CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313

INCADAT reference

HC/E/USf 481

Court

Country

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Name

United States District Court for the District of Minnesota

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Tunheim D.J.

States involved

Requesting State

ISRAEL

Requested State

UNITED STATES - FEDERAL JURISDICTION

Decision

Date

9 May 2002

Status

Upheld on appeal

Grounds

-

Order

Application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Rydder v. Rydder, 49 F.3d 369, 372 (8th Cir. 1995); Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436, 439 (E.D. Mich. 1996); Miller v. Miller, 240 F.3d 392, 398 (4th Cir. 2001); Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217, 220 n.4 (3d Cir. 1995); Cohen v. Cohen, 158 Misc. 2d 1018, 602 N.Y.S.2d 994, 998-99 (Sup. Ct. 1993); In re Bates, No. CA122.89 at 9-10, High Court of Justice, Fam. Div'n Ct. Royal Court of Justice, United Kingdom (1989); Levesque v. Levesque, 816 F. Supp. 662, 665 (D. Kan. 1993); Ponath v. Ponath, 829 F. Supp. 363 (D. Utah 1993); Nunez-Escudero v. Tice-Menley, 58 F.3d at 379; Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp. 2d. 1045, 1056 (E.D. Wash. 2001); Blondin v. Dubois, 238 F.3d 153, 163-68 (2d Cir. 2001).

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence
Can a Child be left without a Habitual Residence?
Can a Child have more than one Habitual Residence?
Relocations
Open-Ended Moves
Time Limited Moves

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Risks associated with the child's State of habitual residence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The children were 8 and 5 at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. The parents were married and the family had lived together in the United States until August 1999 when they moved to Israel. The family stayed there for 10 months when the mother took the children back to the United States for a 2 month vacation. However in August 2000 the mother informed the father that she would not be returning and she commenced divorce and custody proceedings in a Minnesota state court.

The father immediately contacted the United States Central Authority, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and on 5 October his return application was filed in the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, a federal court.

On 10 October the father filed a motion in the Minnesota state court seeking the dismissal or a stay of the custody proceedings. This was refused. On 17 October the state court granted the mother temporary custody and found that the move to Israel had only been a temporary absence and that Minnesota was the children's home state.

The mother then issued an application in the federal court to have the father's return petition dismissed. She argued that there were on-going state court proceedings, the state had a significant interest in matters of child custody, and the father had the opportunity to present the Hague issue in the state court.

On 7 November the federal District Court granted the mother's motion and dismissed the return petition on the basis that the father had failed to show that the state courts would afford him adequate opportunity to litigate his petition under the Hague Convention.

The father appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. The appeal was allowed and the case was remitted to the District Court (federal jurisdiction) for a ruling to be made on the merits of the return application, see: Silverman v. Silverman, 267 F.3d 788 (8th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 412].

The father had also brought proceedings in a rabbinical court in Israel. The latter ruled on 16 November 2000 that the children were habitually resident in Israel and that the retention of the children was wrongful. This decision was upheld by a further decision on 30 October 2001.

Ruling

Application dismissed; the children were not habitually resident in Israel at the time of the removal.

INCADAT comment

The judgment of the District Court was upheld on appeal by a 2:1 verdict, see: Silverman v. Silverman 312 F.3d 914; 2002 U.S. App. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 483]. The issue of grave risk of harm was not addressed by the majority, but it was strongly rejected by the dissenting judge.

A majority of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit sitting en banc (8 : 4) allowed an appeal of the District Court's order and ruled that the children should be returned, see: Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 530].

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Can a Child be left without a Habitual Residence?

In early Convention case law there was a clear reluctance on the part of appellate courts to find that a child did not have a habitual residence.  This was because of the concern that such a conclusion would render the instrument inoperable, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40];

Australia
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 104].

However, in more recent years there has been a recognition that situations do exist where it is not possible to regard a child as being habitually resident anywhere:

Australia
D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 870].

In this case the majority accepted that their decision could be said to deny the child of the benefit of the Convention. However, the majority argued that the interests of children generally could be adversely affected if courts were too willing to find that a parent who had attempted a reconciliation in a foreign country, was to be found, together with the child, to have become "habitually resident" in that foreign country.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 470];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 194];

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 351];

New Zealand
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 816];

United States of America
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 529];

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 797].

Can a Child have more than one Habitual Residence?

Academic commentators have long held that if the factual nature of the connecting factor is to be respected then situations may arise where an individual is habitually resident in more than one place at a particular time, see in particular:

Clive E. M. ‘The Concept of Habitual Residence' Juridical Review (1997), p. 137.

However, the Court of Appeal in England has accepted in the context of divorce jurisdiction that it is possible for an adult to be habitually resident in two places simultaneously, see:

Ikimi v. Ikimi [2001] EWCA Civ 873, [2002] Fam 72.

Courts in Convention proceedings have though held to the view that a child can only have one habitual residence, see for example:

Canada
SS-C c GC, Cour supérieure (Montréal), 15 août 2003, n° 500-04-033270-035, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 916];

Wilson v. Huntley (2005) A.C.W.S.J. 7084; 138 A.C.W.S. (3d) 1107 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 800];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1995] 2 FLR 992, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 45].

