CASE

No full text available

Case Name

W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKe 470

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

High Court

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Hedley J.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Decision

Date

18 February 2002

Status

-

Grounds

-

Order

Application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Al Habtoor v Fotheringham [2001] EWCA Civ 186, [2001] 1 FLR 951, CA; Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249, CA; B. v. H. (Habitual Residence: Wardship) [2002] 1 FLR 388, FD; Re J.S. (Private International Adoption) [2000] 2 FLR 638, FD; Re M. (Abduction: Habitual Residence) [1996] 1 FLR 887, CA.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

General Approach to Interpretation
Pérez-Vera Report
Autonomous Concepts
Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence
Can a Child be left without a Habitual Residence?

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
Sources of Custody Rights
Who may Hold Rights of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Implementation & Application Issues

Procedural Matters
Oral Evidence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The twin children were born in England to a surrogate mother. At the date of the hearing they were 3 months old and had spent all of their lives in England. The surrogacy agreement was made in California on 12 February 2001 between a married Californian couple and an English woman. It was agreed that the English surrogate mother would carry embryos nurtured from the egg of an anonymous donor and fertilised by the sperm of the Californian husband.

Consequently, only the husband would have any biological connection with the child. The agreement contemplated that after the necessary medical procedures the surrogate mother would go home to England and only return to California for the birth, at which the husband and wife would be present. The Californian couple would take immediate possession of the child after the birth.

The surrogate mother underwent the necessary treatment in accordance with the agreement. However, it was then discovered that she was carrying twins and this led to a dispute between the parties. The surrogate mother invoked the jurisdiction of the California courts.

On 3 October 2001 a Californian court awarded "joint physical and legal custody of each of the children upon birth" to the Californian couple. The order further stated that the surrogate mother had "no mother-child relationship with either child and no obligations of, nor rights of, a parent-child relationship with either of the children".

The surrogate mother did not contest this order having returned to England. She subsequently determined to give birth in England and not to return to California. There followed many court applications, inter alia, the mother filed an application to appeal the order of 3 October. The Californian couple issued return proceedings under the Hague Convention, claiming that the twins were being wrongfully retained in the United Kingdom.

Ruling

Application dismissed; the children were found to be without a habitual residence therefore the Convention was not applicable.

INCADAT comment

The Californian parents subsequently made a non-Hague application for the return of the children. This was granted under the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court: W and W v H (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) No 2 [2002] 2 FLR 252. Hedley J., who again heard the application, ordered the return of the children to California. He ruled that California was the most convenient jurisdiction for a merits hearing on the future of the twins.

It was the jurisdiction in which the biological father and his wife were living, the jurisdiction in which the surrogacy agreement had been made and, significantly, the jurisdiction which had been seized by the surrogate mother. He further noted that the case had only an accidental connection with England and that the obligations of comity required the High Court to trust the Californian court to act consistently with the best interests of the children.

Albeit dealing with a different factual situation it may be noted that in an earlier English case it was found that a child had acquired a habitual residence in Texas having been born there and having lived there for two days, see: Re J.S. (Private International Adoption) [2000] 2 FLR 638; [2000] Fam Law 787 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 479].

In an American appellate decision it was found that a child did not acquire a habitual residence in the State in which it was born and in which it spent the first two months of its life as the parents did not share a settled intention for the child to live there, see: Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 529].

Pérez-Vera Report

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Autonomous Concepts

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Can a Child be left without a Habitual Residence?

In early Convention case law there was a clear reluctance on the part of appellate courts to find that a child did not have a habitual residence.  This was because of the concern that such a conclusion would render the instrument inoperable, see:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40];

Australia
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 104].

However, in more recent years there has been a recognition that situations do exist where it is not possible to regard a child as being habitually resident anywhere:

Australia
D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 870].

