CASE

No full text available

Case Name

U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529

INCADAT reference

HC/E/NZ 472

Court

Country

NEW ZEALAND

Name

Family Court (Greymouth)

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Judge Callaghan

States involved

Requesting State

GERMANY

Requested State

NEW ZEALAND

Decision

Date

13 March 2002

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
M v M (High Court, Christchurch AP 14/01, 4 July 2001, Pankhurst Fraser JJ); Clarke v Carson (1995) 13 FRNZ 662; Re A (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] 2 WLR 536; Re A and anor (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1992] 1 ALL ER 929; Re A (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) (No 2) [1992] 3 WLR 538; Re A and anor (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) (No 2) [1993] 1 ALL ER 272; Damiano v Damiano [1993] NZFLR 548; Butterworths Family Law in New Zealand.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Limited Nature of the Exceptions
Discretionary Nature of Article 13
Acquiescence
Acquiescence
Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The two children, both girls, were almost 7 and 2 1/2 at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. They were both German nationals and had lived in Germany and Australia. Their mother was German and their father was born in New Zealand. The parents married in 1991 in Germany and both had rights of custody.

On 17 June 2001 the father took the children to New Zealand for a holiday with the mother's agreement. They were due to return on 8 August 2001. On or about 8 July the mother agreed that the children could pro-long their stay and a new return date was set for 13 September.

Some time in late July the father notified the mother that he wished to remain permanently in New Zealand. The mother was initially "hostile" and "upset". She later told the father he could retain the children in New Zealand and sent a facsimile on 23 August which outlined her reasons for having reached this decision. However, in October the mother informed the father that she wanted the children to be returned to Germany.

On 31 October the mother filed a return application under the Hague Convention.

Ruling

Retention wrongful and return ordered. Acquiescence on the part of the applicant parent was established to the standard required under Article 13(1)(a) but the court nevertheless exercised its discretion to order the return of the child. None of the other exceptions had been proved to the standard required under the Convention.

INCADAT comment

Reference was made in the judgment to an early English Court of Appeal decision on acquiescence: Re A (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] 2 WLR 536; Re A and anor (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1992] 1 ALL ER 929 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 48]. Had the Court been made aware of the subsequent decision of the House of Lords: Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72, [1997] 2 WLR 563, [1997] 2 All ER 225 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 46], it may have had less doubt in finding that the mother had not acquiesced by sending her letter in the aftermath of the retention.

Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Discretionary Nature of Article 13

The drafting of Article 13 makes clear that where one of the constituent exceptions is established to the standard required by the Convention, the making of a non-return order is not inevitable, rather the court seised of the return petition has a discretion whether or not to make a non-return order.

The most extensive recent overview of the exercise of the discretion to return in child abduction cases has come in the decision of the supreme United Kingdom jurisdiction, the House of Lords, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].

In that case Baroness Hale affirmed that it would be wrong to import any test of exceptionality into the exercise of discretion under the Hague Convention. The circumstances in which a return might be refused were themselves exceptions to the general rule. It was neither necessary nor desirable to import an additional gloss into the Convention.

The manner in which the discretion would be exercised would differ depending on the facts of the case; general policy considerations, including not only the swift return of abducted children, but also comity between Contracting States, mutual respect for judicial processes and deterrence of abductions, had to be weighed against the interests of the child in the individual case. A court would be entitled to take into account the various aspects of the Convention policy, alongside the circumstances which gave the court a discretion in the first place and the wider considerations of the child's rights and welfare. Sometimes Convention objectives would be given more weight than the other considerations and sometimes they would not.

The discretionary nature of the exceptions is seen most commonly within the context of Article 13(2) - objections of a mature child - but there are equally examples of return orders being granted notwithstanding other exceptions being established.


Consent

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 995];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267].


Acquiescence

New Zealand
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [INCADAT Cite: HC/E/NZ @472@].


Grave Risk

New Zealand
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT Cite: HC/E/NZ @538@].

It may be noted that in the English appeal Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ UKe @880@] Baroness Hale held that it was inconceivable that a child might be returned where a grave risk of harm was found to exist.

Acquiescence

There has been general acceptance that where the exception of acquiescence is concerned regard must be paid in the first instance to the subjective intentions of the left behind parent, see:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 981].

Considering the issue for the first time, Austria's supreme court held that acquiescence in a temporary state of affairs would not suffice for the purposes of Article 13(1) a), rather there had to be acquiescence in a durable change in habitual residence.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 545];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 851];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

In this case the House of Lords affirmed that acquiescence was not to be found in passing remarks or letters written by a parent who has recently suffered the trauma of the removal of his children.

