CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKe 815

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

High Court, Family Division

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Kirkwood J.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Decision

Date

11 March 2004

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Return refused

HC article(s) Considered

12(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

12(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245 (Fam); Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA Civ 1330, (CA).
Published in

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection
Settlement of the child
Settlement of the Child
Concealment
Equitable Tolling
Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a 10 year old girl who had been born to an American father and an Irish mother. The family home was in California and the child lived there until December 1998 whereupon the mother retained the child in Ireland after an agreed vacation.

The father instituted Hague Convention proceedings. An agreement was made by the parents in July 1999 for the child to return. This happened but the mother then removed the child a very short time later. The child was not located until the autumn of 2003, when she was discovered living under an assumed identity in Liverpool, England.

On 15 October the child was placed into local authority care pending the commencement of return proceedings. She was reunited with her mother on 31 October, but this was made subject to a variety of conditions, including the mother wearing an electronic tagging device.

On 12 December the High Court delivered an interim order which considered the power of a court under English law in Convention proceedings to direct a local authority to make such arrangements as were necessary for a child to be placed with an appropriate person, institution or other body where such a course was necessary "for the purpose of securing the welfare of the child concerned or of preventing changes in the circumstances relevant to the determination of the application"; see: Re C (Abduction: Interim Directions: Accommodation by Local Authority) [2004] 1 FLR 653.

Following the interim proceedings an attempt was made at mediation but this failed. On 28 May 2004 the Family Division found that the child was settled in her new environment and held that a return order could not therefore be made. On 19 October 2004 the Court of Appeal however rejected the legal interpretation given to Article 12(2) and ordered that the matter as to whether the child was settled in her new environment be remitted to the High Court for determination.

Ruling

Return refused; the child was settled in her new environment and the court exercised its discretion not to make a return order.

INCADAT comment

The views of the abducted child were also taken into account in assessing settlement in the French appellate decision: CA Paris 27 October 2005, 05/15032 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 814].

Following the refusal of the return petition there was a substantive custody hearing to determine the fate of the child. This resulted in the mother being awarded residence and the father unsupervised contact, see: Re SC (A Child) [2005] EWHC 2205 (Fam).

Summaries of the original trial judgment and the subsequent appeal court judgment may be found at: Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245 (Fam) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 596]; Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 598]. During the period of concealment of his daughter the father in the instant case lobbied for greater judicial intervention in California in abduction cases, this resulted in a state law being passed, known as the Synclair-Cannon Child Abduction Prevention Act of 2002.

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Settlement of the Child

A uniform interpretation has not emerged with regard to the concept of settlement; in particular whether it should be construed literally or rather in accordance with the policy objectives of the Convention.  In jurisdictions favouring the latter approach the burden of proof on the abducting parent is clearly greater and the exception is more difficult to establish.

Jurisdictions in which a heavy burden of proof has been attached to the establishment of settlement include:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 106]

In this case it was held that settlement is more than mere adjustment to surroundings. It involves a physical element of relating to, being established in, a community and an environment. It also has an emotional constituent denoting security and stability.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598]

For academic criticism of Re N. see:

Collins L. et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws, 14th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2006, paragraph 19-121.

However, it may be noted that a more recent development in England has been the adoption of a child-centric assessment of settlement by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  This ruling may impact on the previous case law.

However there was no apparent weakening of the standard in the non-Convention case Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649,[INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107]

For Article 12(2) to be activated the interest of the child in not being uprooted must be so cogent that it outweighs the primary purpose of the Convention, namely the return of the child to the proper jurisdiction so that the child's future may be determined in the appropriate place.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

A settled situation was one which could reasonably be relied upon to last as matters stood and did not contain indications that it was likely to change radically or to fall apart. There had therefore to be some projection into the future.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]

United States of America
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf  134]

A literal interpretation of the concept of settlement has been favoured in:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 291];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

The impact of the divergent interpretations is arguably most marked where very young children are concerned.

It has been held that settlement is to be considered from the perspective of a young child in:

Austria
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 378];

Australia
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 823];

State Central Authority v. C.R [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

Israel
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 938];

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/MC 510];

Switzerland
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (District Court of St. Gallen) (Switzerland), decision of 8 September 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 431].

A child-centric approach has also been adopted in several significant appellate decisions with regard to older children, with emphasis placed on the children's views.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

In contrast, a more objective assessment was favoured in the United States decision:

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S.2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 208]
The children, aged 3 and 1 1/2, had not established significant ties to their community in Brooklyn; they were not involved in school, extra-curricular, community, religious or social activities which children of an older age would be.