In this case the majority accepted that their decision could be said to deny the child of the benefit of the Convention. However, the majority argued that the interests of children generally could be adversely affected if courts were too willing to find that a parent who had attempted a reconciliation in a foreign country, was to be found, together with the child, to have become "habitually resident" in that foreign country.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 470];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 194];

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 351];

New Zealand
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 816];

United States of America
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 529];

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/US 797].

Sources of Custody Rights

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Who may Hold Rights of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Oral Evidence

To ensure that Convention cases are dealt with expeditiously, as is required by the Convention, courts in a number of jurisdictions have restricted the use of oral evidence, see:

Australia
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 277]

It should be noted however that more recently Australia's supreme jurisdiction, the High Court, has cautioned against the ‘inadequate, albeit prompt, disposition of return applications', rather a ‘thorough examination on adequate evidence of the issues' was required, see:

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 988].

Canada
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 758].

The Court of Appeal for Ontario held that if credibility was a serious issue, courts should consider hearing viva voce evidence of witnesses whose credibility is in issue.

China - Hong Kong
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/HK 234];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 40];

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

In the above case it was accepted that a situation where oral evidence should be allowed was where the affidavit evidence was in direct conflict.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 771]

In the above case the Court of Appeal ruled that a trial judge could consider of his own motion to allow oral evidence where he conceived that oral evidence might be determinative of the case.

However, to warrant oral exploration of written evidence as to the existence of a grave risk of harm which was only embryonic on the written material, a judge must be satisfied that there was a realistic possibility that oral evidence would establish an Article 13(1) b) case.

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 906]

Here the Court of Appeal affirmed that where the exception of acquiescence was alleged oral evidence was more commonly allowed because of the necessity to ascertain the applicant's subjective state of mind, as well as his communications in response to knowledge of the removal or retention.

Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FI 839].

Ireland
In the Matter of M. N. (A Child) [2008] IEHC 382; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 992].

The trial judge noted that applications were heard on affidavit evidence only, except where the Court, in exceptional circumstances, directed or permitted oral evidence.

New Zealand
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 492];

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 248];

South Africa
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 497];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

In the above case the Supreme Court of Appeal noted that even where the parties had not requested that oral evidence be admitted, it might be required where a finding on the issue of consent could not otherwise be reached.

United States of America
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 797]

The father argued that the trial court denied him a fair hearing because it determined disputed issues of fact without hearing oral evidence from the parties.

The Court of Appeal rejected this submission noting that nothing in the Hague Convention entitled the father to an evidentiary hearing with sworn witness testimony. Moreover, it noted that under California law declarations could be used in place of witness testimony in various situations.

The Court further ruled that the father could not question the propriety of the procedure used with regard to evidence on appeal because he did not object to the use of affidavits in evidence at trial.

For a consideration of the use of oral evidence in Convention proceedings see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 at p. 257 et seq.

Under the rules applicable within the European Union for intra-EU abductions (Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (Brussels II a)) Convention applications are now subject to additional provisions, including the requirement that an applicant be heard before a non-return order is made [Article 11(5) Brussels II a Regulation], and, that the child be heard ‘during the proceedings unless this appears inappropriate having regard to his or her age or degree of maturity' [Article 11(2) Brussels II a Regulation].

Faits

Les jumeaux étaient nés en Angleterre d'une mère porteuse. A la date de l'audience ils étaient âgés de 3 mois et avaient passé toute leur vie en Angleterre. La contrat de maternité de substitution entre la mère porteuse anglaise et les parents (un couple marié d'Américains) avait été conclu en Californie le 12 février 2001. Il avait été décidé que la mère porteuse anglaise porterait des embryons générés à partir d'un ovule d'un donneur anonyme et fertilisé par le sperme du mari californien.

Par conséquent, seul le mari aurait une connexion biologique avec l'enfant. Il était prévu par le contrat que la mère porteuse, ayant subi les traitements et procédures médicales nécessaires, pourrait rentrer en Angleterre et ne retourner en Californie que pour la naissance, à laquelle le couple marié assisterait. Le couple américain prendrait possession de l'enfant immédiatement après la naissance.