In this case where the children's lives alternated between Greece and England the court held that their habitual residence also alternated.  The court ruled out their having concurrent habitual residences in both Greece and England.

United Kingdom - Northern Ireland
Re C.L. (A Minor); J.S. v. C.L., transcript, 25 August 1998, High Court of Northern Ireland, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKn 390];

United States of America
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, (6th Cir. 1993), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 142].

Relocations

Where there is clear evidence of an intention to commence a new life in another State then the existing habitual residence will be lost and a new one acquired.

In common law jurisdictions it is accepted that acquisition may be able to occur within a short period of time, see:

Canada
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 576];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40].

In civil law jurisdictions it has been held that a new habitual residence may be acquired immediately, see:

Switzerland
Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) Décision du 15 novembre 2005, 5P.367/2005 /ast, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/CH 841].

Conditional Relocations 

Where parental agreement as regards relocation is conditional on a future event, should an existing habitual residence be lost immediately upon leaving that country? 

Australia
The Full Court of the Family Court of Australia answered this question in the negative and further held that loss may not even follow from the fulfilment of the condition if the parent who aspires to relocate does not clearly commit to the relocation at that time, see:

Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 995].

However, this ruling was overturned on appeal by the High Court of Australia, which held that an existing habitual residence would be lost if the purpose had a sufficient degree of continuity to be described as settled.  There did not need to be a settled intention to take up ‘long term' residence:

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 1012].

Open-Ended Moves

Where a move is open ended, or potentially open ended, the habitual residence at the time of the move may also be lost and a new one acquired relatively quickly, see:

United Kingdom - England and Wales (Non-Convention case)
Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 875];

New Zealand
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 413];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 71];

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 74];

United States of America
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 879].

Time Limited Moves

Where a move abroad is time limited, even if it is for an extended period of time, there has been acceptance in certain Contracting States that the existing habitual residence can be maintained throughout, see:

Denmark
Ø.L.K., 5. April 2002, 16. afdeling, B-409-02 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DK 520];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H. (Abduction: Habitual Residence: Consent) [2000] 2 FLR 294; [2000] 3 FCR 412 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 478];

United States of America
Morris v. Morris, 55 F. Supp. 2d 1156 (D. Colo., Aug. 30, 1999) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 306];

Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 301].

However, where a move was to endure for two years the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit found that a change of habitual residence occurred shortly after the move, see:

Whiting v. Krassner 391 F.3d 540 (3rd Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 778].

In an English first instance decision it was held that a child had acquired a habitual residence in Germany after five months even though the family had only moved there for a six month secondment, see:

Re R. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [2003] EWHC 1968 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 580].

The Court of Appeal of China (Hong Kong SAR) found that a 21 month move led to a change in habitual residence:

B.L.W. v. B.W.L. [2007] 2 HKLRD 193, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 975].

Risks associated with the child's State of habitual residence

Article 13(1)(b) has on occasion been raised not with regard to a specific risk directed at the individual child, but as the result of general circumstances prevailing in the State of habitual residence.

In the well-known US appellate case of Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 82], it was held, inter alia, that a grave risk could only exist when the return would put the child in imminent danger prior to the resolution of a custody dispute, e.g. by returning the child to a war zone or famine area.

This argument has been raised most frequently with regard to Israel.

Return to Israel

Courts have been divided over whether a return to Israel would expose a child to a grave risk of harm, but a clear majority has taken the view that it would not, see:

Argentina
A. v. A. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 487]

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 995]

Belgium
No 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/BE 547]

Canada
Docket No 1 F 3709/00; C., 4 December 2001, Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Court File No 01-FA-10575

Denmark
V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DK 519]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

France
CA Aix en Provence, 8 octobre 2002, No de RG 02/14917 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 509]

Germany
1 F 3709/00, Familiengericht Zweibrücken, 25 January 2001 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 392]

United States of America
Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436 (E.D. Mich. 1996) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 133]

However, the argument has been upheld on several occasions:

Australia
Janine Claire Genish-Grant and Director-General Department of Community Services [2002] FamCA 346 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 458]

United States of America
Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 481] (see however: Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 530])  

Return to Zimbabwe

The highest jurisdiction in the United Kingdom, the House of Lords, rejected in 2008 a submission that the moral and political climate in Zimbabwe was such that any child would be at grave risk of psychological harm, or should not be expected to tolerate having to live there.

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55 [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Return to Mexico

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 1129]

The mother mentioned the pollution of Mexico City, the insecurity due to crime in the Mexico City metropolis, and earthquake risks. She did not, however, show how these risks affected the children personally and directly. She had not mentioned those factors as justification for her decision to move to France, in a document sent to the father in 2010, but had referred to financial and family difficulties. In addition, the Court of Appeal noted that these factors had not deterred her from living in Mexico from 1998 to 2010 and raising two children there. It further noted that the mother had not seen fit to apply to the Mexican authorities for permission to move to France with the children, without explaining the reasons which in her view could jeopardise her right to a fair trial in Mexico.

