CASE

No full text available

Case Name

7Ob573/90 Oberster Gerichtshof

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AT 378

Court

Country

AUSTRIA

Name

Oberster Gerichtshof

Level

Superior Appellate Court

States involved

Requesting State

SPAIN

Requested State

AUSTRIA

Decision

Date

17 May 1990

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b) 19 12(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 12(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
EFSlg 16.707, 37.151, 52.674, 52.796; ÖJZ 1989,743ff; RZ 1983/62; SZ 46/53.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Exercise of Discretion
Settlement of the child
Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a girl, was 15 months old at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. She had lived in Spain since birth. The parents were married and both had joint rights of custody. On 26 June 1988 the mother brought the child to Austria without the consent of the father.

On 29 December 1989 return proceedings were initiated by the father.

On 30 January 1990 the District Court of Spittal an der Drau refused the return of the child on the basis that the child had become settled in her new environment (Article 12(2)) and a return would place the child in an intolerable situation (Article 13(1)(b)).

On 15 March 1990 the Appellate Court (Landesgericht Klagenfurt) confirmed this decision. The father appealed to the Supreme Court.

Ruling

Challenge to legality dismissed; the removal was wrongful but the child had become settled in her new environment. The return was therefore refused.

INCADAT comment

Exercise of Discretion

Where it is established that a child objects to a return and he is of sufficient age and maturity at which it is appropriate to take his views into account, then the Court seised of the case will have a discretion whether or not to make a return order.

Different approaches have been espoused as to the manner in which this discretion should be exercised and the relevant factors that should be taken into consideration.

Australia 
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 904]

The appellate court found that the trial judge had erred in ruling that there had to be 'clear and compelling' reasons to frustrate the objectives of the Convention. The Court recalled that there were permitted exceptions to a mandatory return and where established these exceptions gave rise to a discretion. The relevant factors in the exercise of that discretion would vary according to each case, but would include giving significant weight to the objectives of the Convention in appropriate cases.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The exercise of the discretion has caused difficulty for the Court of Appeal, in particular the factors to be considered and the weight to be accorded to them.

In the first key case: 

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 87]

The Court of Appeal held that a court's discretion to refuse the immediate return of a child must be exercised with regard to the overall approach of the Convention, i.e. a child's best interests are furthered by a prompt return, unless there are exceptional circumstances for ordering otherwise.

In Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 60] contrasting views were put forward by two members of the panel.

Balcombe L.J., who was content for there to be a relatively flexible approach to the gateway findings of age and objection, held that the weight to be given to objections would vary with the age of the child, but the policy of the Convention would always be a very weighty factor.

Millet L.J., who advocated a stricter interpretation of the gateway filters, held that if it was appropriate to consider the views of a child then those views should prevail unless there were countervailing factors, which would include the policy of the Convention.

The third member of the panel gave his support to the interpretation of Balcombe L.J.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. took up the interpretation of Millett L.J.

The reasoning of Re. T. was implicitly accepted by a differently constituted Court of Appeal in:

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 579].

However, it was rejected in Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 813].

The correct approach to the exercise of judicial discretion in England is now clearly that advanced by Balcombe L.J.

In Zaffino v. Zaffino the Court also held that regard could be paid to welfare considerations in the exercise of the discretion.  In that case, welfare considerations militated in favour of a return.

In Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 829] the Court of Appeal considered how discretion should be exercised in a case governed by the Brussels II a Regulation.  It held that the aims and policy of the Regulation had to be considered in addition to the policy of the Convention.

In Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901] the Court gave a general consideration to welfare considerations in deciding not to order the return of the 8 year old girl concerned.

The Court also appeared to accept an obiter comment raised in Vigreux v. Michel that there had to be an ‘exceptional' dimension to a case before a Court might consider exercising its discretion against a return order.

Exceptionality was raised in Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 964].  There a return order was made notwithstanding the strong objections of an independent 12 year old.  Particular emphasis was placed on the fact that the girl had come for a 2 week vacation.

In Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937] the House of Lords affirmed that it was wrong to import any test of exceptionality into the exercise of discretion under the Hague Convention. The circumstances in which a return may be refused were themselves exceptions to the general rule. That in itself was sufficient exceptionality. It was neither necessary nor desirable to import an additional gloss into the Convention.

