CASE

No full text available

Case Name

M. v. K., 20/06/2000; Iceland Supreme Court

INCADAT reference

HC/E/IS 363

Court

Country

ICELAND

Name

Supreme Court

Level

Superior Appellate Court

States involved

Requesting State

SPAIN

Requested State

ICELAND

Decision

Date

20 June 2000

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Appeal allowed, return ordered

HC article(s) Considered

3 5 12 13(2) 14 15 19

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 12 13(2)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to

-

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Return
Return Forthwith
Rights of Custody
Patria Potestas

Exceptions to Return

Child's Objection
Nature and Strength of Objection

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The parties lived in Spain, they separated in 1998 and divorced in 1999. Their two children, boys aged 10 and 13, lived with the mother after the separation and divorce. The mother had some custody rights, "custodia" and "cuidado", but other custody rights, notably, patria potestas, were shared by the parents. The mother took the children to Iceland in September 1999.

In November 1999 the father requested the return of the children through the Spanish Central Authority. On 19 April 2000 the District Court of Reykjanes refused to order the return of the boys. The mother had claimed to have sole custody which enabled her to decide where the children should reside.

The father appealed to the Supreme Court of Iceland. Leave was given for the submission of further evidence, including a psychiatrist's report regarding the views of the younger child and statements from a Spanish Judge and from the Central Authority of Spain regarding the Spanish law on custody.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and return ordered; the removal was wrongful and none of the exceptions had been proved to the standard required under the Convention.

INCADAT comment

While Icelandic legislation has only one term for the concept of custody Spanish law has four: "Patria Potestad", "Guardia", "Custodia" and "Cuidado". Under Icelandic law parents either have joint custody or one of them has sole custody.

Return Forthwith

Where a removal or retention is established as being wrongful and less that 12 months have elapsed before the commencement of the return proceedings, then Article 12(1) provides that the child shall be returned forthwith.  This is designed to give effect to the goal of restoring the pre-abduction situation as quickly as possibly.  However questions sometimes arise as to the modalities of return and whether, if at all, time should be allowed to make preparations or to allow the child finish the school term.  Practice varies on this issue.

United States of America
Sampson v. Sampson, 267 Kan. 175, 975 P.2d 1211 (Kan. App. 1999), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USs 226].

The trial court gave the mother 90 days to submit herself and the children to the jurisdiction of the Israeli courts.

In other cases the concept of the return 'forthwith' of a wrongfully removed or retained child has been interpreted much more strictly, see:

France
Procureur de la Rèpublique c. Bartège, 27 June 1994, transcript, Montpellier Court of Appeal [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63];

New Zealand
Fenton v. Morris, 28 July 1995, transcript, New Zealand District Court at Wellington [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 249];

United Kingdom - Scotland
D.I. Petitioner [1999] Green's Family Law Reports 126, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 352].

The trial judge held that the meaning of the term ‘return forthwith' depended on the circumstances of the case. It was agreed by the parties that the original time of two days was unrealistically short and a figure of seven days was agreed instead.

It has equally been noted that a return forthwith may no longer be appropriate where excessive delay has occurred since the commencement of the return proceedings:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880] : almost 4 years had elapsed since the arrival of the child.

Patria Potestas

The doctrine of patria potestas which continues to occupy a residual role in many Spanish speaking jurisdictions, has, when not otherwise limited or restricted, been interpreted by Courts in several Contracting States as giving rise to custody rights for the purposes of the Convention, see:

Iceland
The Supreme Court of Iceland has found that the removal of a child in breach of the patria potestas held by a father under Spanish law gave rise to a wrongful removal, see:

M. v. K., 20/06/2000; Iceland Supreme Court [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IS 363].

United Kingdom - Scotland
The Court of Session in Scotland has similarly found that the removal of a child in breach of the patria potestas held by a father under Spanish law gave rise to a wrongful removal, see:

Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 117 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183].