The Court of Appeal made it clear that it did not affirm that the pleas raised by the mother were groundless. They might be used in connection with the issue of custody, but were not a sufficient proof of a grave risk.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Faits

Les enfants étaient âgés de 8 et 5 ans à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Les parents étaient mariés et la famille avait vécu aux Etats-Unis jusqu'en 1999, date à laquelle ils s'installèrent en Israël. Après 10 mois dans cet Etat, la mère emmena les enfants aux Etats-Unis pour y passer 2 mois de vacances. Toutefois, en août 2000, la mère informa le père de son intention de ne pas rentrer en Israël et saisit une juridiction étatique du Minnesota d'une demande tendant à l'obtention du divorce et de la garde.

Le père prit immédiatement contact avec l'autorité centrale des Etats-Unis, le Centre national pour les enfants disparus et exploités et, le 5 octobre, une juridiction fédérale du district du Minnesota fut saisie d'une demande de retour.

Le 10 octobre, le père forma une demande tendant à voir rejeter la demande de garde ou à en suspendre la procédure. Il fut débouté. Le 17 Octobre, la juridiction étatique accorda la garde provisoire à la mère et estima que l'installation en Israël s'interprétait en une absence temporaire, en sorte que le Minnesota était bien l'état de résidence habituelle des enfants.

La mère demanda alors que la demande de retour du père soit déboutée par la juridiction fédérale. Elle invoqua l'existence d'une instance pendante au niveau étatique, le fait que l'Etat avait un intérêt en matière de garde des enfants et que le père pouvait demander l'application de la Convention de La Haye aux juridictions étatiques.

Le 7 novembre, la cour fédérale accueillit la demande de la mère et rejeta celle du père au motif que celui-ci n'avait pas démontré que les juridictions étatiques ne lui ouvriraient pas la possibilité d'invoquer utilement la Convention de La Haye.

Le père interjeta appel devant la cour d'appel fédéral pour le 8ème circuit. Son recours fut accueilli et l'affaire renvoyée devant la cour de district (juridiction fédérale) afin qu'il soit statué sur le fond de la demande. Voy. Silverman v. Silverman, 267 F.3d 788 (8th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USf 412].

Le père avait également entamé une procédure devant un tribunal rabbinique israélien, lequel décida le 16 novembre 2000 que les enfants avaient leur résidence habituelle en Israël et que le non-retour des enfants était illicite. Cette décision fut confirmée par une autre décision en date du 30 octobre 2001.

Dispositif

Demande rejetée ; les enfants n'avaient pas leur résidence habituelle en Israël a la date du non-retour.

Commentaire INCADAT

Le jugement de la cour de district fut confirmé en appel par 2 voix contre une ; voy.: Silverman v. Silverman 312 F.3d 914; 2002 U.S. App. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 483]. La question du risque grave ne fut pas abordée par la majorité mais fut rejetée avec véhémence par le juge minoritaire.

La majorité de la cour d'appel des Etats-Unis pour le 8è ressort a par 8 voix contre 4, déclaré l'appel recevable et a ordonné le retour des enfants : Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT HC/E/US 530].

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Un enfant peut-il se trouver sans résidence habituelle?

Dans la jurisprudence conventionnelle ancienne, les cours se sont montrées peu enclines à admettre qu'un enfant puisse se trouver sans résidence habituelle, notamment en raison du fait qu'une telle conclusion rendait inapplicable la Convention, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40];

Australie
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 104].

Toutefois, plus récemment on constate que les cours reconnaissent qu'il y a des situations dans lesquelles il est impossible d'admettre que l'enfant a une résidence habituelle quelque part.

D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 870].

Dans cette affaire, la majorité des juges a estimé que certes leur conclusion empêchait l'application de la Convention mais a souligné que l'intérêt des enfants pouvait pâtir d'une trop grande propension des tribunaux à admettre que le parent ayant tenté de se réconcilier avec l'autre parent en vivant avec lui à l'étranger afin de donner à l'enfant une famille biparentale doit, avec l'enfant, avoir acquis une résidence habituelle dans cet État.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 470] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 194] ;

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 351] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 816] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 529] ;

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 797].

Un enfant peut-il avoir plusieurs résidences habituelles?

Les commentateurs ont longtemps estimé que la nature factuelle du facteur de rattachement implique que dans certaines situations une personne puisse avoir plusieurs résidences habituelles à un moment donné.

Voir en particulier :

E. M. Clive, « The Concept of Habitual Residence », Juridical Review (1997), p. 137.

La cour d'appel anglaise a estimé dans le contexte de la compétence internationale en matière de divorce qu'un adulte pouvait avoir plusieurs résidences habituelles en même temps. Voir :

Ikimi v. Ikimi [2001] EWCA Civ 873, [2002] Fam 72.

Toutefois les tribunaux saisis de demandes en application de la Convention ont estimé qu'un enfant ne peut avoir qu'une seule résidence habituelle à un moment donné. Voir par exemple :

Canada

S.S.-C. c. G.C., Cour supérieure (Montréal), 15 août 2003, n° 500-04-033270-035, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/CA 916] ;

Wilson v. Huntley (2005) A.C.W.S.J. 7084; 138 A.C.W.S. (3d) 1107 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 800] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re v. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1995] 2 FLR 992, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 45].