La mère porteuse suivit le traitement prévu. Toutefois, on découvrit qu'elle portait des jumeaux, ce qui conduisit à un litige entre les parties au contrat. La mère porteuse saisit les juridictions californiennes.

Le 3 octobre 2001, la juridiction saisie donna la « garde physique et légale conjointe de chacun des enfants à naître' au couple californien. La décision mentionna également que la mère de substitution n'avait 'aucune relation de mère à enfant avec aucun des enfants et ni droit, ni obligation légale découlant de cette relation.»

La mère porteuse ne contesta pas cette décision après son retour en Angleterre. Elle prit la décision de donner naissance aux enfants en Angleterre et de ne pas retourner aux Etats-Unis. Plusieurs instances judiciaires s'ensuivirent. Entre autres, la mère porteuse forma appel de la décision californienne du 3 octobre.

Le couple californien demanda le retour des enfants en application de la Convention de La Haye, estimant que les jumeaux faisaient l'objet d'un non-retour illicite.

Dispositif

Demande rejetée; les enfants n'ayant aucune résidence habituelle, la Convention de La Haye était inapplicable.

Commentaire INCADAT

Les parents californiens formèrent ensuite une demande non fondée sur la Convention de La Haye. Elle fut entendue par la High Court. Voy.: W and W v H (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) No 2 [2002] 2 FLR 252. Le juge Hedley J., qui fut de nouveau saisi de la demande, ordonna le retour des enfants en Californie. Il indiqua que les juridictions californiennes étaient le forum le plus propre à connaître de questions de fond concernant l'avenir des enfants.

'est en effet en Californie que le père biologique et son épouse vivaient, c'est en Californie que le contrat de maternité de substitution avait été signé et la mère porteuse elle-même avait saisi les juridictions de cet Etat. Il ajouta que l'affaire n'avait qu'un lien accidentel avec l'Angleterre et que des obligations de courtoisie internationale imposaient à la High Court de considérer que les juridictions californiennes étaient en mesure d'agir dans l'intérêt supérieur des enfants.

Bien que portant sur une situation factuelle différente, il peut être noté que dans une précédente décision anglaise, il a été décidé qu'un enfant avait acquis une résidence habituelle au Texas en y étant né et y ayant vécu deux jours, voir : Re J.S. (Private International Adoption) [2000] 2 FLR 638; [2000] Fam Law 787 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 479].

Dans une décision d'appel américaine, il a été estimé qu'un enfant n'acquérait pas une résidence habituelle dans l'État où il était né et dans lequel il avait passé les deux premiers mois de sa vie car les parents ne partageaient pas l'intention ferme que l'enfant y vive, voir : Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 529].

Rapport Pérez-Vera

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Concepts autonomes

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Un enfant peut-il se trouver sans résidence habituelle?

Dans la jurisprudence conventionnelle ancienne, les cours se sont montrées peu enclines à admettre qu'un enfant puisse se trouver sans résidence habituelle, notamment en raison du fait qu'une telle conclusion rendait inapplicable la Convention, voir :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40];

Australie
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 104].

Toutefois, plus récemment on constate que les cours reconnaissent qu'il y a des situations dans lesquelles il est impossible d'admettre que l'enfant a une résidence habituelle quelque part.

D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 870].

Dans cette affaire, la majorité des juges a estimé que certes leur conclusion empêchait l'application de la Convention mais a souligné que l'intérêt des enfants pouvait pâtir d'une trop grande propension des tribunaux à admettre que le parent ayant tenté de se réconcilier avec l'autre parent en vivant avec lui à l'étranger afin de donner à l'enfant une famille biparentale doit, avec l'enfant, avoir acquis une résidence habituelle dans cet État.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 470] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 194] ;

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 351] ;

Nouvelle-Zélande
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 816] ;

États-Unis d'Amérique
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 529] ;

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 797].