United States of America
In Whallon v. Lynn, 230 F.3d 450 (1st Cir. October 27, 2000) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 388] the concept of patria potestas under Mexican law was given the same interpretation;

In Gil v. Rodriguez, 184 F.Supp.2d 1221 (M.D.Fla.2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 462]

and

Vale v. Avila, 538 F.3d 581, (7th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 990]

the concept of patria potestas under Venezuelan law was given the same interpretation.

However, in the case of Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493], the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that the applicant father could not claim custody rights on the basis of the Mexican concept of patria potestas because he and the mother had executed a formal legal custody agreement.

Nature and Strength of Objection

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 93].

The supreme Australian jurisdiction, the High Court, advocated a literal interpretation of the term ‘objection'.  However, this was subsequently reversed by a legislative amendment, see:

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 inserted by the Family Law Amendment Act 2000.

Article 13(2), as implemented into Australian law by reg. 16(3) of the Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989, now provides not only that the child must object to a return, but that the objection must show a strength of feeling beyond the mere expression of a preference or of ordinary wishes.

See for example:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 904].

The issue as to whether a child must specifically object to the State of habitual residence has not been settled, see:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [INCADAT: cite HC/E/AT 549].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/BE 546].

A mere preference for the State of refuge is not enough to amount to an objection.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 1028].

To prove that a child objects, it must be shown that the child "displayed a strong sense of disagreement to returning to the jurisdiction of his habitual residence. He must be adamant in expressing his objection. The objection cannot be ascertained by simply weighing the pros and cons of the competing jurisdictions, such as in a best interests analysis. It must be something stronger than a mere expression of preference".

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 87] the Court of Appeal held that the return to which a child objects must be an immediate return to the country from which it was wrongfully removed. There is nothing in the provisions of Article 13 to make it appropriate to consider whether the child objects to returning in any circumstances.

In Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 56] it was, however, accepted that an objection to life with the applicant parent may be distinguishable from an objection to life in the former home country.

In Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] Ward L.J. set down a series of questions to assist in determining whether it was appropriate to take a child's objections into account.

These questions where endorsed by the Court of Appeal in Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 901].

For academic commentary see: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
Objections based solely on a preference for life in France or life with the abducting parent have not been upheld, see:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 63].

United Kingdom - Scotland
In Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 79] a broad interpretation was adopted, with the Inner House accepting that a strong preference for remaining with the abducting parent and for life in Scotland implicitly meant an objection to returning to the United States of America.

In W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 805] the Inner House, which accepted the Re T. [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 270] gateway test, held that objections relating to welfare matters were only to be dealt with by the authorities in the child's State of habitual residence.

In the subsequent first instance case: M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith noted the division in appellate case law and decided to follow the earlier line of authority as exemplified in Urness v. Minto.  She explicitly rejected the Re T. gateway tests.

The judge recorded in her judgment that there would have been an attempt to challenge the Inner House judgment in W. v. W. before the House of Lords but the case had been resolved amicably.

More recently a stricter approach to the objections has been followed, see:  C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 962]; upheld on appeal: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 996].

Switzerland
The highest Swiss court has stressed the importance of children being able to distinguish between issues relating to custody and issues relating to return, see:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 894].

A mere preference for life in the State of refuge, even if reasoned, will not satisfy the terms of Article 13(2):

5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 986].

For general academic commentary see: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Faits

Les parties vivaient en Espagne, se séparèrent en 1998 et divorcèrent en 1999. Les deux enfants, des garçons âgés de 10 et 13 ans, vivaient avec la mère depuis la séparation. Celle-ci avait certains droits de garde : « custodia » et « cuidado », mais d'autres droits de garde, notamment celui de patria potestas, étaient partagés par les parents. En septembre 1999, la mère emmena les enfants en Islande.

En novembre 1999, le père contacta l'Autorité Centrale espagnole d'une demande de retour. Le 20 avril 2000, le jude de première instance de Reykjanes refusa d'ordonner le retour des enfants. La mère avait fait valoir qu'elle avait la garde exclusive, ce qui lui permettait de décider du lieu de résidence des enfants.

Le père forma un recours devant la cour suprême d'Islande. Il fut autorisé à présenter d'autres éléments de preuve, parmi lesquels le rapport d'un expert psychiatre quant à l'opinion du plus jeune des enfants et des attestations d'un juge espagnols et de l'Autorité Centrale espagnole concernant le droit applicable en matière de garde dans cet Etat.