Baroness Hale continued that where a discretion arose from the terms of the Convention itself, the discretion was at large.  In Article 13(2) cases the court would have to consider the nature and strength of the child's objections, the extent to which they were authentically the child's own or the product of the influence of the abducting parent, the extent to which they coincided or were at odds with other considerations which were relevant to the child's welfare, as well as general Convention considerations. The older the child, the greater the weight that objections would likely carry.

New Zealand
The Balcombe / Millett interpretations gave rise to contrasting High Court judgments. The Court of Appeal however voiced its preference for the Balcombe ‘shades of grey' approach in:

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 902].

United Kingdom - Scotland
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 963]

When exercising his discretion to make a return order, the trial judge noted that a return order should not be refused unless there were sound reasons for not giving effect to the objects of the Convention.  This was upheld on appeal.  The Inner House of the Court of Session further held that the existence of the Article 13 exceptions did not negate or eliminate the general policy of the Convention that wrongfully removed children should be returned.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 197]

The Court held that the welfare of the child was a general factor which should be taken into account in the exercise of discretion. A court should not limit itself to a consideration of the child's objection and the reasons for it. Nevertheless, the court held that a rule could not be laid down as to whether a child's welfare should be considered broadly or in detail; this was a matter within the discretion of the court concerned.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House held that a balancing exercise had to be carried out, and one of the factors in favour of return was the spirit and purpose of the Convention to allow the court of habitual residence to resolve the custody dispute.

United States of America
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 903].

In upholding the views of a 14 year old boy the Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit paid regard to his best interests but not to the policy of the Convention.

France
An appellate court limited the weight to be placed on the objections of the children on the basis that before being interviewed they had had no contact with the applicant parent and had spent a long period of time with the abducting parent. Moreover the allegations of the children had already been considered by the authorities in the children's State of habitual residence:

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 947].

Discretion to make a Return Order where Settlement is established

Unlike the Article 13 exceptions, Article 12(2) does not expressly afford courts a discretion to make a return order if settlement is established.  Where this issue has arisen for consideration the majority judicial view has nevertheless been to apply the provision as if a discretion does exist, but this has arisen in different ways.

Australia
The matter has not been conclusively decided but there would appear to be appellate support for inferring a discretion, reference has been made to English and Scottish case law, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 276].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
English case law initially favoured inferring that a Convention based discretion existed by virtue of Article 18, see:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 598].

However, this interpretation was expressly rejected in the House of Lords decision Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].  A majority of the panel held that the construction of Article 12(2) left the matter open that there was an inherent discretion where settlement was established.  It was pointed out that Article 18 did not confer any new power to order the return of a child under the Convention, rather it contemplated powers conferred by domestic law.

Ireland
In accepting the existence of a discretion reference was made to early English authority and Article 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 391].

New Zealand
A discretion derives from the domestic legislation implementing the Convention, see:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 882].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Whilst the matter was not explored in any detail, settlement not being established, there was a suggestion that a discretion would exist, with reference being made to Article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 107].

There have been a few decisions in which no discretion was found to attach to Article 12(2), these include:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232], - subsequently questioned;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 824];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 596] - subsequently overruled;

China - (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 653].

Article 18 not being included in the act implementing the Convention in Quebec, it is understood that courts do not possess a discretionary power where settlement is established.

For academic commentary on the use of discretion where settlement is established, see:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 204 et seq.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.

Faits

L'enfant, une fille, était âgée de 15 mois à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Elle avait passé toute sa vie en Espagne. Les parents étaient mariés et avaient conjointement la garde de l'enfant. Le 26 juin 1988, la mère emmena l'enfant en Autriche sans le consentement du père.

Le 29 décembre 1989 le père demanda le retour de l'enfant.

Le 30 janvier 1990, le juge de première instance de Spittal an der Drau (Autriche) refusa d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant, au motif que celui-ci s'était intégré dans son nouveau milieu (article 12 alinéa 2) et que le retour l'exposerait à une situation intolérable (article 13 alinéa 1 b).

Le 15 mars 1990, la cour d'appel (Landesgericht) de Klagenfurt (Autriche) confirma cette décision. Le père saisit la cour suprême d'un recours contre cette décision.