Concealment

Where children are concealed in the State of refuge courts are reluctant to make a finding of settlement, even if many years elapse before their discovery:

Canada (7 years elapsed)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 754];

See however the decision of the Cour d'appel de Montréal in:

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 December 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

United Kingdom - Scotland (2 ½ years elapsed)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, 2008 S.C.L.R. 329 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962];

Switzerland (4 years elapsed)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne (Magistrates' Court), decision of 6 July 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 434];

United States of America
(2 ½ years elapsed)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 125];

(3 years elapsed)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 138].

Non-return orders have been made where notwithstanding the concealment the children have still been able to lead open lives:

United Kingdom - England & Wales (4 years elapsed)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 815];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region) (4 ¾ years elapsed)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825].

Equitable Tolling

In accordance with this principle the one year time limit in Article 12 is only deemed to commence from the date of the discovery of the children. The rationale being that otherwise an abducting parent who concealed children for more than a year would be rewarded for their misconduct by creating eligibility for an affirmative defence which was not otherwise available.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578].

The principle of 'equitable tolling' in the context of the time limit specified in Article 12 has been rejected in other jurisdictions, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 598];

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/HK 825];

New Zealand
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 1127].

Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

Unlike the Article 13 exceptions, Article 12(2) does not expressly afford courts a discretion to make a return order if settlement is established.  Where this issue has arisen for consideration the majority judicial view has nevertheless been to apply the provision as if a discretion does exist, but this has arisen in different ways.

Australia
The matter has not been conclusively decided but there would appear to be appellate support for inferring a discretion, reference has been made to English and Scottish case law, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 276].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
English case law initially favoured inferring that a Convention based discretion existed by virtue of Article 18, see:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598].

However, this interpretation was expressly rejected in the House of Lords decision Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  A majority of the panel held that the construction of Article 12(2) left the matter open that there was an inherent discretion where settlement was established.  It was pointed out that Article 18 did not confer any new power to order the return of a child under the Convention, rather it contemplated powers conferred by domestic law.

Ireland
In accepting the existence of a discretion reference was made to early English authority and Article 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 391].

New Zealand
A discretion derives from the domestic legislation implementing the Convention, see:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 882].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Whilst the matter was not explored in any detail, settlement not being established, there was a suggestion that a discretion would exist, with reference being made to Article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107].

There have been a few decisions in which no discretion was found to attach to Article 12(2), these include:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232], - subsequently questioned;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 596] - subsequently overruled;

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

Article 18 not being included in the act implementing the Convention in Quebec, it is understood that courts do not possess a discretionary power where settlement is established.

For academic commentary on the use of discretion where settlement is established, see:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 204 et seq.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.

Faits

La demande concernait une enfant de 10 ans né d'un père américain et d'une mère irlandaise. La famille vivait en Californie et l'enfant y avait vécu jusqu'à ce que la mère la retienne en Irlande à la fin d'une période de vacances, en décembre 1998. Le père entama alors une demande de retour en application de la Convention de La Haye.

En juillet 1999, les parents trouvèrent un accord selon lequel l'enfant rentrerait aux Etats-Unis. Ce fut effectivement le cas, mais la mère déplaça l'enfant peu après. Celle-ci ne fut pas localisée jusqu'à l'automne 2003, lorsqu'il fut découvert qu'elle vivait sous une fausse identité à Liverpool en Angleterre. Le 15 octobre l'enfant fut placée auprès des services sociaux pendant l'instance de retour. Le 31 octobre, elle retourna avec sa mère, mais dans des conditions très strictes dont l'une imposait à la mère de porter un bracelet électronique.

Le 12 décembre, la High Court rendit une ordonnance provisoire relative au pouvoir d'un juge en application du droit anglais de demander à une autorité locale dans le cadre d'une procédure relevant de la Convention de La Haye de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires au placement de l'enfant auprès d'une personne, institution ou agence lorsqu'un tel placement s'avère nécessaire « à la garantie du bien-être de l'enfant en cause ou à la prévention de tout changement de circonstances qui pourraient influer sur la decision », voy: Re C (Abduction: Interim Directions: Accommodation by Local Authority) [2004] 1 FLR 653.