Sources du droit de garde

Analyse de la jurisprudence de INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Qui peut obtenir le droit de garde au sens de la Convention?

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Preuve présentée oralement

Pour permettre que les affaires relevant de la Convention fassent l'objet d'un traitement rapide, ainsi que le requiert la Convention, les juridictions d'un certain nombre d'États contractants ont restreint l'usage de procédés de preuve orale. Voir :

Australie
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 277]

Il convient toutefois de noter que plus récemment, la Cour suprême d'Australie, la (High Court) a mis en garde contre un traitement « diligent mais inadéquat des demandes de retour », soulignant l'importance d'une « analyse sérieuse, basée sur des éléments de preuve adéquats ». Voir :

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 988].

Canada
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 758].

Chine (Région administrative spéciale de Hong Kong)
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/HK 234] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 40] ;

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 37] ;

En l'espèce, il fut précisé qu'on pouvait admettre une procédure orale lorsque les témoignages et éléments de preuve écrite étaient contradictoires.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 771] ;

En l'espèce, la Cour d'appel décida que le juge du premier degré pouvait admettre d'office des preuves présentées oralement lorsqu'il estimait que cela aurait une influence sur l'issue de l'affaire.

Toutefois, le juge devait être convaincu d'une possibilité réelle d'application de l'exception de l'article 13(1) b) pour justifier la recherche de déclarations orales portant sur des preuves écrites quant à l'existence d'un risque grave de danger, qui n'était que sous-jacente dans les preuves écrites.

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 906] ;

En l'espèce, la Cour d'appel affirma que lorsqu'un acquiescement est allégué, le recours à des preuves présentées oralement était plus communément autorisé car il est nécessaire de s'assurer de l'état d'esprit subjectif du demandeur, ainsi que de ses communications en réaction au déplacement ou au non-retour une fois qu'il en a connaissance. 

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839].

Irlande
In the Matter of M. N. (A CHILD) [2008] IEHC 382; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 992].

Le juge indiqua que les demandes étaient traitées sur la base d'éléments de preuve écrite, sauf si un juge imposait ou permettait, dans des circonstances exceptionnelles, le recours à la preuve orale.

Nouvelle-Zélande
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 492] ;

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 248] ;

Afrique du Sud
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 497] ;

Central Authority v. Houwert [2007] SCA 88 (RSA); [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

En l'espèce la Cour suprême observa que même si le recours à des preuves présentées oralement n'a pas été requis par les parties, ce procédé pouvait s'imposer lorsque la cour ne parvient pas à établir autrement l'existence d'un consentement.

États-Unis d’Amérique
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 797].

Pour un exemple d'étude concernant l'utilisation de preuves présentées oralement dans les affaires relevant de la Convention, voir : P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 257 et seq.

Les règles applicables aux enlèvements d'enfants dans le cadre de l'Union européenne uniquement (RÈGLEMENT (CE) No 2201/2003 Du Conseil (Bruxelles II bis)) impliquent que lors des demandes conventionnelles le demandeur doit être entendu pour qu'une décision de non-retour soit rendue (art. 11(5) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis), et que l'enfant en cause soit entendu « au cours de la procédure, à moins que cela n'apparaisse inapproprié eu égard à son âge ou à son degré de maturité. » (art. 11(2) du Règlement de Bruxelles II bis).

Hechos

Los menores, mellizos, nacieron en Inglaterra y fueron dados a luz por una madre sustituta. A la fecha de la audiencia, tenían 3 meses de edad y habían pasado toda su vida en Inglaterra. El acuerdo de alquiler de vientre se celebró en California, el 12 de febrero de 2001, entre un matrimonio californiano y una mujer inglesa. Se convino que la madre sustituta inglesa llevaría en su vientre a embriones criados a partir del óvulo de una donante anónima y fertilizados con el esperma del marido de la pareja californiana.

