

L'article 18 n'ayant pas été reproduit dans la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention au Québec, il a été considéré que le juge ne dispose pas d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en cas d'intégration.

Sur l'usage d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsque l'enfant enlevé s'est intégré dans son nouveau milieu, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 204 et seq.

R. Schuz, « In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Art 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention » Child and Family Law Quarterly, 2008.

Hechos

El menor tenía dos años en la fecha del supuesto traslado ilícito. En 1991, su padre se lo llevó de su hogar en Australia.

El 20 de abril de 1994, la Juvenile Division of the Portage County Court of Common Pleas (División de Menores del Tribunal de Acciones Civiles del Condado de Portage) ordenó la restitución del menor.

El padre apeló.

Fallo

Apelación desestimada y restitución ordenada; no se habían establecido las excepciones en la medida exigida en virtud de los artículos 13, apartado 1, letra (b) y 12, apartado 2.

Comentario INCADAT

Carácter limitado de las excepciones

En curso de elaboración.

Integración del niño

No ha surgido interpretación uniforme alguna relativa al concepto de integración; en particular si debería interpretarse literalmente o, en cambio, de conformidad con los objetivos del Convenio. En las jurisdicciones que favorecen el último enfoque, la carga de la prueba que incumbe al sustractor es claramente mayor y es más difícil establecer la configuración de la excepción.

Entre las jurisdicciones en las cuales se le ha atribuido una carga de la prueba importante al establecimiento de la integración se encuentran las siguientes:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 106].

En este caso se sostuvo que la integración es mucho más que la mera adaptación al entorno. Implica un elemento físico de estar relacionado con una comunidad y un entorno y de estar establecido en ellos. También tiene un componente emocional que denota seguridad y estabilidad.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598].

Para la crítica académica de Re N., ver:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, Londres, 2006, párrafos 19-121.

Sin embargo, se puede observar que un avance más reciente en Inglaterra ha sido la adopción por parte de la Cámara de los Lores de una evaluación de la integración centrada en el menor en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]. Este fallo puede afectar la jurisprudencia anterior.

No obstante ello, no hubo ningún debilitamiento aparente de este criterio en el caso no regulado por el Convenio Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 982].

Reino Unido - Escocia
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 107]

Para que se active el artículo 12(2), el interés en que el menor no sea desarraigado debe ser tan convincente de manera de que tenga más peso que el objeto primario del Convenio, a saber, la restitución del menor a la jurisdicción adecuada para que su futuro sea determinado en el lugar adecuado.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 963]

Una situación de integración es una situación en cuya permanencia puede confiarse de manera razonable en las circunstancias del caso y sobre la que no existen indicaciones de cambio radical o derrumbe. Por lo tanto, tiene que existir alguna proyección hacia el futuro.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]

Estados Unidos de América
Re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf  134].

Se favoreció una interpretación literal del concepto de integración en:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 291]

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825].

El impacto de las interpretaciones divergentes es discutiblemente más marcado cuando se encuentran afectados menores muy pequeños.

Se ha sostenido que se debe considerar la integración desde la perspectiva de un menor pequeño en:

Austria
7Ob573/90, Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IL 938];

Mónaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général c. M. H. K., [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/MC 510];

Suiza
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 431].

También se ha adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor en varias decisiones significativas adoptadas en instancia de apelación con respecto a menores de mayor edad, con el énfasis puesto en las opiniones del menor.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937];

Francia
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 814];

Canadá (Quebec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

En contraste, en la decisión de los Estados Unidos se favoreció una evaluación más objetiva:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USs 208].

Los menores, de tres y un año y medio de edad, no habían establecido lazos significativos con su comunidad en Brooklyn; no estaban involucrados en actividades escolares, extracurriculares, comunitarias, religiosas ni sociales en las que se verían involucrados menores de mayor edad.

Ocultamiento

Cuando se oculta a los menores en el Estado de refugio, los tribunales son renuentes a resolver en el sentido de la existencia de integración, incluso si transcurren muchos años antes de su descubrimiento:

Canadá (transcurridos 7 años)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754].

Ver, sin embargo, la decisión de la Cour d'appel de Montreal en:

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 de diciembre de 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

Reino Unido - Escocia (transcurridos 2 ½ años)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962];

Suiza (transcurridos 4 años)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne, (Magistrates' Court) (Switzerland), decision of 6 July 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 434];

Estados Unidos de América
(trascurridos 2 años y medio)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USf 125];

(trascurridos 3 años)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/USs 138].

Se han expedido órdenes de no restitución cuando, a pesar del ocultamiento, los menores, sin embargo, han podido llevar una vida abierta:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales (trascurridos 4 años)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 815];

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong) (trascurridos 4 ¾ años)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825].

Suspensión equitativa del plazo de prescripción (equitable tolling)

De conformidad con este principio, se considera que el plazo de un año previsto en el artículo 12 solo comienza a partir de la fecha en la que se localizó al menor. El fundamento lógico es que, en caso contrario, un progenitor sustractor que ocultó al menor por más de un año saldría recompensado por su conducta indebida con la posibilidad de oponer una excepción que, de otro modo, no podría oponer.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 578].

El principio de la suspensión equitativa del plazo de prescripción (equitable tolling) ha sido rechazado en otros Estados en el contexto de la aplicación del artículo 12. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598];

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825];

Nueva Zelanda
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 1127].

Facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución cuando el menor se encuentra integrado al nuevo ambiente

A diferencia de las excepciones del artículo 13, el artículo 12(2) no otorga expresamente a los tribunales la facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución si se comprueba su integración. Cuando ha surgido este tema para su consideración, la opinión de la mayoría judicial ha sido, sin embargo, aplicar la disposición como si existiera facultad discrecional, pero esto ha surgido de diferentes maneras.

Australia
La cuestión no se ha decidido de manera concluyente pero parecería haber respaldo, en la apelación, para inferir una facultad discrecional. Se ha hecho referencia a la jurisprudencia de Inglaterra y Escocia, ver:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 276].

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
La jurisprudencia inglesa inicialmente favoreció el inferir que existía una facultad discrecional basada en el Convenio en virtud del artículo 18, ver:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598].

Sin embargo, esta interpretación fue rechazada expresamente en la decisión de la Cámara de los Lores Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]. Una mayoría de la sala sostuvo que la interpretación del artículo 12(2) dejaba abierta la cuestión de que existía una facultad discrecional inherente cuando se establece la integración. Se señaló que el artículo 18 no confería ninguna facultad nueva para ordenar la restitución de un menor en virtud del Convenio, sino que contemplaba facultades conferidas por el derecho interno.

Irlanda
Al aceptar la existencia de una facultad discrecional, se hizo referencia a la temprana doctrina inglesa y al artículo 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IE 391].

Nueva Zelanda
Toda facultad discrecional deriva de la legislación interna que implementa el Convenio, ver:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 882].

Reino Unido - Escocia
Aunque no se exploró la cuestión en detalle, si no se establecía la integración, había un indicio de que existiría facultad discrecional, haciéndose referencia al artículo 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 107].

Ha habido algunas decisiones en las cuales se concluyó que no había facultad discrecional alguna atribuida al artículo 12(2), entre ellas:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232], - posteriormente cuestionada;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 824];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 596] - posteriormente revocada;

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825];

Canadá (Quebec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-97, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

Puesto que el artículo 18 no se encuentra incluido en la ley de implementación del Convenio en Quebec, se entiende que los tribunales no poseen facultad discrecional alguna cuando se ha establecido la integración del niño.

Para comentarios académicos sobre el uso de la facultad discrecional cuando se ha establecido la integración, ver:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999, en pág. 204 y ss.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.