A l'issue de la procédure au provisoire, une tentative de conciliation échoua. Le 28 mai 2004, la chambre familiale de la cour estima que l'enfant s'était intégrée à son nouveau milieu et décida de ne pas ordonner le retour de l'enfant. Le 19 octobre 2004, la cour d'appel rejeta l'interprétation donnée à l'article 12 alinéa 2 par le premlier juge et renvoya l'affaire à la High Court afin qu'elle détermine si l'enfant s'était bien intégrée à son nouveau milieu.

Dispositif

Retour refusé ; l'enfant s'était intégrée dans son nouveau milieu. La cour décida dans le cadre de son pouvoir souverain d'appréciation de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Commentaire INCADAT

La perspective de l'enfant fut également prise en compte afin de déterminer l'intégration de l'enfant dans son nouveau milieu dans la décision de la cour d'appel française : CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814].

A la suite du refus du retour la question de la garde de l'enfant fut examinée. La mère obtint la résidence de l'enfant et le père un droit de visite non surveillé. Voy. : Re SC (A Child) [2005] EWHC 2205 (Fam).

Voy. les résumés des décisions rendues dans la même affaire : Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245 (Fam) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 596]; Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598]. Pendant la période où sa fille était cachée, le père agit en faveur d'un plus grand interventionnisme judiciaire en matière d'enlèvements en Californie. Son activisme conduit à une nouvelle législation fédérale, le 'Synclair-Cannon Child Abduction Prevention Act' en 2002.

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Intégration de l'enfant

La notion d'intégration ne fait pas encore l'objet d'une interprétation uniforme. La question se pose notamment de savoir si l'intégration doit s'entendre littéralement ou être interprétée à la lumière des objectifs de la Convention. Dans les États faisant prévaloir la deuxième alternative, la charge de la preuve est plus lourde pour le parent ravisseur et l'exception d'application plus rare.

Parmi les États les plus exigeants en ce qui concerne la preuve de l'intégration de l'enfant, on peut citer :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re N. (Minors) (Abduction) [1991] 1 FLR 413, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 106] ;
Dans cette espèce, il fut décidé que la notion d'intégration dépassait celle d'adaptation au nouveau milieu. L'intégration implique un élément de relation physique avec une communauté et un environnement. Elle contient un élément émotionnel traduisant la sécurité et la stabilité.

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Pour un commentaire critique de Re N., voir :

L.Collins et al., Dicey, Morris & Collins on the Conflict of Laws: fourteenth edition, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 2006, para. 19 à 121.

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment l'Angleterre a vu se développer une analyse de la notion d'intégration centrée sur l'enfant. On se réfèrera à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. Cette décision pourrait remettre en cause la jurisprudence antérieure.

Toutefois cette décision n'a apparemment pas affaibli les exigences posées en la matière par la Common Law comme en témoigne Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Pour que l'article 12(2) trouve à s'appliquer, il faut que l'intérêt qu'a l'enfant à rester dans son nouveau milieu soit si fort qu'il dépasse l'objectif premier de la Convention selon lequel il appartient au juge du lieu de la résidence habituelle qu'avait l'enfant au moment de l'enlèvement de décider de l'avenir de celui-ci.

P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963]

L'intégration existe dans les situations stables, dont on peut s'attendre qu'elles durent. Il convient d'opérer une certaine projection dans l'avenir.

C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962]

États-Unis d'Amérique
In re Interest of Zarate, No. 96 C 50394 (N.D. Ill. Dec. 23, 1996), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf  134]

Une interprétation littérale du concept d'intégration a été préférée dans les États suivants :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Community Services v. M. and C. and the Child Representative (1998) FLC 92-829; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 291];

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825]

L'impact de la différence d'interprétation est sans doute plus marqué lorsque ce sont des jeunes enfants qui sont en cause.

Il a été décidé que l'intégration doit s'apprécier du point de vue du jeune enfant en :

Autriche
7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof, 17/05/1990, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 378] ;

Australie
Secretary, Attorney-General's Department v. T.S. (2001) FLC 93-063, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 823] ;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824] ;

Israël
Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit,  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938] ;

Monaco
R 6136; M. Le Procureur Général contre M. H. K, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/MC 510] ;

Suisse
Präsidium des Bezirksgerichts St. Gallen (Cour cantonale de St. Gallen) (Suisse), décision du 8 Septembre 1998, 4 PZ 98-0217/0532N, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 431].