En consecuencia, sólo el marido tendría una conexión biológica con el menor. El acuerdo contemplaba que luego de los procedimientos médicos necesarios, la madre sustituta regresaría a su hogar en Inglaterra y sólo volvería a California para el nacimiento, en el cual estaría presente el matrimonio. La pareja tomaría de inmediato la tenencia del menor luego del nacimiento.

La madre sustituta se sometió al tratamiento necesario conforme al acuerdo. Sin embargo, luego se descubrió que tenía mellizos y esto llevó a una controversia entre las partes. La madre sustituta invocó la jurisdicción de los tribunales de California.

El 3 de octubre de 2001, un tribunal californiano le concedió "la custodia legal y física de cada uno de los menores luego del nacimiento" al matrimonio californiano. La orden asimismo estableció que la madre sustituta no tenía "ningún vínculo de madre-hijo/hija con ninguno de los menores y tampoco obligaciones o derechos de una relación padre/madre-hijo/hija con ninguno de los menores".

La madre sustituta no disputó esta orden luego de regresar a Inglaterra. Posteriormente, decidió dar a luz en Inglaterra y no regresar a California. Luego siguieron muchas solicitudes judiciales, entre otras, la madre presentó una solicitud para apelar la orden del 3 de octubre. La pareja californiana inició un proceso de restitución en el marco del Convenio de la Haya, reclamando que los mellizos estaban siendo retenidos ilegalmente en el Reino Unido.

Fallo

Solicitud rechazada; se concluyó que los menores no tenían una residencia habitual y por lo tanto el Convenio no era aplicable.

Comentario INCADAT

Los padres californianos posteriormente presentaron una solicitud, no en virtud del Convenio de la Haya, para la restitución de los menores. Esto se realizó en el marco de la jurisdicción propia del Tribunal Superior. La decisión se informa en: W and W v H (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) No 2 [2002] 2 FLR 252, [2002] Fam Law 501. Hedley J., quien nuevamente entendió en la solicitud, ordenó la restitución de los menores a California. Determinó que California era la jurisdicción más conveniente para una audiencia sobre los méritos respecto del futuro de los mellizos.

Era la jurisdicción en la cual vivían el padre biológico y su esposa, la jurisdicción donde se celebró el acuerdo de alquiler de vientre y, significativamente, la jurisdicción que había elegido la madre sustituta. Asimismo señaló que el caso tenía sólo una conexión accidental con Inglaterra, y que las obligaciones de respeto mutuo exigían que el Tribunal Superior confiara en el tribunal de California para actuar congruentemente con los mejores intereses de los menores.

Si bien se trata de una situación de hecho diferente, se puede señalar que en un caso inglés anterior se concluyó que un menor había adquirido una residencia habitual en Texas por haber nacido allí y haber vivido allí durante dos días, véase: Re J.S. (Private International Adoption) [2000] 2 FLR 638; [2000] Fam Law 787 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 479].

En una decisión de segunda instancia en Estados Unidos se determinó que un menor no adquirió una residencia habitual en el Estado en el que nació y vivió durante sus primeros dos meses de vida puesto que los padres no compartían una intención firme de que el menor viviera allí, véase: Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 529].

Informe Explicativo - Pérez-Vera

En curso de elaboración.

Conceptos autónomos

En curso de elaboración.

Residencia habitual

La interpretación del concepto central de residencia habitual (Preámbulo, art. 3, art. 4) ha demostrado ser cada vez más problemática en años recientes con interpretaciones divergentes que surgen de distintos Estados contratantes. No hay uniformidad respecto de si al momento de determinar la residencia habitual el énfasis debe estar sobre el niño exclusivamente, prestando atención a las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor, o si debe estar primordialmente en las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor. Al menos en parte como resultado, la residencia habitual puede parecer constituir un factor de conexión muy flexible en algunos Estados contratantes y mucho más rígido y reflejo de la residencia a largo plazo en otros.