Dispositif

Le recours a été accueilli et le retour ordonné ; le déplacement était illicite et aucune des exceptions prévues par la Convention n'était applicable.

Commentaire INCADAT

Alors que le droit islandais ne connait qu'un terme pour désigner la notion de garde, le droit espagnol en utilise quatre : «Patria Potestad », « Guardia », « Custodia » and « Cuidado ». Selon le droit islandais, les parents ont soit la garde conjointe, soit l'un d'entre eux a la garde exclusive des enfants.

Retour immédiat

Lorsqu'un déplacement ou non-retour est avéré et que moins de 12 mois se sont écoulés au moment de l'introduction de la demande, l'article 12(1) prévoit le retour immédiat de l'enfant. Le but visé est la restauration effective la plus rapide possible de la situation précédant l'enlèvement. Toutefois des questions peuvent parfois se poser au sujet des modalités de retour ou de la concession éventuelle de délais afin de faire des préparatifs ou de permettre à l'enfant de terminer sa session scolaire. La pratique varie sur ce point.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Sampson v. Sampson, 267 Kan. 175, 975 P.2d 1211 (Kan. App. 1999), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USs 226

Le tribunal de première instance a donné 90 jours à la mère pour se soumettre avec les enfants à la compétence des tribunaux israéliens.

Dans d'autres cas, le concept de retour « immédiat » d'un enfant déplacé ou retenu illicitement a été interprété bien plus strictement, voir :

France
Procureur de la République c. Bartège, 27 juin 1994, transcript, Cour d'appel de Montpellier [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Fenton v. Morris, 28 juillet 1995, transcript, New Zealand District Court at Wellington [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 249].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
D.I. Petitioner [1999] Green's Family Law Reports 126, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 352

Le juge de première instance a estimé que le sens de l'expression « retour immédiat » dépendait des circonstances de l'espèce. Les parties convinrent que le délai initial de deux jours était trop court pour être réaliste et convinrent à la place d'un délai de 7 jours.

Il a également été noté qu'un retour immédiat pourrait ne plus s'avérer approprié lorsque des retards excessifs avaient suivi l'introduction de la procédure de retour :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] : près de 4 ans s'étaient écoulés depuis l'arrivée de l'enfant.

Patria Potestas

La notion de patria potestas, qui continue de jouer un rôle résiduel dans les États de langue espagnole a été interprétée par les juridictions de plusieurs États contractants comme un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Islande
M. v. K., 20/06/2000; Cour suprême d'Islande [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IS 363].

La violation du droit de patria potestas du père a été considérée comme rendant le déplacement illicite au sens de la Convention.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
La Court of Session, cour suprême écossaise, a également considéré qu'un déplacement intervenu en violation de la patria potestas du père constituait un déplacement illicite, voir : Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 117, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Dans la décision américaine Whallon v. Lynn, 230 F.3d 450 (1st Cir. October 27, 2000), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 388] le concept de patria potestas du droit mexicain a reçu une interprétation similaire.

Les décisions américaines Gil v. Rodriguez, 184 F.Supp.2d 1221 (M.D.Fla.2002), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 462], et

Vale v. Avila, 538 F.3d 581, (7th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 990] ont également donné la même interprétation au concept de patria potestas du droit vénézuélien.

Toutefois, dans l'affaire Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493], la cour d'appel fédérale américaine du 9e ressort a décidé que le père demandeur ne pouvait prétendre avoir un droit de garde sur le fondement du concept mexicain de patria potestas dans la mesure où la mère et lui avaient exécuté un accord formel de garde.

Nature et force de l'opposition

Australie
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 93]

La Cour suprême australienne s'est montrée partisane d'une interprétation littérale du terme « opposition ». Toutefois, cette position fut remise en cause par un amendement législatif :

s.111B(1B) of the Family Law Act 1975 introduit par la loi (Family Law Amendment Act) de 2000.