Ireland
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 807];

New Zealand
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 533];

United Kingdom - Scotland
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 500];

South Africa
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 499];

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841].

In keeping with this approach there has also been a reluctance to find acquiescence where the applicant parent has sought initially to secure the voluntary return of the child or a reconciliation with the abducting parent, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/UKe 179];

Ireland
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 285];

United States of America
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 84];

In the Australian case Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 290] negotiation over the course of 12 months was taken to amount to acquiescence but, notably, in the court's exercise of its discretion it decided to make a return order.

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Faits

Les deux enfants, des filles, étaient âgées de presque 7 ans et 2 ans ½ à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Elles avaient toutes deux la nationalité allemande et avaient vécu à la fois en Allemagne et en Australie. Leur mère était allemande et leur père était né en Nouvelle-Zélande. Les parents s'étaient mariés en Allemagne en 1991 et avaient la garde conjointe des enfants.

Le 17 juin 2001, le père emmena les enfants en vacances en Nouvelle-Zélande avec l'accord de la mère. Ils étaient censés rentrer le 8 août 2001. Vers le 8 juillet, la mère accepta que les enfants puissent prolonger leur séjour et ne rentrer en Allemagne que le 13 septembre.

Vers la fin juillet, le père informa la mère de son désir de rester en Nouvelle-Zélande de manière permanente. La mère était contre cette idée et bouleversée par elle. Elle indiqua plus tard au père qu'il pouvait garder les enfants en Nouvelle-Zélande et envoya un fax daté du 23 août 2001 exposant les raisons de sa décision. Toutefois, en octobre, la mère demanda au père de ramener les enfants en Allemagne.

Le 31 octobre, elle forma une demande de retour en application de la Convention.

Dispositif

Non-retour illicite et retour ordonné. Il y avait bien un acquiescement au sens de l'article 13(1)(a) mais la cour usa de son pouvoir d'appréciation pour décider d'ordonner tout de même le retour. Aucune des autres exceptions n'étaient applicables.

Commentaire INCADAT

Le jugement fit référence à une ancienne décision de la Cour d'appel sur l'acquiescement : Re A (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] 2 WLR 536; Re A and anor (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1992] 1 ALL ER 929 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 48]. Si la décision ultérieure de la Chambre des Lords : Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72, [1997] 2 WLR 563, [1997] 2 All ER 225 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 46] avait été portée à la connaissance de la Cour, celle-ci aurait peut-être eu moins de doutes en concluant que la mère n'avait pas acquiescé en envoyant sa lettre suite à la retention.

Nature limitée des exceptions

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Nature discrétionnaire de l'article 13

Selon les termes de l'article 13, il est clair que lorsque les conditions d'application d'une exception sont établies, le non-retour n'est pas forcément ordonné : le tribunal saisi de la demande de retour a un pouvoir discrétionnaire.

Ce pouvoir discrétionnaire a été étudié très en détail par une toute récente décision de la juridiction suprême britannique, la Chambre des Lords, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Dans cette affaire, le juge Hale a affirmé qu'il convenait de rejeter toute mention d'exception lors de l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire en vertu de la Convention de La Haye,  dans la mesure où les circonstances dans lesquelles le retour pourrait être refusé sont elles-mêmes des exceptions au principe général du retour. Le caractère exceptionnel étant donc inhérent au mécanisme; il n'était ni utile ni désirable d'importer une exigence supplémentaire.

Dans l'exercice de leur pouvoir discrétionnaire, il convenait pour les juges de prendre en compte, outre l'intérêt des enfants en cause, plusieurs principes généraux, l'objectif de retour immédiat des enfants enlevés mais également la courtoisie internationale, le respect mutuel pour les procédures menées dans les États contractants et l'importance de la prévention des enlèvements. Une juridiction pouvait tenir compte des divers principes sous-tendant la Convention, des circonstances de l'affaire et d'éléments liés aux droits et au bien-être de l'enfant. Dans certains cas, les principes conventionnels étaient amenés à primer, dans d'autres cas non.

La nature discrétionnaire des exceptions se rencontre le plus fréquemment dans le contexte de l'article 13(2) (opposition d'un enfant mûr), mais il existe également des exemples de demandes de retour auxquelles il a été fait droit nonobstant l'établissement d'exceptions supplémentaires.


Consentement

Australie
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 267].


Acquiescement

Nouvelle-Zélande
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @472@].

Risque Grave

Nouvelle-Zélande
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @538@].