En l'espèce, les enfants passaient une partie de l'année en Grèce et l'autre en Angleterre. La cour refusa de considérer qu'ils avaient à la fois leur résidence habituelle en Grèce et en Angleterre.

Royaume-Uni - Ireland du Nord

Re C.L. (A Minor); J.S. v. C.L., transcript, 25 August 1998, High Court of Northern Ireland, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKn 390].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, (6th Cir. 1993), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142].

Déménagement ou Installation à l'étranger

Lorsqu'une intention de s'installer à l'étranger pour y commencer un nouveau chapitre de sa vie est établie, la résidence habituelle préexistante va être perdue et une nouvelle résidence habituelle pourra rapidement être acquise.

Dans les pays de common law, il est admis que cette acquisition peut survenir rapidement, voir :

Canada
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 576];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [1992] Fam Law 195 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40]

Dans les pays de droit civil, il a été admis qu'une résidence habituelle peut être acquise immédiatement, voir:
 
Suisse
5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Déménagements soumis à une condition future

Si l'accord des parents concernant le déménagement est soumis à une condition future, la résidence habituelle qui existait avant le déménagement est-elle perdue immédiatement lors du déménagement ?

Australie

Le tribunal familial australien (the Family Court of Australia) siégeant en séance plénière a répondu par la négative à cette question et a également déclaré que la perte de la résidence habituelle pouvait même ne pas découler de la réalisation de la condition en question, si à ce moment-là le parent désirant déménager ne s'engage pas clairement à déménager :

Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995].

Cependant, cette décision a été renversée en appel par la Haute Cour d'Australie, qui a considéré qu'une résidence habituelle existante pouvait être perdue si la volonté de déménager présentait un degré suffisant de continuité pour être décrite comme ferme. Il n'était donc pas nécessaire d'avoir une ferme intention d'établir sa résidence sur le « long terme ».

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1012].

Installation à l'étranger pour une durée illimitée

Lorsque la durée de l'installation à l'étranger est illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée, il est également possible de perdre une résidence habituelle antérieure et d'en acquérir une nouvelle relativement rapidement. Voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles (cas ne relevant pas de la Convention)
Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 875] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 413] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 71] ;

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 74] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Installation à l'étranger pour une durée limitée

Lorsque la durée d'un séjour à l'étranger est d'emblée limitée, même si le séjour doit être relativement long, certains États contractants ont considéré que la résidence habituelle était maintenue dans l'État d'origine. Voir :

Danemark
Ø.L.K., 5. April 2002, 16. afdeling, B-409-02 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DK 520];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H. (Abduction: Habitual Residence: Consent) [2000] 2 FLR 294; [2000] 3 FCR 412 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 478];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Morris v. Morris, 55 F. Supp. 2d 1156 (D. Colo., Aug. 30, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 306];

Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301].

Toutefois, la Cour fédérale d'appel du troisième ressort estima qu'une résidence habituelle nouvelle avait pu être acquise assez rapidement dans une situation où le séjour à l'étranger devait durer 2 ans. Voir :

Whiting v. Krassner 391 F.3d 540 (3rd Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 778].

En Angleterre, une décision de première instance a considéré qu'un enfant avait pu acquérir une résidence habituelle en Allemagne après un séjour de 5 mois dans ce pays alors même que la famille y était établie pour un contrat de 6 mois. Voir:

Re R. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [2003] EWHC 1968 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 580].

La Cour d'appel de Chine (RAS Hong-Kong) a considéré qu'un déménagement à l'étranger pour 21 mois conduisait à un changement de résidence habituelle. Voir:

B.L.W. v. B.W.L. [2007] 2 HKLRD 193, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 975].

Risques inhérents à l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant

Une exception de l'article 13(1)(b) a parfois été invoquée mettant en cause non pas un risque individuel pour l'enfant mais résultant des conditions de vie dans l'État de la résidence habituelle.

Dans l'arrêt d'appel fameux rendu aux États-Unis d'Amérique dans Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 82], la Cour constata entre autres qu'un risque grave ne pouvait être pris en compte que lorsque le retour est de nature à exposer l'enfant à un danger immédiat pouvant se matérialiser avant la résolution de la question de la garde, par exemple dans le cas où l'enfant est renvoyé dans une zone de guerre ou de famine.

La question s'est notamment posée au regard d'un retour en Israël.

Retour en Israël

La question de savoir si le retour d'enfants en Israël est de nature à les exposer à un risque grave de danger a divisé les tribunaux appelés à se prononcer sur ce point. Une majorité de juridictions a considéré que ce n'était pas le cas. Voir :

Argentine
A. v. A [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 487]

Australie
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995]

Belgique
N° 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 17/4/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 547]

Canada
Docket No 1 F 3709/00; C., 4 décembre 2001, Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Court File No 01-FA-10575

Danemark
V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01, Vestre Landsret; High Court, Western Division [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DK 519]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 469]

France
CA Aix en Provence, 8 octobre 2002, No de RG 02/14917 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 509]

Allemagne
1 F 3709/00, Familiengericht Zweibrücken (Family Court), 25 January 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 392]

États-Unis d'Amérique
Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436 (E.D. Mich. 1996) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 133]

Toutefois, l'argument a été accueilli dans certaines affaires :

Australie
Janine Claire Genish-Grant and Director-General Department of Community Services [2002] FamCA 346 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 458]

États-Unis d'Amérique
Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 481] (voir néanmoins Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 530]

Retour au Zimbabwe

La Chambre des Lords britannique, instance suprême du Royaume-Uni a rejeté l'argument selon lequel le climat politique et moral était tel au Zimbabwe que le retour d'enfants dans ce pays serait de nature à les exposer à un risque grave de danger psychologique ou à une situation intolérable.