L'article 13(2), tel que mis en œuvre en droit australien par l'article 16(3) de la loi sur le droit de la famille (enlèvement d'enfant) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), prévoit désormais non seulement que l'enfant doit s'opposer à son retour mais également que cette opposition doit être d'une force qui dépasse la simple expression de préférence ou souhait ordinaires.

Voir par exemple :

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 904]

La question de savoir si un enfant doit spécifiquement s'opposer à son retour dans l'État de la résidence habituelle n'a pas été résolue. Voir :

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 864];

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (Austrian Supreme Court), 8/10/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 549].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Belgium
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/BE 546].

Le simple fait de préférer le pays d'accueil ne suffit pas à constituer une opposition.

Canada
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 1028].

Pour prouver qu'un enfant s'oppose à son retour, il faut démontrer que l'enfant « a exprimé un fort désaccord quant à son retour dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle. Son opposition doit être catégorique. Elle ne peut être établie en pesant simplement les avantages et les inconvénients des deux États concurrents, comme lors de la définition de l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant. Il doit s'agir de quelque de plus fort que la simple expression d'une préférence ». [traduction du Bureau Permanent]

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 87], la Cour d'appel a estimé que l'opposition au retour de la part de l'enfant doit porter sur le retour immédiat dans l'État dont il avait été enlevé. Rien dans l'article 13(2) ne justifie que l'opposition de l'enfant à rentrer dans toute circonstance soit prise en compte.

Dans Re M. (A Minor) (Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 56] il fut néanmoins admis qu'une opposition à la vie avec le parent demandeur pouvait être distinguée de l'opposition au retour dans l'État de résidence habituelle.

Dans Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270] le juge Ward L.J. formula une liste de questions destinées à guider l'analyse de la question de savoir si l'opposition de l'enfant devait être prise en compte.

Ces questions furent reprises par la Cour d'appel dans Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

Pour un commentaire sur ce point, voir: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

France
L'opposition fondée uniquement sur une préférence pour la vie en France ou la vie avec le parent ravisseur n'a pas été prise en compte. Voir :

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. v. F. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 274] ;

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 63].

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Dans Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 79] une interprétation large fut privilégiée, la Cour acceptant qu'une préférence forte pour la vie avec le parent ravisseur en Écosse revenait implicitement à une opposition à un retour aux États-Unis.

Dans W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 805] la Cour, qui avait suivi la liste de questions du juge Ward dans Re T. [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 270], décida que l'opposition concernant des questions de bien-être ne pouvait être prise en compte que par les autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant.

Dans une décision de première instance postérieure : M. Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 804], lady Smith observa qu'il y avait des divergences dans la jurisprudence rendue en appel et décida de suivre une jurisprudence antérieure, rejetant explicitement la méthode de Ward dans Re T.

Le juge souligna que la décision rendue en appel dans W. v. W. avait fait l'objet d'un recours devant la Chambre des Lords mais que l'affaire avait été résolue à l'amiable.

Plus récemment, une interprétation plus restrictive de l'opposition s'est fait jour, voir : C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 962] ; confirmé en appel par: C. v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996].

Suisse
La plus haute juridiction suisse a souligné qu'il était important que les enfants soient capables de distinguer la question du retour de la question de la garde, voir :

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 795] ;

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 894] ;

Le simple fait de préférer de vivre dans le pays d'accueil, même s'il est motivé, n'entre pas dans le cadre de l'article 13(2) :

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986].

Pour une analyse générale de la question, voir: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia,  2008).

Hechos

Las partes vivían en España. Se separaron en 1998 y se divorciaron en 1999. Sus dos hijos, de diez y trece años, vivían con la madre luego de la separación y el divorcio. La madre tenía algunos derechos de custodia, "custodia" y "cuidado", pero otros derechos de custodia, en particular, patria potestas, eran compartidos por ambos progenitores. La madre se llevó a los menores a Islandia en septiembre de 1999.

En noviembre de 1999, el padre solicitó la restitución de los menores a través de la Autoridad Central de España. El 19 de abril de 2000, el District Court (Tribunal de Distrito) de Reykjanes se negó a ordenar la restitución de los menores. La madre había expresado que tenía la custodia exclusiva y esto la autorizaba a decidir dónde residirían los menores.