Il convient de noter que dans l'arrêt de la cour d'appel anglaise Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ UKe @880@] le juge Hale avait estimé qu'il était inconcevable d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant si un risque grave de danger était établi.

Acquiescement

On constate que la plupart des tribunaux considèrent que l'acquiescement se caractérise en premier lieu à partir de l'intention subjective du parent victime :

Australie
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @213@];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian PT 1767 of 2001 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @345@];

Autriche
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (Austrian Supreme Court) 1/4/2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT @981@].

Dans cette affaire la Cour suprême autrichienne, qui prenait position pour la première fois sur l'interprétation de la notion d'acquiescement, souligna que l'acquiescement à état de fait provisoire ne suffisait pas à faire jouer l'exception et que seul l'acquiescement à un changement durable de la résidence habituelle donnait lieu à une exception au retour au sens de l'article 13(1) a).

Belgique
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE @545@];

Canada
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 851];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

En l'espèce la Chambre des Lords britannique décida que l'acquiescement ne pouvait se déduire de remarques passagères et de lettres écrites par un parent qui avait récemment subi le traumatisme de voir ses enfants lui être enlevés par l'autre parent. 

Irlande
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

Israël
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @807@] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @533@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs @500@];

Afrique du Sud
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @499@];

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@].

De la même manière, on remarque une réticence des juges à constater un acquiescement lorsque le parent avait essayé d'abord de parvenir à un retour volontaire de l'enfant ou à une réconciliation. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @46@];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @179@ ];

Irlande
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @285@];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @84@];

Dans l'affaire australienne Townsend & Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @290@] des négociations d'une durée de 12 mois avaient été considérées comme établissant un acquiescement, mais la cour décida, dans le cadre de son pouvoir souverain d'appréciation, de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Hechos

Las menores, dos niñas, tenían casi 7 años y 2 años y medio de edad en el momento de la supuesta sustracción ilícita. Ambas eran de nacionalidad alemana y habían vivido en Alemania y Australia. Su madre era alemana y su padre había nacido en Nueva Zelanda. Los padres se casaron en 1991 en Alemania y tenían derechos de custodia conjuntos.

El 17 de junio de 2001 el padre se llevó a las menores a Nueva Zelanda para unas vacaciones con el consentimiento de la madre. Las menores debían regresar el 8 de agosto de 2001. Alrededor del 8 de julio la madre consintió en que las menores prolongaran su estadía y se fijó una nueva fecha de regreso para el 13 de septiembre.

En algún momento a fines de julio el padre le informó a la madre que deseaba quedarse en forma permanente en Nueva Zelanda. La madre al principio se mostró "hostil" y "disgustada". Más tarde le dijo al padre que podía retener a las menores en Nueva Zelanda y el 23 de agosto envió un facsímil en el que daba sus razones para tomar esta decisión. Sin embargo, en octubre la madre informó al padre que quería que las menores fueran restituidas a Alemania.

El 31 de octubre la madre presentó una solicitud de restitución en virtud del Convenio de La Haya.

Fallo

Retención ilícita y restitución ordenada. El consentimiento posterior por parte del progenitor solicitante se estableció en la medida exigida en el artículo 13(1)(a), no obstante el tribunal ejerció su discreción para ordenar la restitución de la menor. Ninguna de las otras excepciones había sido probada en la medida exigida en el marco del Convenio.

Comentario INCADAT

En el fallo se hizo referencia a un primer fallo del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés sobre aceptación posterior: Re A (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1992] 2 WLR 536; Re A and anor (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1992] 1 ALL ER 929 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 48]. Si el Tribunal hubiera conocido el fallo posterior de la Cámara de los Lores: Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72, [1997] 2 WLR 563, [1997] 2 All ER 225 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46], habría dudado menos en determinar que no había habido aceptación posterior por parte de la madre por el hecho de enviar su carta tras la retención.

Carácter limitado de las excepciones

En curso de elaboración.

Carácter discrecional del artículo 13

La redacción del artículo 13 deja en claro que cuando se encuentra configurada una de las excepciones previstas en el Convenio, el dictado de una orden de no restitución no es inevitable; por el contrario, el tribunal que conoce de la solicitud de restitución tiene la facultad discrecial para pronunciar o no una orden de restitución.

El estudio reciente más amplio del ejercicio de la discreción en cuanto a ordenar la restitución en casos de sustracción de menores ha surgido de la decisión de la jurisdicción suprema del Reino Unido, la Cámara de los Lores, en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

En ese caso, la Baronesa Hale afirmó que convenía no incluir mencion de circunstancias excepcionales en cuanto al ejercicio de discreción en la aplicación del Convenio de La Haya. Las circunstancias en las cuales se podría denegar una restitución eran en sí mismas excepciones a la regla general. No era necesario ni deseable importar una exigencia adicional al Convenio.