Re M. (Abduction: Zimbabwe) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Retour au Mexique

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 1129]

La mère citait la pollution existant à Mexico, l'insécurité générée par la délinquance dans la métropole de Mexico ainsi que les risques sismiques. Toutefois elle ne montrait pas en quoi ces risques touchaient personnellement et directement les enfants. Elle n'avait pas mentionné ces facteurs pour justifier son choix de s'établir en France dans un document adressé au père en 2010, mais avait fait état de difficultés financières et familiales. En outre, la Cour nota que ces facteurs ne l'avaient pas dissuadé de vivre à Mexico de 1998 à 2010 et d'y avoir élevé deux enfants. Elle releva encore que la mère n'avait pas cru opportun de demander l'autorisation aux autorités mexicaines de s'établir en France avec les enfants, sans expliquer les raisons qui, selon elle, pourraient compromettre son droit à un procès équitable au Mexique.

La Cour clarifia qu'elle n'affirmait pas que les éléments soulevés par la mère étaient dénués de fondement. Ils pourraient être éventuellement utilisés dans le cadre de la question de la garde, mais ne suffisaient pas à établir l'existence d'un risque grave de danger.

(Auteur du résumé : Peter McEleavy, Avril 2013)

Hechos

Los menores tenían ocho y cinco años de edad a la fecha de la supuesta retención ilícita. Los padres estaban casados y la familia había vivido unida en los Estados Unidos hasta agosto de 1999 cuando se mudaron a Israel. La familia permaneció allí durante 10 meses hasta que la madre se llevó a los niños de regreso a Estados Unidos para unas vacaciones de dos meses. Sin embargo, en agosto de 2000 la madre le informó al padre que no regresaría e inició el juicio de divorcio y de custodia en el tribunal estatal de Minnesota.

El padre inmediatamente contactó a la Autoridad Central de los Estados Unidos, al National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (Centro Nacional de Menores Desaparecidos y Explotados), y el 5 de octubre presentó una solicitud de restitución ante el United States District Court for the District of Minnesota (Tribunal de Distrito de los Estados Unidos para el Distrito de Minnesota), un tribunal federal.

El 10 de octubre el padre presentó una moción en el tribunal estatal de Minnesota procurando la desestimación o la suspensión del proceso de custodia, la cual fue denegada. El 17 de octubre el tribunal estatal otorgó a la madre la custodia provisional y determinó que el traslado a Israel había sido simplemente una ausencia temporaria y que Minnesota era el estado donde lo menores tenían su hogar.

La madre luego presentó una solicitud ante el tribunal federal para que desestimara la petición de restitución del padre. Argumentó que existían procesos que estaban en curso ante el tribunal estadual, que el estado tenía importante interés en las cuestiones de custodia de menores, y que el padre tenía la oportunidad de presentar la cuestión de la Haya ante el tribunal estatal.

El 7 de noviembre el Federal District Court (Tribunal de Distrito Federal) concedió la moción presentada por la madre y desestimó la solicitud de restitución sobre la base de que el padre no logró demostrar que los tribunales estatales podrían proporcionarle la oportunidad adecuada para presentar su solicitud ante el Convenio de la Haya.

El padre apeló ante el United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (Tribunal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos para el Circuito Octavo). La apelación fue concedida y el caso fue remitido al Tribunal de Distrito (jurisdicción federal) para que la decisión sea tomada sobre los méritos de la solicitud de restitución, véase: Silverman v. Silverman, 267 F.3d 788 (8th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 412].

El padre también inició un proceso en un Tribunal de Rabinos de Israel (Rabbinical Court in Israel). Dicho tribunal estableció el 16 de noviembre de 2000 que los niños tenían su residencia habitual en Israel y que la retención de los menores era ilícita. Esta decisión fue confirmada por una decisión posterior emitida el 30 de octubre de 2001.

Fallo

Solicitud desestimada; los menores no tenían su residencia habitual en Israel al momento del traslado.

Comentario INCADAT

La resolución del Tribunal de Distrito fue confirmada en apelación por un fallo 2:1, véase: Silverman v. Silverman 312 F.3d 914; 2002 U.S. App. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 483]. El asunto del grave riesgo de daño no fue citado por la mayoría, pero fue fuertemente rechazado por el juez en disidencia.

Una mayoría del United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (Tribunal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos para el Circuito Octavo) sesionando en pleno (8:4) concedió la apelación de la decisión del Tribunal de Distrito y resolvió la restitución de los menores, véase: Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 530].