La valoración de la interpretación de residencia habitual se torna aún más complicada por el hecho de que los casos que se concentran en el concepto pueden involucrar situaciones fácticas muy diversas. A modo de ejemplo, la residencia habitual puede tener que considerarse como consecuencia de una mudanza permanente, o una mudanza más tentativa, aunque tenga una duración indefinida o potencialmente indefinida, o la mudanza pueda ser, de hecho, por un plazo de tiempo definido.

Tendencias generales:

La jurisprudencia de los tribunales federales de apelación de los Estados Unidos de América puede tomarse como ejemplo de la amplia gama de interpretaciones existentes en lo que respecta a la residencia habitual.

Enfoque centrado en el menor

El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 6º Circuito ha apoyado firmemente el enfoque centrado en el menor en la determinación de la residencia habitual.

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F. 2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/Ee/USF 142];

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 935].

Veáse también:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 221].

Enfoque combinado: conexión del menor / intención de los padres

Los Tribunales Federales de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América de los 3º y 8º  Circuitos han adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor pero que igualmente tiene en cuenta las intenciones compartidas de los padres.

El fallo clave es el del caso: Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 83].

Veánse también:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

En este último asunto se estableció una distinción entre las situaciones que involucran a niños muy pequeños, en las cuales se atribuye especial importancia a las intenciones de los padres (véase por ejemplo: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 808]) y aquellas que involucran a niños más mayores, donde el impacto de las intenciones de los padres ya es más limitado.

Enfoque centrado en la intención de los padres

El fallo del Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 9º Circuito en Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 301] ha sido altamente influyente al disponer que, por lo general, debería haber una intención establecida de abandonar una residencia habitual antes de que un menor pueda adquirir una nueva.

Esta interpretación ha sido adoptada y desarrollada en otras sentencias de tribunales federales de apelación, de modo tal que la ausencia de intención compartida de los padres respecto del objeto de la mudanza derivó en la conservación de la residencia habitual vigente, aunque el menor hubiera estado fuera de dicho Estado durante un período de tiempo extenso. Véanse por ejemplo:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009, 1014 (9th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 777]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos luego de 8 meses de una estadía intencional de cuatro años en Alemania;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247, 1253 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 780]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 32 meses en México;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 482]: conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 27 meses en Grecia;

El enfoque en el asunto Mozes ha sido aprobado asimismo por el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Circuitos 2º y 7º:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124, 129-30 (2d Cir. 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (7th Cir.2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 878].

Con respecto al enfoque aplicado en el asunto Mozes, cabe destacar que el 9º Circuito sí reconoció que, con tiempo suficiente y una experiencia positiva, la vida de un menor podría integrarse tan firmemente en el nuevo país de manera de pasar a tener residencia habitual allí sin perjuicio de las intenciones en contrario que pudieren tener los padres.

Otros Estados

Hay diferencias en los enfoques que adoptan otros Estados.

Austria
La Corte Suprema de Austria ha establecido que un periodo de residencia superior a seis meses en un Estado será considerado generalmente residencia habitual, aún en el caso en que sea contra la voluntad de la persona que se encarga del cuidado del niño (ya que se trata de una determinación fáctica del centro de su vida).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canadá
En la Provincia de Quebec se adopta un enfoque centrado en el menor:

En el asunto Droit de la famille 3713, N° 500-09-010031-003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 651], el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Montreal sostuvo que la determinación de la residencia habitual de un menor es una cuestión puramente fáctica que debe resolverse a la luz de las circunstancias del caso, teniendo en cuenta la realidad de la vida del menor, más que a la de sus padres. El plazo de residencia efectiva debe ser por un período de tiempo significativo e ininterrumpido y el menor debe tener un vínculo real y activo con el lugar. Sin embargo, no se establece un período de residencia mínimo.

