CASE

No full text available

Case Name

R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7

INCADAT reference

HC/E/IE 817

Court

Country

IRELAND

Name

Supreme Court

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Denham J., Mc Guinness J., Hardiman J., Fennelly J., McCracken J.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

IRELAND

Decision

Date

16 February 2006

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

13(1)(a) 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(a) 13(1)(b)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Hay v. O'Grady [1992] 1 I.R. 210; Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 F.L.R. 212; A.S. v. P.S. [1998] 2 I.R. 244; R.K. v. J.K. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [2000] 2 I.R. 416; Friedrich v Friedrich (1996) 78 F.3d 1060; M.S.H. v. L.H. (Child Abduction: Custody) [2000] 3 I.R. 390.

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

Consent
Classifying Consent
Establishing Consent
Consent and Alleged Deception
Prospective Consent

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Undertakings

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The children were aged 4 1/2 and 2 at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. They had lived all of their lives in the United States with their parents. In January 2005 they travelled to Ireland with their mother. The nature of this trip was the subject of dispute between the parents: it was the father's case that it was a very short vacation whilst the mother maintained that it was a permanent relocation.

The father petitioned for the return of the children. On 26 January 2006 the Irish High Court made a return order, subject to undertakings. The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed and return ordered; the retention was wrongful and none of the exceptions had been established to the standard required under the Convention.

INCADAT comment

Classifying Consent

The classification of consent has given rise to difficulty. Some courts have indeed considered that the issue of consent goes to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention and should therefore be considered within Article 3, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 312];

France
CA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/FR 897];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 54];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1014].

Although the issue had ostensibly been settled in English case law, that consent was to be considered under Art 13(1) a), neither member of the two judge panel of the Court of Appeal appeared entirely convinced of this position. 

Reference can equally be made to examples where trial courts have not considered the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but where consent, in terms of initially going along with a move, has been treated as relevant to wrongfulness, see:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 969];

Switzerland
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 425];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 186].

The case was not considered in terms of the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but given that the father initially went along with the relocation it was held that there would be neither a wrongful removal or retention.

The majority view is now though that consent should be considered in relation to Article 13(1) a), see:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 830];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267];

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591];

Ireland
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 287];

United Kingdom - Scotland
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 997];

For a discussion of the issues involved see Beaumont & McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, 1999 at p. 132 et seq.

Establishing Consent

Different standards have been applied when it comes to establishing the Article 13(1) a) exception based on consent.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In an early first instance decision it was held that ordinarily the clear and compelling evidence which was necessary would need to be in writing or at least evidenced by documentary material, see:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

This strict view has not been repeated in later first instance English cases, see:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 55].

In Re K. it was held that while consent must be real, positive and unequivocal, there could be circumstances in which a court could be satisfied that consent had been given, even though not in writing.  Moreover, there could also be cases where consent could be inferred from conduct.

Germany
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491].

Convincing evidence is required to establish consent.

Ireland
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 817].

The Re K. approach was specifically endorsed by the Irish Supreme Court.

The Netherlands
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NL 318].

Consent need not be for a permanent stay.  The only issue is that there must be consent and that it has been proved convincingly.

South Africa
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

Consent could be express or tacit.

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung ) (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 896];

The Swiss Supreme Court has held that with regard to consent and acquiescence, the left behind parent must clearly agree, explicitly or tacitly, to a durable change in the residence of the child.  To this end the burden is on the abducting parent to show factual evidence which would lead to such a belief being plausible.

United States of America
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 808].

There must be a subjective assessment of what the applicant parent was actually contemplating. Consideration must also be given to the nature and scope of the consent.

Consent and Alleged Deception

There are examples of cases where it has been argued that prima facie consent should be vitiated by alleged deception on the part of the abducting parent, see for example:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267].

The fact that a document consenting to the removal of the children was presented to the mother on a pretext did not necessarily lead to the conclusion that it was a trap.  The mother was found to have consented.  But the trial judge nevertheless exercised his discretion to make a return order.

Israel
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 940].

Allegation of deception rejected; the father's consent was found to be informed and since it had been relied upon by the mother, the father could not renege on his initial consent to the relocation.

Prospective Consent

There is authority that consent might validly be given to a future removal, see:

Canada
Decision of 4 September 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 333].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 993].

It was held that the happening of the event must be reasonably ascertainable and there must not have been a material change in the circumstances since the consent was given.

United Kingdom - Scotland
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 76].

For a criticism of the majority view in Zenel v. Haddow, see:

Case commentary 1993 SCLR 872 at 884, 885;

G. Maher, Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention, 1993 SLT 281;

P. Beaumont and P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 at pp. 129, 130.

Undertakings

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Faits

Les enfants étaient âgés de 4 ans 1/2 et 2 ans à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Ils avaient vécu toute leur vie avec leur parents. En janvier 2005, ils allèrent en Irlande avec leur mère. Le but exact de ce séjour est controversé. Selon le père, il s'agissait de courtes vacances, alors que la mère prétendait qu'il s'agissait d'un déménagement définitif.