El padre apeló ante la Supreme Court (Corte Suprema) de Islandia. Se otorgó el permiso de presentar evidencia adicional, incluido el informe de un psiquiatra con respecto a las opiniones del hijo menor y las declaraciones de un Juez español y de la Autoridad Central de España con respecto a legislación en materia de custodia de España.

Fallo

Apelación permitida y restitución ordenada; el traslado fue ilícito y no se probó ninguna de las excepciones en la medida exigida en virtud del Convenio.

Comentario INCADAT

Mientras que la legislación de Islandia tiene sólo un término para el concepto de custodia, el derecho español tiene: "Patria Potestad", "Guardia", "Custodia" y "Cuidado". En el marco del derecho de Islandia, los padres tienen la custodia conjunta o uno de ellos tiene la custodia exclusiva.

Restitución inmediata

Para los casos en que se establece que el traslado o retención del niño fue ilícito y han transcurrido 12 meses desde la fecha de iniciación del procedimiento de restitución, el artículo 12(1) prevé la restitución inmediata del niño. La intención es restablecer la situación previa a la sustracción lo antes posible. No obstante, pueden surgir preguntas en cuando a la modalidad de restitución y en cuanto a si debería otorgarse un tiempo de preparación o para permitir que el niño termine el ciclo lectivo. Las prácticas al respecto varían.

Estados Unidos de América
Sampson v. Sampson, 267 Kan. 175, 975 P.2d 1211 (Kan. App. 1999), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 226].

El tribunal de primera instancia dio a la madre 90 días para que se sometiera a la competencia de los tribunales israelíes.

En otros casos, el concepto de restitución "inmediata" de un menor trasladado o retenido ilícitamente ha sido interpretado de manera mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Francia
Procureur de la Rèpublique c. Bartège, 27 de junio de 1994, transcript, Tribunal de Apelaciones de Montpellier [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63];

Nueva Zelanda
Fenton v. Morris, 28 July 1995, transcript, New Zealand District Court at Wellington [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 249];

Reino Unido - Escocia
D.I. Petitioner [1999] Green's Family Law Reports 126, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 352].

El juez de primera instancia sostuvo que el significado del termino "restitución inmediata" depende de las circunstancias del caso. Las partes acordaron que el plazo de dos días acordado inicialmente era demasiado corto, por lo que en cambio acordaron una figura de siete días.

Asimismo, se ha destacado que puede que la restitución inmediata no sea apropiada cuando ha habido una demora excesiva desde el inicio del procedimiento de restitución:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [2007] 1 A.C. 619, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880] : habian transcurrido casi cuatro años desde la llegada del niño.

Patria potestad

Traducción en curso. - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa o francesa.

Naturaleza y tenor de la oposición

Australia
De L. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services (1996) FLC 92-706 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 93].

La máxima instancia de Australia (la High Court) adoptó una interpretación literal del término "objeción". Sin embargo, una reforma legislativa cambió la interpretacion posteriormente. Véase:

Art. 111B(1B) de la Ley de Derecho de Familia de 1975 (Family Law Act 1975) incorporada por la Ley de Reforma de Derecho de Familia de 2000 (Family Law Amendment Act 2000).

El artículo 13(2), incorporado al derecho australiano mediante la reg. 16(3) de las Regulaciones de Derecho de Familia (Sustracción de Menores) de 1989 (Family Law (Child Abduction) Regulations 1989), establece en la actualidad no solo que el menor debe oponerse a la restitución, sino que la objeción debe demostrar un sentimiento fuerte más allá de la mera expresión de una preferencia o simples deseos.

Véanse, por ejemplo:

Richards & Director-General, Department of Child Safety [2007] FamCA 65 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 904].

La cuestión acerca de si un menor debe plantear una objeción expresamente al Estado de residencia habitual no ha sido resuelta. Véase:

Re F. (Hague Convention: Child's Objections) [2006] FamCA 685 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 864].

Austria
9Ob102/03w, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 8/10/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 549].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Bélgica
N° de rôle: 02/7742/A, Tribunal de première instance de Bruxelles, 27/5/2003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/BE 546].