Residencia habitual

La interpretación del concepto central de residencia habitual (Preámbulo, art. 3, art. 4) ha demostrado ser cada vez más problemática en años recientes con interpretaciones divergentes que surgen de distintos Estados contratantes. No hay uniformidad respecto de si al momento de determinar la residencia habitual el énfasis debe estar sobre el niño exclusivamente, prestando atención a las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor, o si debe estar primordialmente en las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor. Al menos en parte como resultado, la residencia habitual puede parecer constituir un factor de conexión muy flexible en algunos Estados contratantes y mucho más rígido y reflejo de la residencia a largo plazo en otros.

La valoración de la interpretación de residencia habitual se torna aún más complicada por el hecho de que los casos que se concentran en el concepto pueden involucrar situaciones fácticas muy diversas. A modo de ejemplo, la residencia habitual puede tener que considerarse como consecuencia de una mudanza permanente, o una mudanza más tentativa, aunque tenga una duración indefinida o potencialmente indefinida, o la mudanza pueda ser, de hecho, por un plazo de tiempo definido.

Tendencias generales:

La jurisprudencia de los tribunales federales de apelación de los Estados Unidos de América puede tomarse como ejemplo de la amplia gama de interpretaciones existentes en lo que respecta a la residencia habitual.

Enfoque centrado en el menor

El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 6º Circuito ha apoyado firmemente el enfoque centrado en el menor en la determinación de la residencia habitual.

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F. 2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/Ee/USF 142];

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 935].

Veáse también:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 221].

Enfoque combinado: conexión del menor / intención de los padres

Los Tribunales Federales de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América de los 3º y 8º  Circuitos han adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor pero que igualmente tiene en cuenta las intenciones compartidas de los padres.

El fallo clave es el del caso: Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 83].

Veánse también:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

En este último asunto se estableció una distinción entre las situaciones que involucran a niños muy pequeños, en las cuales se atribuye especial importancia a las intenciones de los padres (véase por ejemplo: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 808]) y aquellas que involucran a niños más mayores, donde el impacto de las intenciones de los padres ya es más limitado.

Enfoque centrado en la intención de los padres

El fallo del Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 9º Circuito en Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 301] ha sido altamente influyente al disponer que, por lo general, debería haber una intención establecida de abandonar una residencia habitual antes de que un menor pueda adquirir una nueva.

Esta interpretación ha sido adoptada y desarrollada en otras sentencias de tribunales federales de apelación, de modo tal que la ausencia de intención compartida de los padres respecto del objeto de la mudanza derivó en la conservación de la residencia habitual vigente, aunque el menor hubiera estado fuera de dicho Estado durante un período de tiempo extenso. Véanse por ejemplo:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009, 1014 (9th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 777]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos luego de 8 meses de una estadía intencional de cuatro años en Alemania;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247, 1253 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 780]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 32 meses en México;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 482]: conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 27 meses en Grecia;

El enfoque en el asunto Mozes ha sido aprobado asimismo por el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Circuitos 2º y 7º:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124, 129-30 (2d Cir. 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (7th Cir.2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 878].

Con respecto al enfoque aplicado en el asunto Mozes, cabe destacar que el 9º Circuito sí reconoció que, con tiempo suficiente y una experiencia positiva, la vida de un menor podría integrarse tan firmemente en el nuevo país de manera de pasar a tener residencia habitual allí sin perjuicio de las intenciones en contrario que pudieren tener los padres.

Otros Estados

Hay diferencias en los enfoques que adoptan otros Estados.

Austria
La Corte Suprema de Austria ha establecido que un periodo de residencia superior a seis meses en un Estado será considerado generalmente residencia habitual, aún en el caso en que sea contra la voluntad de la persona que se encarga del cuidado del niño (ya que se trata de una determinación fáctica del centro de su vida).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canadá
En la Provincia de Quebec se adopta un enfoque centrado en el menor:

En el asunto Droit de la famille 3713, N° 500-09-010031-003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 651], el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Montreal sostuvo que la determinación de la residencia habitual de un menor es una cuestión puramente fáctica que debe resolverse a la luz de las circunstancias del caso, teniendo en cuenta la realidad de la vida del menor, más que a la de sus padres. El plazo de residencia efectiva debe ser por un período de tiempo significativo e ininterrumpido y el menor debe tener un vínculo real y activo con el lugar. Sin embargo, no se establece un período de residencia mínimo.

Alemania
En la jurisprudencia alemana se evidencia asimismo un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

Esto condujo a que el Tribunal Federal Constitucional aceptara que la residencia habitual se puede adquirir sin perjuicio de que el niño haya sido trasladado de forma ilícita al nuevo Estado de residencia:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

El Tribunal Constitucional confirmó la decisión del Tribunal Regional de Apelaciones por la que se estableció que los niños habían adquirido residencia habitual en Francia, sin perjuicio de la naturaleza de su traslado a ese lugar. La fundamentación consistió en que la residencia habitual es un concepto fáctico y que durante los nueve meses que estuvieron allí, los niños se integraron al entorno local.