Dispositif

Le recours a été rejeté ; retour refusé. Le déplacement était illicite, mais l'enfant s'était intégrée dans son nouveau milieu.

Commentaire INCADAT

Exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire

Lorsqu'il est établi qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour et a un âge et une maturité suffisants pour qu'il soit approprié de tenir compte de son opinion, le tribunal saisi a un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour décider d'ordonner ou non le retour de l'enfant. 

Des approches différentes se sont fait jour quant à la manière dont ce pouvoir discrétionnaire peut être exercé et quant aux différents facteurs à considérer dans ce cadre. 

Australie        
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 904]

La Cour d'appel estima que le juge du premier degré n'aurait pas dû considérer qu'il devait y avoir des arguments « clairs et convaincants » pour aller à l'encontre des objectifs de la Convention. La Cour rappela que la Convention prévoyait un nombre limité d'exceptions au retour et que si ces exceptions étaient applicables, la Cour disposait d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire. Il convenait pour cela de s'intéresser à l'ensemble des circonstances de la cause tout en accordant si nécessaire, un poids important aux objectifs de la Convention.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
L'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire a causé des difficultés à la Cour d'appel notamment en ce qui concerne les éléments à prendre en compte et le poids qu'il convenait de leur accorder. 

Dans la première décision phare, Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 87], la Cour d'appel estima que le pouvoir discrétionnaire de refuser le retour immédiat d'un enfant devait être exercé en tenant compte de l'approche globale de la Convention, c'est-à-dire de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant à être renvoyé, à moins que des circonstances exceptionnelles existent qui conduisent au refus.

Dans Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60], des opinions différentes furent défendues par deux des juges d'appel :

Le juge Balcombe L.J., favorable à une approche relativement flexible quant aux éléments de l'âge et de l'opposition,  défendit l'idée que certes l'importance  à accorder à l'opposition de l'enfant devait varier en fonction de son âge mais qu'en tout état de cause, les objectifs de la Convention devaient être un facteur primordial. 

Le juge Millet L.J., qui soutenait une approche plus stricte des conditions d'application de l'exception - âge et opposition - se prononça en faveur de l'idée que l'opposition de l'enfant devait prévaloir à moins que des éléments contraires, y compris les objectifs de la Convention, doivent primer.

Le troisième juge se rangea à l'opinion du juge Balcombe L.J.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. suivit l'interprétation du juge Millett L.J.

Le raisonnement de Re. T fut ensuite implicitement suivi par un collège de juges autrement composé de la Cour d'appel :

Re J. (Children) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 579]

Il fut toutefois rejeté dans l'affaire Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 813].

La jurisprudence anglaise suit désormais l'approche du juge Balcombe L.J.

Dans Zaffino v. Zaffino, la cour estima qu'il convenait également de tirer les conséquences du principe de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant.  Cet intérêt militait en l'espèce en faveur du retour. 

Dans Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 829] la Cour d'appel considéra comment ce pouvoir discrétionnaire devait s'appliquer dans les affaires régies par le Règlement de Bruxelles II bis. Elle estima que les buts et objectifs du Règlement devaient être pris en compte en plus des objectifs de la Convention. 

Dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901] la Cour suivit l'intérêt de l'enfant et refusa d'ordonner le retour de la fillette de 8 ans qui était en cause. La Cour sembla suivre le commentaire obiter exprimé dans Vigreux selon lequel la décision de ne pas ordonner le retour d'un enfant devait être liée à une dimension « exceptionnelle » du cas.

La dimension exceptionnelle fut discutée dans l'affaire Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 964]. Une ordonnance de retour fut prononcée nonobstant l'opposition forte d'une enfant indépendante de 12 ans. En l'espèce le fait que le problème était apparu à l'occasion de vacances de 2 semaines fut un facteur déterminant.

Dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937] la Chambre des Lords affirma qu'il convenait de ne pas importer la notion de caractère exceptionnel dans le cadre de l'exercice d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire ouvert par la Convention. Les circonstances dans lesquelles le retour peut être refusé sont elles-mêmes des exceptions au principe général, ce qui en soi est une dimension exceptionnelle suffisante. Il n'était ni nécessaire ni désirable d'exiger une dimension exceptionnelle supplémentaire.