La manera en la cual se ejercería la discreción diferiría dependiendo de los hechos del caso; las consideraciones de política general —entre ellas no solo la pronta restitución de los menores sustraídos, sino también la cortesía entre los Estados contratantes, el respeto mutuo por los procesos judiciales y la disuasión para no cometer sustracciones— tendrían que ser ponderadas con respecto al interés del menor en cada caso. Un tribunal estaría facultado para tener en cuenta los diversos aspectos de la política del Convenio, junto con las circunstancias que le dieron al tribunal una discreción en primer lugar y las consideraciones más amplias de los derechos y el bienestar del menor. Algunas veces se le daría más peso a los objetivos del Convenio que a las otras consideraciones y otras veces no.

El carácter discrecional de las excepciones se ve más comúnmente en el contexto del artículo 13(2) (objeciones de un menor maduro), pero hay igualmente ejemplos de órdenes de restitución otorgadas a pesar de haberse configurado otras excepciones.

Consentimiento

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 995

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267]

Aceptación posterior

Nueva Zelanda
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ @472@].

Riesgo Grave

Nueva Zelanda
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ @538@]

Puede observarse que en la apelación inglesa Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ UKe @880@], la Baronesa Hale sostuvo que era inconcebible que se pudiera restituir a un menor cuando se establece la existencia de un riesgo grave.

Aceptación posterior

Se ha aceptado en forma generalizada que en lo que respecta a la excepción de aceptación posterior, en primera instancia, debe prestarse atención a las intenciones subjetivas del padre privado del menor. Véanse:

Australia
Commissioner, Western Australia Police v. Dormann, JP (1997) FLC 92-766 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 213];

Barry Eldon Matthews (Commissioner, Western Australia Police Service) v. Ziba Sabaghian, PT 1767 of 2001 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 345];

Austria
5Ob17/08y, Oberster Gerichtshof, (tribunal supremo de Austria) 1/4/2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT @981@]

Al considerar la cuestión por primera vez, el tribunal supremo de Austria resolvió que la aceptación posterior con respecto a un estado de situación temporario no sería suficiente a efectos del artículo 13(1) a), sino que, en el caso de un cambio permanente de residencia habitual, debía existir aceptación posterior.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles 6/3/2003, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 545];

Canadá
Ibrahim v. Girgis, 2008 ONCA 23, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 851];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46];

En este caso, la Cámara de los Lores sostuvo que no podía deducirse que había habido aceptación posterior por comentarios pasajeros o cartas escritas por un padre que recientemente había sufrido el trauma inherente a la sustracción de sus hijos.

Irlanda
K. v. K., 6 May 1998, transcript, Supreme Court of Ireland [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 285];

Israel
Dagan v. Dagan 53 P.D (3) 254 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 807]

Nueva Zelanda
P. v. P., 13 March 2002, Family Court at Greymouth (New Zealand), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 533];

Reino Unido - Escocia
M.M. v. A.M.R. or M. 2003 SCLR 71, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 500]

Sudáfrica
Smith v. Smith 2001 (3) SA 845 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 499];

Suiza
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

En concordancia con este enfoque, ha habido reticencia a pronunciarse en favor de la existencia de aceptación posterior cuando el padre solicitante ha pretendido en un principio obtener la restitución voluntaria del menor o lograr reconciliarse con el sustractor. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. and Others (Minors) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] AC 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 46];

P. v. P. (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1998] 2 FLR 835, [Referencia INCADAT:  HC/E/UKe 179] ;

Irlanda
R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 IR 416, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 285];

Estados Unidos de América
Wanninger v. Wanninger, 850 F. Supp. 78 (D. Mass. 1994), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 84];

En el caso australiano Townsend y Director-General, Department of Families, Youth and Community (1999) 24 Fam LR 495, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 290], se interpretó que la negociación durante 12 meses equivalía a aceptación posterior. Sin embargo, cabe destacar que, en ejercicio de su discrecionalidad, el tribunal decidió expedir una orden de restitución.

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, una reforma legislativa cambió la interpretacion posteriormente. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o simples deseos.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interés superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward planteó una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si es adecuado tener en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Inner House of the Court of Session, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto. Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Inner House of the Court of Session en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución. Véanse:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, incluso motivada, no satisfará los términos del artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, véase: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).