Alemania
En la jurisprudencia alemana se evidencia asimismo un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

Esto condujo a que el Tribunal Federal Constitucional aceptara que la residencia habitual se puede adquirir sin perjuicio de que el niño haya sido trasladado de forma ilícita al nuevo Estado de residencia:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

El Tribunal Constitucional confirmó la decisión del Tribunal Regional de Apelaciones por la que se estableció que los niños habían adquirido residencia habitual en Francia, sin perjuicio de la naturaleza de su traslado a ese lugar. La fundamentación consistió en que la residencia habitual es un concepto fáctico y que durante los nueve meses que estuvieron allí, los niños se integraron al entorno local.

Israel
En este país se adoptaron enfoques alternativos para determinar la residencia habitual del niño. Algunas veces se ha puesto bastante atención en las intenciones de los padres. Véanse:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

No obstante, en otros casos se ha hecho referencia a un enfoque más centrado en el menor. Véase:

decisión de la Corte Suprema en C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 922].

Nueva Zelanda
Asimismo, cabe destacar que, a diferencia del enfoque adoptado en Mozes, la mayoría de los miembros del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Nueva Zelanda rechazó expresamente la idea de que para adquirir una nueva residencia habitual se deba tener una intención establecida de abandonar la residencia habitual vigente. Véase:

S.K. v K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suiza
En la jurisprudencia suiza se puede ver un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Reino Unido
El enfoque estándar consiste en considerar la intención establecida de las personas que se encargan del cuidado del menor en consonancia con la realidad fáctica de la vida de aquel.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Para una opinión doctrinaria acerca de los diferentes enfoques sobre el concepto de residencia habitual en los países del common law, véanse:

R. Schuz, Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice, Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13 1 (2001) 1.

R. Schuz, Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context, Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 101 (2001).

¿Puede dejarse a un menor sin residencia habitual?

En la jurisprudencia temprana relativa al Convenio se advertía una clara reticencia de los tribunales de apelación a concluir que un menor carecía de residencia habitual. Esto se debía a la preocupación de que dicha conclusión tornara al instrumento inaplicable. Véanse:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 40];

Australia
Cooper v. Casey (1995) FLC 92-575 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 104].

Sin embargo, más recientemente, se ha reconocido que existen situaciones en las que no es posible considerar que un menor tiene residencia habitual en algún lugar:

D.W. & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2006] FamCA 93, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 870].

En este caso, la mayoría aceptó que podía decirse que su decisión privaba al menor de la protección del Convenio. No obstante, la mayoría afirmó que, por lo general, el interés del menor puede verse negativamente afectado por la tendencia de los tribunales a resolver que un padre que intenta una reconciliación en un país extranjero pasa a tener su "residencia habitual" en dicho país extranjero al igual que el menor.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
W. and B. v. H. (Child Abduction: Surrogacy) [2002] 1 FLR 1008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 470];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Robertson v. Robertson 1998 SLT 468 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 194];

D. v. D. 2002 SC 33 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 351];

Nueva Zelanda
S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816];

Estados Unidos de América
Delvoye v. Lee, 329 F.3d 330 (3rd Cir. 2003) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 529];

Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 797].

Fuentes del derecho de custodia

En curso de elaboración.

¿Quién puede asumir el derecho de custodia en el sentido del Convenio?

En curso de elaboración.

Prueba presentada oralmente

Para garantizar que los casos tramitados con arreglo al Convenio sean tratados con celeridad, como lo exige el Convenio, los tribunales en varias jurisdicciones han restringido el uso de la prueba testimonial. Véanse:

Australia
Gazi v. Gazi (1993) FLC 92-341, 16 Fam LR 18, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 277]

Debe observarse, sin embargo, que más recientemente la máxima instancia de Australia, la High Court, ha advertido contra la "resolución inadecuada, aunque pronta, de solicitudes de restitución", en cambio se exije un "examen minucioso respecto de las pruebas adecuadas". Véase:

M.W. v. Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] HCA 12, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 988].