Una simple preferencia por el Estado de refugio no basta para constituir una objeción.

Canadá
Crnkovich v. Hortensius, [2009] W.D.F.L. 337, 62 R.F.L. (6th) 351, 2008 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 1028].

Para probar que un menor se opone a la restitución, ha de demostrarse que el menor "expresó un fuerte desacuerdo a regresar al pais de su residencia habitual. Su oposición ha de ser categórica. No puede determinarse simplemente pesando las ventajas y desventajas de los dos Estados en cuestión, como en el caso del análisis de su interés superior. Debe tratarse de algo más fuerte que de una mera expresión de preferencia".


Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En el caso Re S. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 242 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 87], el Tribunal de Apelaciones sostuvo que la restitución a la que un menor se opone debe ser una restitución inmediata al país del que fue ilícitamente sustraído. El artículo 13 no contiene disposición alguna que permita considerar si el menor se opone a la restitución en ciertas circunstancias.

En Re M. (A Minor)(Child Abduction) [1994] 1 FLR 390 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 56], se aceptó, sin embargo, que una objeción a la vida con el progenitor solicitante puede distinguirse de una objeción a la vida en el país de origen previo.

En Re T. (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2000] 2 FCR 159 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], Lord Justice Ward planteó una serie de preguntas a fin de ayudar a determinar si es adecuado tener en cuenta las objeciones de un menor.

Estas preguntas fueron respaldadas por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el marco del caso Re M. (A Child)(Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901].

Para comentarios académicos ver: P. McEleavy ‘Evaluating the Views of Abducted Children: Trends in Appellate Case Law' [2008] Child and Family Law Quarterly, pp. 230-254.

Francia
Las objeciones basadas exclusivamente en una preferencia por la vida en Francia o la vida con el padre sustractor no fueron admitidas, ver:

CA Grenoble 29/03/2000 M. c. F. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 274];

TGI Niort 09/01/1995, Procureur de la République c. Y. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 63].

Reino Unido - Escocia
En el caso Urness v. Minto 1994 SC 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs79], se adoptó una interpretación amplia. La Inner House of the Court of Session (tribunal de apelaciones) aceptó que una fuerte preferencia por permanecer con el padre sustractor y por la vida en Escocia implicaba una objeción a la restitución a los Estados Unidos de América.

En W. v. W. 2004 S.C. 63 IH (1 Div) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 805], la Inner House of the Court of Session, que aceptó el criterio inicial de Re T. [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 270], sostuvo que las objeciones relativas a cuestiones de bienestar debían ser tratadas exclusivamente por las autoridades del Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

En el posterior caso de primera instancia: M, Petitioner 2005 S.L.T. 2 OH [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 804], Lady Smith destacó la división en la jurisprudencia de apelación y decidió seguir la línea de autoridad previa ejemplificada en Urness v. Minto. Rechazó expresamente los criterios iniciales de Re T.

La jueza dejó asentado en su sentencia que habría habido un intento de impugnar la sentencia de la Inner House of the Court of Session en W. v. W. ante la Cámara de los Lores pero que el caso se había resuelto en forma amigable.

Más recientemente, se ha seguido un enfoque más estricto en cuanto a las objeciones, ver: C. v. C. [2008] CSOH 42, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 962]; ratificado en instancia de apelación: C v. C. [2008] CSIH 34, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996].

Suiza
El máximo tribunal suizo ha resaltado la importancia de que los menores sean capaces de distinguir entre las cuestiones vinculadas a la custodia y las cuestiones vinculadas a la restitución. Véanse:

5P.1/2005 /bnm, Bundesgericht II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 795];

5P.3/2007 /bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 894].

La mera preferencia por la vida en el Estado de refugio, incluso motivada, no satisfará los términos del artículo 13(2):

5A.582/2007, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986].

Para comentarios académicos generales, véase: R. Schuz ‘Protection or Autonomy -The Child Abduction Experience' in  Y. Ronen et al. (eds), The Case for the Child- Towards the Construction of a New Agenda,  271-310 (Intersentia, 2008).