Le juge Hale ajouta que lorsque la Convention ouvre la porte à un exercice discrétionnaire, ce pouvoir discrétionnaire était illimité. Dans les affaires relevant de l'article 13(2), il appartenait aux juges de considérer la nature et la force de l'opposition de l'enfant, dans quelle mesure cette opposition émane de l'enfant lui-même ou est influencée par le parent ravisseur, et enfin, dans quelle mesure cette opposition est dans le prolongement de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant et des objectifs généraux de la Convention. Plus l'enfant était âgé, plus son opposition devait en principe compter.

Nouvelle-Zélande
Les interprétations de Balcombe / Millett donnèrent lieu à des jugements contrastés de la High Court. Toutefois, la Cour d'appel s'exprima en faveur de l'approche de Balcombe dans :

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 902].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 963

Dans le cadre de l'exercice de son pouvoir discrétionnaire d'ordonner le retour, le juge de première instance avait observé que le retour devait être ordonné à moins que de bonnes raisons justifient qu'il soit fait exception à la Convention. Cette position fut approuvée par la cour d'appel, qui estima que l'existence des exceptions ne niait pas le principe général selon lequel les enfants victimes de déplacements illicites devaient être renvoyés.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 197]

La Cour estima que le bien-être de l'enfant était un élément à prendre en compte dans le cadre de  l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire. Le juge ne devait pas se limiter à une simple considération de l'opposition de l'enfant et de ses raisons. Toutefois la Cour décida qu'aucune règle ne pouvait s'appliquer quant à la question de savoir si l'intérêt de l'enfant devait s'entendre de manière large ou faire l'objet d'une analyse détaillée ; cette question relevait du pouvoir discrétionnaire de la cour. 

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805], l'instance d'appel estima qu'il convenait de mettre en balance tous les éléments, l'un des éléments en faveur du retour étant l'esprit et l'objectif de la Convention de faire en sorte que la question de la garde soit tranchée dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant. 

États-Unis d'Amérique
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 903

La Cour d'appel tint compte de l'opposition d'un enfant de 14 ans, tirant les conséquences de son intérêt supérieur mais non de l'objectif de la Convention.

France
Une juridiction d'appel modéra la force probante de l'opposition au motif que les enfants avaient vécu longuement avec le parent et sans contact avec le parent victime avant d'être entendus, observant également que les faits dénoncés par les enfants avaient par ailleurs été pris en compte par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle:

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947].

Pouvoir d'ordonner le retour nonobstant l'intégration

Au contraire de l'exception de l'article 13, l'article 12(2) ne prévoit pas expressément la possibilité pour les juridictions saisies de la demande de retour de disposer d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour ordonner le retour en cas d'intégration. Lorsque la question s'est posée, il apparaît néanmoins que les cours ont majoritairement  admis le caractère discrétionnaire de l'application de cette disposition.  La question s'est toutefois posée en des termes très variables :

Australie
La question n'a pas été définitivement résolue mais il semble que la Cour d'appel a sous-entendu le caractère discrétionnaire de l'article 12(2), référence faite à la jurisprudence anglaise et écossaise. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 276].

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
La jurisprudence anglaise déduisait l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire de l'article 18, voir :

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 598].

Toutefois cette interprétation a été expressément rejetée par la Chambre des Lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937]. La majorité des juges estima que l'article 12(2) laissait ouverte la question de savoir si le retour pouvait discrétionnairement être ordonné nonobstant l'intégration. Les juges soulignèrent que l'article 18 ne donne pas un nouveau pouvoir d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant mais se réfère simplement à un pouvoir préexistant en droit interne.

Irlande
Il a été fait référence à la jurisprudence ancienne anglaise et à l'article 18 pour justifier l'existence d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire :

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 391];

Nouvelle-Zélande
En Nouvelle-Zélande, le pouvoir discrétionnaire est prévu par la législation de mise en œuvre de la Convention. Voir :

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J.) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 882]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Quoique la question n'ait pas été envisagée en détail puisqu'en l'espèce il n'y avait pas eu intégration, il fut suggéré que l'application de l'exception avait un caractère discrétionnaire, référence étant faite à l'article 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 107]

Parmi les décisions qui n'ont pas usé de pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12(2), voir :

Australie
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232], - ultérieurement discuté;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 824];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, (Fam), [Référence INCADAT :  HC/E/UKe 596] - ultérieurement remis en cause;

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 825];

Canada (Québec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-973 , [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 653].