Israel
En este país se adoptaron enfoques alternativos para determinar la residencia habitual del niño. Algunas veces se ha puesto bastante atención en las intenciones de los padres. Véanse:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

No obstante, en otros casos se ha hecho referencia a un enfoque más centrado en el menor. Véase:

decisión de la Corte Suprema en C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 922].

Nueva Zelanda
Asimismo, cabe destacar que, a diferencia del enfoque adoptado en Mozes, la mayoría de los miembros del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Nueva Zelanda rechazó expresamente la idea de que para adquirir una nueva residencia habitual se deba tener una intención establecida de abandonar la residencia habitual vigente. Véase:

S.K. v K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suiza
En la jurisprudencia suiza se puede ver un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Reino Unido
El enfoque estándar consiste en considerar la intención establecida de las personas que se encargan del cuidado del menor en consonancia con la realidad fáctica de la vida de aquel.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Para una opinión doctrinaria acerca de los diferentes enfoques sobre el concepto de residencia habitual en los países del common law, véanse:

R. Schuz, Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice, Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13 1 (2001) 1.

R. Schuz, Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context, Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 101 (2001).

¿Puede dejarse a un menor sin residencia habitual?

En la jurisprudencia temprana relativa al Convenio se advertía una clara reticencia de los tribunales de apelación a concluir que un menor carecía de residencia habitual. Esto se debía a la preocupación de que dicha conclusión tornara al instrumento inaplicable. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 40];

Australia
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 104].

Sin embargo, más recientemente, se ha reconocido que existen situaciones en las que no es posible considerar que un menor tiene residencia habitual en algún lugar:

D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 870].

En este caso, la mayoría aceptó que podía decirse que su decisión privaba al menor de la protección del Convenio. No obstante, la mayoría afirmó que, por lo general, el interés del menor puede verse negativamente afectado por la tendencia de los tribunales a resolver que un padre que intenta una reconciliación en un país extranjero pasa a tener su "residencia habitual" en dicho país extranjero al igual que el menor.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 470];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 194];

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 351];

Nueva Zelanda
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816];

Estados Unidos de América
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 529];

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 797].

¿Puede un menor tener más de una residencia habitual?

Durante mucho tiempo, comentaristas académicos han sostenido que si la naturaleza fáctica del factor de conexión ha de respetarse, pueden surgir situaciones en las que una persona tenga residencia habitual en más de un lugar en un momento dado. Véase en particular:

Clive E. M., The Concept of Habitual Residence, Juridical Review (1997), 137.

Sin embargo, el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Inglaterra ha aceptado que, en el contexto de la competencia en materia de divorcio, es posible que un adulto tenga residencia habitual en dos lugares simultáneamente. Véase:

Ikimi v. Ikimi [2001] EWCA Civ 873, [2002] Fam 72.

No obstante, en el marco de procesos relativos al Convenio, los tribunales han adoptado la opinión de que un menor solo puede tener un lugar de residencia habitual. Véanse, por ejemplo:

Canadá
SS-C c GC, Cour supérieure (Montréal), 15 août 2003, n° 500-04-033270-035, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 916];

Wilson v. Huntley (2005) A.C.W.S.J. 7084; 138 A.C.W.S. (3d) 1107 [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 800].

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re V. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1995] 2 FLR 992, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 45].

En este caso en el que los menores vivían entre Grecia e Inglaterra, el tribunal sostuvo que su residencia habitual también variaba. El tribunal descartó que tuvieran residencia habitual en Grecia y en Inglaterra en simultaneo.

Estados Unidos de América
Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, (6th Cir. 1993) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 142].

Mudanza o instalación en el extranjero

Cuando existen pruebas claras de la intención de emprender una nueva vida en otro Estado, la residencia habitual actual se perderá y se adquirirá una nueva.

En jurisdicciones de common law, se acepta que la adquisición de una nueva residencia habitual puede ocurrir en un período de tiempo breve. Véase:

Canadá
DeHaan v. Gracia [2004] AJ No.94 (QL), [2004] ABQD 4, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 576];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2];

Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 40].


Suiza

Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) Décision du 15 novembre 2005, 5P.367/2005 /ast, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Mudanza sometida a una condición futura

Si el acuerdo de los padres con respecto a instalarse en otro país se somete a una condición futura, ¿la residencia habitual previa a la mudanza se pierde inmediatamente al dejar ese país?

Australia

El Tribunal de Familia de Australia en pleno respondió a esta pregunta en negativo y sostuvo además que la pérdida de la residencia habitual puede incluso no derivarse del cumplimiento de la condición si el padre que tiene intenciones de mudarse no se compromete claramente con la mudanza en ese momento. Véase:


Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 995].

Sin embargo, esta sentencia fue revocada en apelación por el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Australia, el que declaró que la residencia habitual puede perderse si la voluntad de mudarse había sido continua de manera de poder ser descrita como firme. No hace falta tener una intención firme para establecer residencia “a largo plazo”.

L.K. v. Director-General Department of Community Services [2009] HCA 9, (2009) 253 ALR 202, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 1012].