Une approche centrée sur l'enfant a également été adoptée dans des décisions importantes rendues à propos d'enfants plus grands, l'accent étant mis sur l'opinion de l'enfant.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937];

France
CA Paris 27 Octobre 2005, 05/15032, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 814];

Québec
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

En revanche, c'est une analyse plus objective de l'intégration qui a été préférée aux États-Unis d'Amérique :

David S. v. Zamira S., 151 Misc. 2d 630, 574 N.Y.S. 2d 429 (Fam. Ct. 1991), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 208];
Les enfants, âgés de 3 ans et 1 an ½ n'avaient pas établi de liens importants dans leur nouveau milieu de Brooklyn. Ils ne participaient pas aux activités scolaires, extrascolaires, religieuses, sociales ou communautaires auxquelles des enfants plus âgés se livrent.

Dissimulation de l'enfant

Lorsque des enfants sont cachés dans l'État de refuge, les juges sont réticents à l'idée de considérer qu'il y a eu intégration, même lorsque de nombreuses années se sont écoulées entre le déplacement et la localisation :

Canada (7 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/CA 754] ;

Voir cependant la décision de la Cour d'appel de Montréal dans :

Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de  Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse (2 ans et demi entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962];

Suisse (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Justice de Paix du cercle de Lausanne, 6 juillet 2000, J 765 CIEV 112E, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 434];

États-Unis d'Amérique
(2 ans et demi  entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Lops v. Lops, 140 F. 3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125] ;

(3 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
In re Coffield, 96 Ohio App. 3d 52, 644 N.E. 2d 662 (1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 138]. 

Dans certains États, le retour d'enfants a été ordonné alors même qu'ils menaient une vie relativement ouverte en dépit du fait qu'ils étaient recherchés :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (4 ans entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) (No 2) [2005] 1 FLR 938, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 815] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong) (4 ans 3/4 entre l'enlèvement et la localisation)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825].

Principe de la suspension équitable du délai de prescription (« equitable tolling »)

L'utilisation de ce principe impose que le calcul du délai d'un an contenu à l'article 12 ne commence qu'à partir du moment où l'enfant a pu être localisé. Un parent ravisseur qui a caché l'enfant pendant plus d'un an pourrait sinon bénéficier d'une exception (qui devrait lui être fermée en principe), et ce, pour la seule raison qu'il s'est comporté de manière inacceptable.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

Le principe de la suspension équitable du délai de prescription (« equitable tolling ») a été rejeté dans le contexte de l'application de l'article 12(2) par certains États :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598] ;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
H.J. v. Secretary for Justice [2006] NZFLR 1005 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1127].

Pouvoir d'ordonner le retour nonobstant l'intégration

Au contraire de l'exception de l'article 13, l'article 12(2) ne prévoit pas expressément la possibilité pour les juridictions saisies de la demande de retour de disposer d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour ordonner le retour en cas d'intégration. Lorsque la question s'est posée, il apparaît néanmoins que les cours ont majoritairement  admis le caractère discrétionnaire de l'application de cette disposition.  La question s'est toutefois posée en des termes très variables :

Australie
La question n'a pas été définitivement résolue mais il semble que la Cour d'appel a sous-entendu le caractère discrétionnaire de l'article 12(2), référence faite à la jurisprudence anglaise et écossaise. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 276].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La jurisprudence anglaise déduisait l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire de l'article 18, voir :

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Toutefois cette interprétation a été expressément rejetée par la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. La majorité des juges estima que l'article 12(2) laissait ouverte la question de savoir si le retour pouvait discrétionnairement être ordonné nonobstant l'intégration. Les juges soulignèrent que l'article 18 ne donne pas un nouveau pouvoir d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant mais se réfère simplement à un pouvoir préexistant en droit interne.

Irlande
Il a été fait référence à la jurisprudence ancienne anglaise et à l'article 18 pour justifier l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire :

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 391];

Nouvelle-Zélande
En Nouvelle-Zélande, le pouvoir discrétionnaire est prévu par la législation de mise en œuvre de la Convention. Voir :

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J.) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Quoique la question n'ait pas été envisagée en détail puisqu'en l'espèce il n'y avait pas eu intégration, il fut suggéré que l'application de l'exception avait un caractère discrétionnaire, référence étant faite à l'article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Parmi les décisions qui n'ont pas usé de pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12(2), voir :

Australie
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232], - ultérieurement discuté;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, (Fam), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 596] - ultérieurement remis en cause;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

L'article 18 n'ayant pas été reproduit dans la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention au Québec, il a été considéré que le juge ne dispose pas d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en cas d'intégration.

Sur l'usage d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsque l'enfant enlevé s'est intégré dans son nouveau milieu, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 204 et seq.

R. Schuz, « In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Art 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention » Child and Family Law Quarterly, 2008.