L'article 18 n'ayant pas été reproduit dans la loi mettant en œuvre la Convention au Québec, il a été considéré que le juge ne dispose pas d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire en cas d'intégration.

Sur l'usage d'un pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsque l'enfant enlevé s'est intégré dans son nouveau milieu, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 204 et seq.

R. Schuz, « In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Art 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention » Child and Family Law Quarterly, 2008.

Hechos

La menor tenía quince meses en la fecha del supuesto traslado ilícito. Había vivido en España desde su nacimiento. Los padres estaban casados y ambos gozaban de derechos de custodia conjunta. El 26 de junio de 1988, la madre llevó a la menor a Austria sin el consentimiento del padre. El 29 de diciembre de 1989, el padre inició un proceso de restitución.

El 30 de enero de 1990, el District Court (Tribunal de Distrito) de Spittal an der Drau denegó la restitución de la menor sobre la base de que la menor se había establecido en su nuevo entorno (art. 12(2)) y una restitución colocaría a la menor en una situación intolerable (art. 13(1)(b)).

El 15 de marzo de 1990, el Landesgericht Klagenfurt (Tribunal de Apelaciones) confirmó esta decisión. El padre apeló ante la Supreme Court (Corte Suprema).

Fallo

Se rechazó la impugnación a la legalidad; el traslado fue ilícito pero la menor se había establecido en su nuevo entorno. Por lo tanto, se rechazó la restitución.

Comentario INCADAT

Ejercicio de la facultad discrecional

Cuando se determina que un menor se opone a la restitución y ha alcanzado una edad y un grado de madurez suficientes para que sea apropiado tener en cuenta sus opiniones, el tribunal que entiende en el caso tendrá la facultad discrecional para ordenar la restitución del menor o no hacerlo.

Se han propugnado diferentes enfoques respecto de la manera en la que debe ejercerse esta facultad discrecional y los factores relevantes que deben tenerse en consideración.

Australia
Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 904]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones determinó que el tribunal de primera instancia había cometido un error al decidir que debía haber motivos "claros y convincentes" para frustrar los fines del Convenio. El Tribunal recordó que el Convenio prevé un número limitado que excepciones a la restitución obligatoria y que, cuando son aplicables, el juez dispone de una facultad discrecional. Los factores relevantes en el ejercicio de la facultad discrecional serían distintos según el caso pero abarcarían conferirle un peso significativo a los fines del Convenio en los casos pertinentes.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
El ejercicio de la facultad discrecional ha resultado problemático para el Tribunal de Apelaciones, en particular, los factores que deben tenerse en cuenta y el peso que debe otorgársele a cada uno de ellos.

En el primer caso clave: 

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 87]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la facultad discrecional de un tribunal para rechazar la restitución inmediata de un menor debe ser ejercida teniendo en cuenta el enfoque global del Convenio, esto es, que el interés superior del menor se promueve mediante la pronta restitución, excepto que existan circunstancias extraordinarias para emitir una orden distinta.

En Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60] dos miembros de la sala expresaron opiniones encontradas.

Lord Justice Balcombe, que propugnaba un enfoque relativamente flexible respecto de la determinación inicial de edad y objeción a la restitución, sostuvo que la importancia que debía otorgarse a las objeciones variaría según la edad del menor, sin embargo, la política del Convenio siempre sería un factor de mucho peso.

Lord Justice Millet, que defendía una interpretación más estricta de los filtros iniciales, sostuvo que, si correspondía considerar las opiniones del menor, dichas opiniones debían prevalecer, excepto que hubiera factores contrarios del mismo peso, entre ellos la política del Convenio.

El tercer miembro de la sala apoyó la interpretación de Lord Justice Balcombe.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270] Lord Justice Ward adoptó la interpretación de Lord Justice Millett.

El razonamiento de Re. T. fue aceptado implícitamente por un Tribunal de Apelaciones integrado por diferentes miembros en:

Re J. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2004] EWCA CIV 428, [2004] 2 FLR 64 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 579].