Le père demanda le retour des enfants. Le 26 janvier 2006, la High Court irlandaise ordonna le retour, à la condition que des engagements soient pris. La mère forma un recours.

Dispositif

Recours rejeté et retour ordonné ; le non-retour était illicite et aucune des exceptions n'était applicable.

Commentaire INCADAT

Qualification du consentement

La question de savoir si le consentement relève de l'article 3 ou de l'article 13(1) a) a posé difficulté. Certaines juridictions considèrent que le consentement est un élément permettant d'apprécier l'illicéité du déplacement ou du non-retour, et l'apprécient donc dans le cadre de l'article 3. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @312@];

FranceCA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 897];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @54@];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1014].

Bien que la question eût été a priori réglée par la jurisprudence anglaise, selon laquelle le consentement relevait de l'art. 13(1) a), aucun des deux juges de la Cour d'appel siégeant en l'espèce n'est apparu convaincu par cette position.

On peut aussi évoquer des exemples où des tribunaux de première instance n'ont pas fait référence à la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a) mais où le consentement, en tant qu'acceptation initiale du déménagement, a été considéré comme un élément de l'illicéité, voir:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969], Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969];

Suisse
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 425]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 186].

L'affaire n'a pas été abordée sous l'angle de la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a), mais étant donné que le père avait initialement accepté le déménagement, il a été considéré qu'il n'y avait eu ni déplacement ni non-retour illicite.

La plupart des décisions révèlent toutefois que la question du consentement est généralement analysée dans le contexte de l'article 13(1) a), voir :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @830@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@] ;

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912 ;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@] ;

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @591@] ;

Irlande
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @287@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 997].

Pour une analyse des problèmes cités ci-dessus, voir.: P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 132 et seq.

Établissement du consentement

Des exigences différentes ont été appliquées en matière d'établissement d'une exception de l'article 13(1) a) pour consentement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans une décision de première instance ancienne, il fut considéré qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve claire et impérieuse et qu'en général cette preuve devait être écrite ou en tout cas soutenue par des éléments de preuve écrits. Voir :

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @37@].

Cette approche restrictive n'a pas été maintenue dans des décisions de première instance plus récentes au Royaume-Uni. Voir :

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @55@].

Dans Re K. il fut décidé que si le consentement devait être réel, positif and non équivoque, il y avait des situations dans lesquelles le juge pouvait se satisfaire de preuves non écrites du consentement, et qu'il se pouvait même que le consentement fût déduit du comportement.

Allemagne
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE @491@].

Il fut décidé qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve convaincante du consentement.

Irlande
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @817@].

La Cour suprême irlandaise repris expressément les termes de Re K.

Pays-Bas
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL @318@].

Le consentement peut ne pas porter sur un séjour permanent, pourvu que le consentement à un séjour au moins temporaire soit établi de manière convaincante.

Afrique du Sud
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @900@].

Le consentement pouvait être exprès ou tacite.

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@] ;

5P.380/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @895@];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @896@].

Le Tribunal fédéral suisse estima qu'il y avait consentement et acquiescement du parent victime si celui-ci avait accepté, expressément ou implicitement, un changement durable de la résidence de l'enfant. Il appartenait au parent ravisseur d'apporter des éléments de preuve factuels rendant plausible qu'il avait pu croire à ce consentement.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @808@].

Il convenait de rechercher ce que le parent victime avait en tête et également de prendre en compte la nature et l'étendue du consentement.

Consentement et allégation de dol

Certaines affaires illustrent l'idée que ce qui apparaît à première vue comme un consentement pourrait être vicié en raison du dol commis par le parent ravisseur. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@].

Le fait qu'un document faisant état de son consentement au déplacement des enfants ait été présenté à la mère sous un faux prétexte ne fut pas analysé comme représentant nécessairement une preuve de dol. Il fut conclu que la mère avait bien consenti au déplacement mais le juge décida dans le cadre de son pouvoir discrétionnaire d'ordonner néanmoins le retour.

Israël
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @940@].

Allégation de dol rejetée, le consentement du père était éclairé et puisque la mère y avait cru, le père ne pouvait le rétracter.

Consentement prospectif

Il a été considéré par la jurisprudence que le consentement pouvait validement s'entendre du consentement à un déplacement futur :

Canada
Décision du 4 septembre 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 333] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 993].

Dans cette affaire, le tribunal a décidé que l'accomplissement de l'évènement futur devait pouvoir être établi de manière raisonnable et qu'il ne devait pas y avoir eu de changement matériel des circonstances après que le consentement eût été donné.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 76].

Pour une critique de la position de la majorité des juges dans l'affaire Zenel v. Haddow, voir :

La note suivant le rapport de la décision dans SCLR 1993, p. 872 spec. 884 et 885;

G. Maher, « Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention », SLT, 1993, p. 281 ;

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 129 et 130.

Engagements

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.