Canadá
Katsigiannis v. Kottick-Katsigianni (2001), 55 O.R. (3d) 456 (C.A.), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 758]

El Tribunal de Apelaciones de Ontario sostuvo que si la credibilidad era un problema serio, los tribunales debían considerar escuchar las declaraciones de los testigos cuya credibilidad estuviera cuestionada en un procedimiento oral.

China - Hong Kong
S. v. S. [1998] 2 HKC 316, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/HK 234]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re F. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1992] 1 FLR 548, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 40];

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 37].

En el caso anteriormente mencionado se aceptó que una situación en la que debería permitirse la prueba testimonial era aquella en la que la prueba documental se encontraba en conflicto directo.

Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWCA Civ 1366, [2005] 1 FLR 727, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 771];

En el caso anterior, el Tribunal de Apelación falló que un juez de primera instancia podría considerar de oficio el permitir la prueba testimonial cuando considerara que la prueba testimonial puede resultar determinante para el caso.

Sin embargo, para garantizar la exploración verbal respecto de la existencia de un grave riesgo de daño que era solo embrionario en la prueba escrita, un juez debía estar convencido de que existía una posibilidad realista de que la prueba testimonial configurara un caso del artículo 13(1)(b).

Re F. (Abduction: Child's Wishes) [2007] EWCA Civ 468, [2007] 2 FLR 697, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 906];

En este caso el Tribunal de Apelación afirmó que cuando se alegaba la excepción de aceptación posterior, se permitía de manera más general la prueba testimonial debido a la necesidad de asegurar el estado mental subjetivo del solicitante, así como también sus comunicaciones en respuesta al conocimiento del traslado o retención.

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839].

Irlanda
In the Matter of M. N. (A Child) [2008] IEHC 382, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 992].

El juez de primera instancia observó que las solicitudes eran consideradas solo en relación a la prueba documental, excepto cuando el tribunal, en circunstancias excepcionales, ordenaba o permitía la prueba testimonial.

Nueva Zelanda
Secretary for Justice v. Abrahams, ex parte Brown, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 492];

Hall v. Hibbs [1995] NZFLR 762, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 248]

Sudáfrica
Pennello v. Pennello [2003] 1 All SA 716, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 497];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

En el caso que antecede la Corte Suprema de Apelaciones observó que incluso cuando las partes no habían solicitado que se admitiera la prueba testimonial, esta se podría exigir cuando la cuestión del consentimiento no pudiera resolverse de otro modo. 

Estados Unidos de América
Ferraris v. Alexander, 125 Cal. App. 4th 1417 (Cal. App. 3d. Dist., 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 797].

El padre argumentó que el juzgado de primera instancia le había negado una audiencia justa, dado que había determinado los asuntos de hecho en disputa sin escuchar la prueba testimonial de las partes.

El Tribunal de Apelaciones rechazó su planteo, destacando que nada en el Convenio de La Haya da al padre el derecho a una audiencia de prueba con declaración jurada de testigos. También destacó que, de conformidad con la legislación de California, los alegatos podían ser usados en lugar de la declaración testimonial en varias situaciones.

El Tribunal además estableció que el padre no podía cuestionar la procedencia del procedimiento utilizado con relación a la prueba en la apelación, porque no había objetado el uso de declaraciones juradas como prueba en el juicio.

Para la consideración del uso de la prueba testimonial en los procedimientos del Convenio, ver: Beaumont P.R. y McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' OUP, Oxford, 1999 en p. 257 y ss.

En virtud de las normas aplicables en la Unión Europea para las sustracciones entre Estados de la UE (Reglamento del Consejo (CE) Nº 2201/2003 (Bruselas II bis)), las solicitudes en virtud del Convenio actualmente están sujetas a disposiciones adicionales, entre ellas el requisito de que se escuche al solicitante antes de denegar la restitución [artículo 11(5) Reglamento de Bruselas II bis], y, que se escuche al niño "durante el proceso, a menos que esto no se considere conveniente habida cuenta de su edad o grado de madurez' [artículo 11(2) Reglamento de Bruselas II bis].