Sin embargo, fue rechazado en Zaffino v. Zaffino (Abduction: Children's Views) [2005] EWCA Civ 1012; [2006] 1 FLR 410 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 813].

El enfoque actual adecuado para el ejercicio de la facultad discrecional en Inglaterra es claramente el propugnado por Lord Justice Balcombe.

En Zaffino v. Zaffino, el tribunal también sostuvo que debía otorgarse importancia a los factores relativos al bienestar al momento de ejercer la facultad discrecional. En dicho caso, los factores relativos al bienestar favorecían la restitución.

En Vigreux v. Michel [2006] EWCA Civ 630, [2006] 2 FLR 1180 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 829], el Tribunal de Apelaciones consideró cómo debía ejercerse la facultad discrecional en un caso regulado por el Reglamento Bruselas II bis. Se determinó que, además de la política del Convenio, debían tenerse en cuenta los fines y la política del Reglamento.

En Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901], el Tribunal consideró de manera general los factores relativos al bienestar al decidir no ordenar la restitución de la menor de ocho años involucrada. El Tribunal también pareció aceptar un comentario no determinante del caso Vigreux v. Michel según el cual debía existir una dimensión "excepcional" en un caso antes de que el Tribunal pudiera considerar ejercer su facultad discrecional contra una orden de restitución.

En Nyachowe v. Fielder [2007] EWCA Civ 1129, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 964], se invocó la excepcionalidad. En dicho caso, se dictó una orden de restitución a pesar de las fuertes objeciones de una menor independiente de doce años de edad. Se puso particular énfasis en el hecho de que la menor había ido de vacaciones por dos semanas.

En Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937], la Cámara de los Lores sostuvo que era incorrecto importar criterio de excepcionalidad alguno al ejercicio de la facultad discrecional en virtud del Convenio de La Haya. Las circunstancias en las que podía denegarse la restitución constituían, en sí mismas, excepciones a la regla general. Eso mismo era una excepcionalidad suficiente. No era necesario ni deseable importar glosa adicional alguna al Convenio.

La Baronesa Hale agregó que cuando la facultad discrecional surgía de los términos del Convenio mismo, ésta era amplia. En los casos del artículo 13(2), el tribunal tendría que considerar la naturaleza y la solidez de las objeciones del menor, la medida en la que dichas objeciones eran verdaderamente del menor o el producto de la influencia del progenitor sustractor, la medida en la que coincidían o se contraponían con otras consideraciones relevantes para el bienestar del menor, así como consideraciones generales del Convenio. Cuanto mayor sea el menor, mayor importancia tendrán probablemente sus objeciones.

Nueva Zelanda
Las interpretaciones de Balcombe / Millett dieron lugar a decisiones contradictorias del Tribunal Superior. El Tribunal de Apelaciones, sin embargo, se pronunció a favor del enfoque de ‘gamas de gris' de Balcombe:

White v. Northumberland [2006] NZFLR 1105 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 902].

Reino Unido - Escocia
P. v. S., 2002 FamLR 2 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 963]

Al ejercer su facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución, el juez de primera instancia observó que no debía denegarse la orden de restitución excepto cuando hubiera motivos sensatos para no promover los fines del Convenio. Esto fue confirmado por el tribunal de apelaciones (Inner House of the Court of Session), el cual también sostuvo que la existencia de las excepciones del artículo 13 no negaba ni eliminaba la política general del Convenio según la cual deben restituirse los menores sustraídos ilícitamente.

Singh v. Singh 1998 SC 68 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 197]

El Tribunal sostuvo que el bienestar del menor era un factor general que debía ser considerado al ejercer la facultad discrecional. Un tribunal no debe limitarse a considerar la oposición del menor y los motivos por los cuales se opone a la restitución. Sin embargo, el tribunal sostuvo que no podía redactarse una norma respecto de si el bienestar del menor debía considerarse de manera amplia o detallada; éste era un asunto comprendido dentro del alcance de la facultad discrecional del tribunal en cuestión.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], el tribunal de apelaciones (Inner House) sostuvo que el ejercicio debía ser equilibrado y que uno de los factores a favor de la restitución era el espíritu y el fin del Convenio de permitirle al tribunal de residencia habitual resolver la controversia relativa a la custodia.