Instalación en el extranjero por tiempo indefinido

Cuando la instalación en el extranjero es por tiempo indefinido o posiblemente lo sea, la residencia habitual al momento de la mudanza puede perderse y una nueva adquirirse relativamente rápido. Véase:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales (Caso no comprendido en el ámbito del Convenio)

Al Habtoor v. Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 875];

Nueva Zelanda
Callaghan v. Thomas [2001] NZFLR 1105 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 413];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Cameron v. Cameron 1996 SC 17, 1996 SLT 306, 1996 SCLR 25 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 71];

Moran v. Moran 1997 SLT 541 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 74];

Estados Unidos de América
Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

Instalación en el extranjero por un tiempo limitado

Cuando la instalación en el extranjero es por un tiempo limitado, aunque sea por un período extenso, ciertos Estados contratantes han aceptado que la residencia habitual anterior pueda conservarse durante ese período. Véase:


Dinamarca
Ø.L.K., 5. Abril 2002, 16. afdeling, B-409-02 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DK 520];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re H. (Abduction: Habitual Residence: Consent) [2000] 2 FLR 294; [2000] 3 FCR 412 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 478];

Estados Unidos de América
Morris v. Morris, 55 F. Supp. 2d 1156 (D. Colo., Aug. 30, 1999) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 306];

Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 301].

No obstante, en un caso en que una mudanza había de extenderse por dos años, el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones para el Tercer Circuito concluyó que se había producido un cambio de residencia habitual poco después de la mudanza. Véase:

Whiting v. Krassner, 391 F.3d 540 (3rd Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 778].

En un fallo inglés de primera instancia, se sostuvo que un menor había adquirido residencia habitual en Alemania luego de cinco meses si bien la familia se había mudado allí sólo por un contrato temporal de seis meses. Véase:

Re R. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [2003] EWHC 1968 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 580].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones de China (RAE de Hong Kong) consideró que una mudanza por un período de meses había prducido el cambio de residencia habitual:

B.L.W. v. B.W.L. [2007] 2 HKLRD 193, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 975].

Riesgos asociados a la situación en el Estado de residencia habitual del niño

En algunas ocasiones, la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido invocada, no con respecto a un riesgo específico para el menor, sino a la situación imperante en el Estado de residencia habitual.

En la célebre sentencia de apelación de los Estados Unidos Friedrich v. Friedrich, 78 F.3d 1060 (6th Cir. 1996) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 82], el tribunal declaró, entre otras cosas, que solo podía existir un riesgo grave cuando el retorno pudiera exponer al menor a un peligro inminente antes de la resolución de la cuestión de la custodia, por ejemplo, si se restituyera al menor a una zona azotada por la guerra o la hambruna.

Esta cuestión se ha planteado sobre todo con respecto a Israel.

Retorno a Israel

La cuestión de si el retorno de un menor a Israel lo expondría a un riesgo grave ha generado divisiones entre los tribunales. Sin embargo, la mayoría ha considerado que no sería el caso. Véanse:

Argentina
A. v. A. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 487]

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 995]

Bélgica
No 03/3585/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 547]

Canadá
Docket No 1 F 3709/00; C., 4 December 2001, Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Court File No 01-FA-10575

Dinamarca
V.L.K., 11. januar 2002, 13. afdeling, B-2939-01 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DK 519]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Francia
CA Aix en Provence, 8 octobre 2002, No de RG 02/14917 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 509]

Alemania
1 F 3709/00, Familiengericht Zweibrücken, 25 January 2001 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 392]

Estado Unidos de América
Freier v. Freier, 969 F. Supp. 436 (E.D. Mich. 1996) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 133]

No obstante, el argumento ha sido acogido en varias ocasiones:

Australia
Janine Claire Genish-Grant and Director-General Department of Community Services [2002] FamCA 346 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 458]

Estado Unidos de América
Silverman v. Silverman, 2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 8313 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 481] (see however: Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 530])  

Retorno a Zimbabue

En 2008, la Cámara de los Lores, máxima instancia en el Reino Unido, rechazó un argumento según el cual el ambiente político y social en Zimbabue era de una naturaleza tal que el retorno de niños a ese país los expondría a un riesgo grave de daño psicológico o a una situación intolerable.

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55 [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Retorno a México

CA Rennes, 28 juin 2011, No de RG 11/02685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1129]

La madre alegó la contaminación de la ciudad de México, el nivel de inseguridad a causa de la delincuencia en dicha metrópolis, y el riesgo de terremotos. No demostró, sin embargo, cómo estos riesgos afectaban en forma personal y directa a los menores. En un documento que había enviado al padre en 2010, en lugar de mencionar esos factores como los motivos de su decisión de mudarse a Francia, se había referido a dificultades de índole económica y familiar. Asimismo, el tribunal de apelaciones señaló que esos factores no le habían impedido vivir en México de 1998 a 2010 y criar allí a dos niños. Indicó, además, que la madre no había estimado conveniente solicitar autorización a las autoridades mexicanas para mudarse a Francia con sus hijos, sin explicar las razones que, a su entender, podían poner en peligro su derecho a un procedimiento justo en México.

El tribunal de apelaciones aclaró que no estaba afirmando que las pretensiones de la madre carecieran de fundamento. Podrían utilizarse cuando se tratara la cuestión de fondo de la custodia, pero no constituían prueba suficiente de riesgo grave.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)