CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Espiritu v. Bielza, [2007] O.J. No. 1587; 2007 ONCJ 175; 39 R.F.L. (6th) 218; 2007 CarswellOnt 2546

INCADAT reference

HC/E/CA 728

Court

Country

CANADA

Name

Ontario Court of Justice

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Spence (J.)

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

CANADA

Decision

Date

2 April 2007

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Return refused

HC article(s) Considered

1 3 4 5 13(1)(b) 14

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b) 14

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Astudillo (Pesantes) v. Bayas (Ponce), 1997 CanLII 11576, 70 A.C.W.S. (3d) 499; 10 O.F.L.R. 207; [1997] O.J. No. 1438; 28 O.T.C. 389; 1997 CarswellOnt 986; Chan v. Chow (2001), 152 B.C.A.C. 176, 2001 B.C.C.A. 276; Chavez v. Chavez (2004), 148 S.W. 3d 449 (Tex. Ct. App.); In re De La Pena (1999), 999 S.W. 2d 521 (Tex. Ct. App.); Jabbaz v. Mouammar, [2003] O.J. No. 1616; Rodriguez v. McFall (1983), 658 S.W. 2d 150 (Tex. S.C.); Texas Family Code, s. 153.001, s. 153.002, s. 153.005, s. 153.131; Thomson v. Thomson, [1994] 3 S.C.R. 551.

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Return
Place of Return
Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The parents of the child, a boy, were married in 1998 in the Philippines. After the marriage the father remained in the Philippines, where he was a life-long resident, and the mother moved to Texas, USA. At the time of her move the mother was one month pregnant. The child was born in 1999. The father wanted the mother and child to return to the Philippines, but the mother wanted to stay in Texas and asked the father to join her there. The parents remained separated and never resumed cohabitation.

The father had almost no contact with the child. The mother brought the child to the Philippines to visit the father. The father saw the child briefly during that visit but otherwise did not have contact with his son, despite the mother's efforts to facilitate contact. The mother obtained a divorce and order for sole custody in Texas, USA. On the mother's initiative, the custody order included provision for extensive access by the father. The mother committed suicide on 29 June 2006.

A maternal aunt was named legal guardian in the mother's will dated August 2001. A day prior to her suicide, however, the mother left a note stating she wished a a paternal aunt, who also lived in Texas, USA, to retain "full custody" of the child. The child went to live with the paternal aunt on the day of the mother's death. On 24 July 2006 the maternal aunt applied for custody of the child.

On 26 July 2006  the paternal aunt also applied for custody. On the same day the maternal and the paternal aunts agreed to a temporary custody order whereby the child would spend alternating weeks with each pending final resolution of the custody proceedings. A lawyer was appointed for the child.

On 8 November 2006 the paternal aunt abandoned her claim for custody. Full custody, including the exclusive right to determine the child's place of residence, was granted to the maternal aunt, with the consent of the child's lawyer. The father was not served with this order.

On 8 December 2006 the father applied to have the maternal aunt's custody order declared void. On 23 December 2006 the maternal aunt returned home to Ontario, Canada with the child, without giving notice to the father or the court.  The father having obtained a visa to visit the US on 21 December 2006, arrived in Texas on 31 December 2006. On 4 January 2007 the order granting the aunt sole custody over the child was declared void by a Texas Court. The father petitioned for the return of the child to Texas.

Ruling

Application dismissed the removal was not deemed to have been in breach of actually exercised rights of custody.

INCADAT comment

Place of Return

Article 12 of the Convention does not prescribe the place to which the child should be returned. The drafters wished for the provision to be left sufficiently wide to allow for a return to a State other than that of the child's habitual residence. However, the Preamble makes clear that the general intention is that a return should be to the latter State. Of course a return to the State of habitual residence does not of itself require the child to be placed into the care of the applicant parent or indeed of a State agency; very often the child will remain in the care of the abducting parent pending the determination of the substantive custody case. Furthermore a return need not mean a return to the particular place in the State where the child previously lived.

Courts have taken advantage of the flexibility in the drafting of Article 12 when dealing with return applications, see:

Australia
Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 113].

The Full Court suggested that mother and children return to a different part of New Zealand from that where they previously lived in order to avoid danger at the hands of the applicant father.

Israel
G. v. B., 25 April 2007, Court for Family Matters, Beersheva [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 910].

Child ordered to be returned to Belgium, the country where he was to live, although it was not his State of habitual residence prior to the removal.

Where a court considered that the applicant father had no intention of actually remaining in the State of habitual residence with the child, but was actually seeking to bring about a relocation to a non-Convention State, it decided not to make a return order.

Canada
Espiritu v. Bielza, [2007] O.J. No. 1587; 2007 ONCJ 175; 39 R.F.L. (6th) 218; 2007 CarswellOnt 2546, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 728].

For discussion of the drafting of Article 12 see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford OUP, 1999.

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Faits

Les parents de l'enfant, un garçon, se sont mariés en 1998 dans les Philippines. Après le mariage, le père est resté aux Philippines, où il avait toujours résidé, tandis que la mère a déménagé au Texas, États Unis, alors qu'elle était enceinte d'un mois. L'enfant est né en 1999. Le père souhaitait que la mère et l'enfant retournent aux Philippines, mais la mère préférait rester au Texas et elle a demandé au père de la rejoindre là-bas. Les parents sont restés séparés et n'ont jamais repris la vie commune.

Le père n'a eu pour ainsi dire aucun contact avec l'enfant. La mère a amené celui-ci aux Philippines pour rendre visite au père. Le père a vu brièvement son fils au cours de cette visite, mais il n'a eu aucun contact par ailleurs avec lui, malgré les efforts déployés par la mère pour faciliter les contacts. La mère a obtenu le divorce et la garde exclusive au Texas, États Unis. À la demande de la mère, l'ordonnance de garde comportait une clause prévoyant de larges droits de visite en faveur du père. La mère s'est suicidée le 29 juin 2006.

Une tante maternelle a été nommée tutrice légale dans le testament de la mère en date d'août 2001. Cependant, la veille de son suicide, la mère avait laissé une note dans laquelle elle exprimait le désir qu' une tante paternelle, qui habitait également au Texas, ait la « garde entière » de l'enfant. L'enfant est allé vivre avec la tante paternelle le jour du décès de sa mère.

Le 24 juillet 2006, la tante maternelle a présenté une demande visant à obtenir la garde de l'enfant. Le 26 juillet 2006, la tante paternelle a également demandé la garde. Le même jour, la tante maternelle et la tante paternelle ont convenu d'une ordonnance de garde temporaire selon laquelle l'enfant passerait une semaine à tour de rôle chez la tante et chez tante paternelle jusqu'au règlement définitif de la procédure de garde. Un avocat a été désigné pour représenter l'enfant.

Le 8 novembre 2006, la tante paternelle a abandonné sa demande visant à obtenir la garde. La garde entière, y compris le droit exclusif de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, a été accordée à la tante maternelle, avec le consentement de l'avocat de l'enfant. Le père n'a pas reçu signification de cette ordonnance.

Le 8 décembre 2006, le père a présenté une demande visant à faire annuler l'ordonnance de garde rendue en faveur de la tante maternelle.  Cette requête a été signifiée à la tante.

Le 23 décembre 2006, la tante maternelle est retournée chez elle, en Ontario (Canada), avec l'enfant, sans aviser le père ou le tribunal. Après avoir obtenu un visa de séjour aux États Unis le 21 décembre 2006, le père est arrivé au Texas le 31 décembre 2006. Le 4 janvier 2007, un tribunal du Texas a annulé l'ordonnance accordant la garde exclusive de l'enfant à la tante. Le père a demandé le retour de l'enfant au Texas en application de la Convention de La Haye.

Dispositif

Demande rejeteé. Le déplacement d'enfant n'était pas considéré en violation d'un droit de garde exercé.

Commentaire INCADAT

Lieu de retour

L'article 12 de la Convention ne précise pas le lieu vers lequel l'enfant doit être renvoyé. Les auteurs de la Convention souhaitaient que cette disposition conserve suffisamment de souplesse afin de permettre un retour dans un État autre que l'État de résidence habituelle. Toutefois le préambule spécifie que l'intention était en général de renvoyer les enfants dans leur État de résidence habituelle. Il est entendu que le retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle n'implique pas à lui seul que l'enfant soit placé sous les soins du parent demandeur ou d'un organisme public. Très souvent l'enfant reste sous la garde du parent ravisseur en attendant que la question concernant la garde soit tranchée au fond. Par ailleurs, un retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle ne signifie pas nécessairement un retour à l'endroit précis où l'enfant vivait avant le déplacement.

Les tribunaux ont parfois bien usé de la souplesse de l'article 12 dans le cadre d'ordonnances de retour. Voir :

Australie
Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 113]

La cour suggéra que la mère et les enfants retournent en Nouvelle-Zélande mais dans une région différente de leur région d'origine afin d'éviter tout danger lié à la violence du père. 

Israël
G. v. B., 25 April 2007, Court for Family Matters, Beersheva, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 910]

Enfant renvoyé en Belgique alors qu'il ne s'agissait pas de l'État de sa résidence habituelle immédiatement avant le déplacement.

Une cour a considéré que le père demandeur n'avait pas l'intention de rester dans l'État de résidence habituelle avec l'enfant, mais préparait en fait leur déménagement dans un État non partie à la Convention. Par conséquent la cour a décidé de ne pas ordonner le retour.

Canada
Espiritu v. Bielza, [2007] O.J. No. 1587; 2007 ONCJ 175; 39 R.F.L. (6th) 218; 2007 CarswellOnt 2546, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 728].

Pour un exposé de la formulation de l'article 12 par les auteurs de la Convention, voir :

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999.

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.