Estados Unidos de América
De Silva v. Pitts, 481 F.3d 1279, (10th Cir. 2007), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 903]

Al hacer lugar a las opiniones de un menor de catorce años, el Tribunal de Apelaciones del Décimo Circuito tomó en consideración su interés superior e hizo caso omiso de la política del Convenio.

Francia
El Tribunal de apelaciones valoró la fuerza probatoria de la oposición de los niños, teniendo en cuenta que los mismos habían estado durante un largo tiempo con el padre sustractor y sin contacto con el padre privado de los niños antes de ser escuchados, observando asimismo que los hechos denunciados por los niños habían sido tenidos en cuenta por las autoridades del Estado de la residencia habitual.

CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No 06/002739 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947].

Facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución cuando el menor se encuentra integrado al nuevo ambiente

A diferencia de las excepciones del artículo 13, el artículo 12(2) no otorga expresamente a los tribunales la facultad discrecional para emitir una orden de restitución si se comprueba su integración. Cuando ha surgido este tema para su consideración, la opinión de la mayoría judicial ha sido, sin embargo, aplicar la disposición como si existiera facultad discrecional, pero esto ha surgido de diferentes maneras.

Australia
La cuestión no se ha decidido de manera concluyente pero parecería haber respaldo, en la apelación, para inferir una facultad discrecional. Se ha hecho referencia a la jurisprudencia de Inglaterra y Escocia, ver:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care v. Moore, (1999) FLC 92-841 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 276].

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
La jurisprudencia inglesa inicialmente favoreció el inferir que existía una facultad discrecional basada en el Convenio en virtud del artículo 18, ver:

Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1991] 2 FLR 1, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 163];

Cannon v. Cannon [2004] EWCA CIV 1330, [2005] 1 FLR 169 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 598].

Sin embargo, esta interpretación fue rechazada expresamente en la decisión de la Cámara de los Lores Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]. Una mayoría de la sala sostuvo que la interpretación del artículo 12(2) dejaba abierta la cuestión de que existía una facultad discrecional inherente cuando se establece la integración. Se señaló que el artículo 18 no confería ninguna facultad nueva para ordenar la restitución de un menor en virtud del Convenio, sino que contemplaba facultades conferidas por el derecho interno.

Irlanda
Al aceptar la existencia de una facultad discrecional, se hizo referencia a la temprana doctrina inglesa y al artículo 18.

P. v. B. (No. 2) (Child Abduction: Delay) [1999] 4 IR 185; [1999] 2 ILRM 401 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IE 391].

Nueva Zelanda
Toda facultad discrecional deriva de la legislación interna que implementa el Convenio, ver:

Secretary for Justice (as the NZ Central Authority on behalf of T.J) v. H.J. [2006] NZSC 97, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 882].

Reino Unido - Escocia
Aunque no se exploró la cuestión en detalle, si no se establecía la integración, había un indicio de que existiría facultad discrecional, haciéndose referencia al artículo 18.

Soucie v. Soucie 1995 SC 134, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 107].

Ha habido algunas decisiones en las cuales se concluyó que no había facultad discrecional alguna atribuida al artículo 12(2), entre ellas:

Australia
State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232], - posteriormente cuestionada;

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 824];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re C. (Abduction: Settlement) [2004] EWHC 1245, [2005] 1 FLR 127, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 596] - posteriormente revocada;

China - (Región Administrativa Especial de Hong Kong)
A.C. v. P.C. [2004] HKMP 1238 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/HK 825];

Canadá (Quebec)
Droit de la Famille 2785, Cour d'appel de Montréal, 5 décembre 1997, No 500-09-005532-97, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 653].

Puesto que el artículo 18 no se encuentra incluido en la ley de implementación del Convenio en Quebec, se entiende que los tribunales no poseen facultad discrecional alguna cuando se ha establecido la integración del niño.

Para comentarios académicos sobre el uso de la facultad discrecional cuando se ha establecido la integración, ver:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999, en pág. 204 y ss.;

R. Schuz, ‘In Search of a Settled Interpretation of Article 12(2) of the Hague Child Abduction Convention' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly.