CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Dellabarca v. Christie [1999] NZFLR 97

INCADAT reference

HC/E/AU 295

Court

Country

NEW ZEALAND

Name

Court of Appeal

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Henry, Keith and Tipping JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

NEW ZEALAND

Requested State

AUSTRALIA

Decision

Date

18 December 1998

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Appeal dismissed, refusal of Article 15 declaration confirmed

HC article(s) Considered

3 5 15 19

HC article(s) Relied Upon

5 15

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 2 All ER 465; C. v. S. (Minor: Abduction: Illegitimate Child) [1990] 2 All ER 961; G. v. B. [1995] 1 NZLR 569; McCall v. McCall and State Central Authority (Applicant) and Attorney General of the Commonwealth (Intervener) (1995) FLC 92-551; Overall Conclusions of the Special Commission of October 1989 on the Operation of the Convention; Elisa Pérez-Vera, Explanatory Report on the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Convention Aims
Convention Aims
General Approach to Interpretation
Autonomous Concepts

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?
Article 15 Decision or Determination

Exceptions to Return

Grave Risk of Harm
Primary Carer Abductions
Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Implementation & Application Issues

Measures to Facilitate the Return of Children
Safe Return / Mirror Orders
Undertakings

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a boy, was 2 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. He had lived in New Zealand all of his life. The parents were not married.

On 10 November 1995 a Family Court appointed counselor facilitated an agreement between the parents whereby the mother would have custody and the father weekly access. On 22 November 1995 the mother took the child to Australia. The father petitioned for the return of the child.

Subsequently the Australian Central Authority applied to the New Zealand Family Court for an Article 15 declaration. A declaration was granted stating that the removal was wrongful. The mother appealed to the High Court.

The High Court allowed the mother's appeal, finding that the rights in the agreement did not amount to rights of custody and secondly that the agreement did not in any event have legal effect. The father appealed to the Court of Appeal.

Ruling

Appeal dismissed; the removal was not wrongful as the father did not enjoy any legal rights of custody.

INCADAT comment

Convention Aims

Courts in all Contracting States must inevitably make reference to and evaluate the aims of the Convention if they are to understand the purpose of the instrument, and so be guided in how its concepts should be interpreted and provisions applied.

The 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, explicitly and implicitly, embodies a range of aims and objectives, positive and negative, as it seeks to achieve a delicate balance between the competing interests of the central actors; the child, the left behind parent and the abducting parent, see for example the discussion in the decision of the Canadian Supreme Court: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 17].

Article 1 identifies the core aims, namely that the Convention seeks:
"a) to secure the prompt return of children wrongfully removed to or retained in any Contracting State; and
 b) to ensure that rights of custody and of access under the law of one Contracting State are effectively respected in the other Contracting States."

Further clarification, most notably to the primary purpose of achieving the return of children where their removal or retention has led to the breach of actually exercised rights of custody, is given in the Preamble.

Therein it is recorded that:

"the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody;

and that States signatory desire:

 to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention;

 to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence; and

 to secure protection for rights of access."

The aim of return and the manner in which it should best be achieved is equally reinforced in subsequent Articles, notably in the duties required of Central Authorities (Arts 8-10) and in the requirement for judicial authorities to act expeditiously (Art. 11).

Article 13, along with Articles 12(2) and 20, which contain the exceptions to the summary return mechanism, indicate that the Convention embodies an additional aim, namely that in certain defined circumstances regard may be paid to the specific situation, including the best interests, of the individual child or even taking parent.

The Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report draws (at para. 19) attention to an implicit aim on which the Convention rests, namely that any debate on the merits of custody rights should take place before the competent authorities in the State where the child had his habitual residence prior to its removal, see for example:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 362]
 
Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 839]

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 214]

Netherlands
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 316]

Switzerland
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 986]

United Kingdom - Scotland
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 996]

United States of America
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 125]
 
The Pérez-Vera Report equally articulates the preventive dimension to the instrument's return aim (at paras. 17, 18, 25), a goal which was specifically highlighted during the ratification process of the Convention in the United States (see: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) and which has subsequently been relied upon in that Contracting State when applying the Convention, see:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 741]

Applying the principle of equitable tolling where an abducted child had been concealed was held to be consistent with the purpose of the Convention to deter child abduction.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578]

In contrast to other federal Courts of Appeals, the 11th Circuit was prepared to interpret a ne exeat right as including the right to determine a child's place of residence since the goal of the Hague Convention was to deter international abduction and the ne exeat right provided a parent with decision-making authority regarding the child's international relocation.

In other jurisdictions, deterrence has on occasion been raised as a relevant factor in the interpretation and application of the Convention, see for example:

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 754]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 50]

Aims and objectives may equally rise to prominence during the life of the instrument, such as the promotion of transfrontier contact, which it has been submitted will arise by virtue of a strict application of the Convention's summary return mechanism, see:

New Zealand
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 296]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 60]

There is no hierarchy between the different aims of the Convention (Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report, at para. 18).  Judicial interpretation may therefore differ as between Contracting States as more or less emphasis is placed on particular objectives.  Equally jurisprudence may evolve, whether internally or internationally.

In United Kingdom case law (England and Wales) a decision of that jurisdiction's then supreme jurisdiction, the House of Lords, led to a reappraisal of the Convention's aims and consequently a re-alignment in court practice as regards the exceptions:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Previously a desire to give effect to the primary goal of promoting return and thereby preventing an over-exploitation of the exceptions, had led to an additional test of exceptionality being added to the exceptions, see for example:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 901]

It was this test of exceptionality which was subsequently held to be unwarranted by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

- Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine:

In United States Convention case law different approaches have been taken in respect of applicants who have or are alleged to have themselves breached court orders under the "fugitive disentitlement doctrine".

In Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 150], the fugitive disentitlement doctrine was applied, the applicant father in the Convention application having left the United States to escape his criminal conviction and other responsibilities to the United States courts.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 326]

In the instant case the father was a fugitive. Secondly, it was arguable there was some connection between his fugitive status and the petition. But the court found that the connection not to be strong enough to support the application of the doctrine. In any event, the court also held that applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine would impose too severe a sanction in a case involving parental rights.

In March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 386], the doctrine was not applied where the applicant was in breach of civil orders.

In the Canadian case Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 760], the father's fugitive status was held to be a factor in there being a grave risk of harm facing the child.

Author: Peter McEleavy

Autonomous Concepts

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The Role and Interpretation of Article 15

Article 15 is an innovative mechanism which reflects the cooperation which is central to the 1980 Hague Convention.  It provides that the authorities of a Contracting State may, prior to making a return order, request that the applicant obtain from the authorities of the child's State of habitual residence a decision or other determination that the removal or retention was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention, where such a decision or determination may be obtained in that State. The Central Authorities of the Contracting States shall so far as practicable assist applicants to obtain such a decision or determination.

Scope of the Article 15 Decision or Determination Mechanism

Common law jurisdictions are divided as to the role to be played by the Article 15 mechanism, in particular whether the court in the child's State of habitual residence should make a finding as to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention, or, whether it should limit its decision to the extent to which the applicant possesses custody rights under its own law.  This division cannot be dissociated from the autonomous nature of custody rights for Convention purposes as well as that of 'wrongfulness' i.e. when rights of custody are to be deemed to have been breached.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal favoured a very strict position with regard to the scope of Article 15:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court held that where the question for determination in the requested State turned on a point of autonomous Convention law (e.g. wrongfulness) then it would be difficult to envisage any circumstances in which an Article 15 request would be worthwhile.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866].

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Whilst there was unanimity as to the utility and binding nature of a ruling of a foreign court as to the content of the rights held by an applicant, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, further specified that the foreign court would additionally be much better placed than the English court to understand the true meaning and effect of its own laws in Convention terms.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

A majority in the Court of Appeal, approving of the position adopted by the English Court of Appeal in Hunter v. Morrow, held that a court seised of an Article 15 decision or determination should restrict itself to reporting on matters of national law and not stray into the classification of a removal as being wrongful or not; the latter was exclusively a matter for the court in the State of refuge in the light of its assessment of the autonomous law of the Convention. 

Status of an Article 15 Decision or Determination

The status to be accorded to an Article 15 decision or determination has equally generated controversy, in particular the extent to which a foreign ruling should be determinative as regards the existence, or inexistence, of custody rights and in relation to the issue of wrongfulness.

Australia
In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

The court noted that a decision or determination under Article 15 was persuasive only and that it was ultimately a matter for the French courts to decide whether there had been a wrongful removal.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court of Appeal held that an Article 15 decision or determination was not binding and it rejected the determination of wrongfulness made by the New Zealand High Court: M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1021]. In so doing it noted that New Zealand courts did not recognise the sharp distinction between rights of custody and rights of access which had been accepted in the United Kingdom.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

The Court of Appeal declined to accept the finding of the Romanian courts that the father did not have rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

The House of Lords held unanimously that where an Article 15 decision or determination was sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling had been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice. Such circumstances were absent in the present case, therefore the trial court and the Court of Appeal had erred in disregarding the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal and in allowing fresh evidence to be adduced.

As regards the characterisation of the parent's rights, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, held that it would only be where this was clearly out of line with the international understanding of the Convention's terms, as might well have been the case in Hunter v. Murrow, should the court in the requested state decline to follow it. For his part Lord Brown affirmed that the determination of content and classification by the foreign court should almost invariably be treated as conclusive.

Switzerland
5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953].

The Swiss supreme court held that a finding on custody rights would in principle bind the authorities in the requested State.  As regards an Article 15 decision or determination, the court noted that commentators were divided as to the effect in the requested State and it declined to make a finding on the issue.

Practical Implications of Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Recourse to the Article 15 mechanism will inevitably lead to delay in the conduct of a return petition, particularly should there happen to be an appeal against the original determination by the authorities in the State of habitual residence. See for example:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

This practical reality has in turn generated a wide range of judicial views.

In Re D. a variety of opinions were canvassed. Lord Carswell affirmed that resort to the procedure should be kept to a minimum. Lord Brown noted that it would only be used on rare occasions. Lord Hope counselled against seeking perfection in ascertaining whether a removal or retention was wrongful, rather a balance had to be struck between acting on too little information and searching for too much. Baroness Hale noted that when a country first acceded to the Convention Article 15 might be useful in cases of doubt to obtain an authoritative ruling on the content and effect of the local law.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

The majority in the Court of Appeal, suggested that Article 15 requests should only rarely be made as between Australia and New Zealand, given the similarities of the legal systems.

Alternatives to Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Whilst courts may simply wish to determine the foreign law in the light of the available information, an alternative is to seek expert evidence.  Experience in England and Wales has shown that this is far from fool-proof and does not necessarily result in time being saved, see: 

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1020].

In the latter case Thorpe L.J. suggested that greater recourse could be made to the European Judicial Network, through the International Family Law Office at the Royal Courts of Justice. Pragmatic advice could be offered as to the best route to follow in a particular case: whether to go for a single joint expert; whether to go for an Article 15 decision or determination; or whether to go for an opinion from the liaison judge as to the law of his own country, an opinion that would not be binding but which would perhaps help the parties and the trial court to see the weight, or want of weight, in the challenge to the plaintiff's ability to cross the Article 3 threshold.

Primary Carer Abductions

The issue of how to respond when a taking parent who is a primary carer threatens not to accompany a child back to the State of habitual residence if a return order is made, is a controversial one.

There are examples from many Contracting States where courts have taken a very strict approach so that, other than in exceptional situations, the Article 13(1)(b) exception has not been upheld where the non-return argument has been raised, see:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 764]

In this case, a non-return order was made since the facts were exceptional. There had been a genuine threat to the mother, which had put her quite obviously and rightfully in fear for her safety if she returned to Israel. The mother was taken to Israel on false pretences, sold to the Russian Mafia and re-sold to the father who forced her into prostitution. She was locked in, beaten by the father, raped and threatened. The mother was genuinely in a state of fear and could not be expected to return to Israel. It would be wholly inappropriate to send the child back without his mother to a father who had been buying and selling women and running a prostitution business.

United Kingdom - England and Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 269]

However, in a more recent English Court of Appeal judgment, the C. v. C. approach has been refined:

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 469]

In this case, it was ruled that a mother's refusal to return was capable of amounting to a defence because the refusal was not an act of unreasonableness, but came about as a result of an illness she was suffering from. It may be noted, however, that a return order was nevertheless still made. In this context reference may also be made to the decisions of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1068] and Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 1147], in which it was accepted that the anxieties of a respondent mother about return, which were not based upon objective risk to her but nevertheless were of such intensity as to be likely, in the event of a return, to destabilise her parenting of the child to the point at which the child's situation would become intolerable, could in principle meet the threshold of the Article 13(1)(b) exception.

Germany
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Previously a much more liberal interpretation had been adopted:
Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 323]

Switzerland
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 1179]

New Zealand
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 770]

United Kingdom - Scotland
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 26]

United States of America
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USs 97]

In other Contracting States, the approach taken with regard to non-return arguments has varied:

Australia
In Australia, early Convention case law exhibited a very strict approach adopted with regard to non-return arguments, see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 293]
 
In State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AU 283], the Family Court of Australia at Melbourne did find the grave risk of harm exception to be established where the mother would not return, but in this case the mother had been denied entry into the United States of America, the child's State of habitual residence.

Following the judgment of the High Court of Australia (the highest court in the Australian judicial system) in the joint appeals DP v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 346, 347], greater attention has been focused on the post-return situation facing abducted children.

In the context of a primary-carer taking parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence see: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/AU 544]. 

France
In French case law, a permissive approach to Article 13(1)(b) has been replaced with a much more restrictive interpretation. For examples of the initial approach, see:

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 498]

And for examples of the stricter interpretation, see:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [INCADAT Reference HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
In Israeli case law there are contrasting examples of the judicial response to non-return arguments:
 
Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 832]

in contrast with:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 833]

Poland
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 700]

The Supreme Court noted that it would not be in the child's best interests if she were deprived of her mother's care, were the latter to choose to remain in Poland. However, it equally affirmed that if the child were to stay in Poland it would not be in her interests to be deprived of the care of her father. For these reasons, the Court concluded that it could not be assumed that ordering the return of the child would place her in an intolerable situation.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/PL 701]

The Supreme Court specified that the frequently used argument of the child's potential separation from the taking parent, did not, in principle, justify the application of the exception. It held that where there were no objective obstacles to the return of a taking parent, then it could be assumed that the taking parent considered his own interest to be more important than those of the child.

The Court added that a taking parent's fear of being held criminally liable was not an objective obstacle to return, as the taking parent should have been aware of the consequences of his actions. The situation with regard to infants was however more complicated. The Court held that the special bond between mother and baby only made their separation possible in exceptional cases, and this was so even if there were no objective obstacles to the mother's return to the State of habitual residence. The Court held that where the mother of an infant refused to return, whatever the reason, then the return order should be refused on the basis of Article 13(1)(b). On the facts, return was ordered.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UY 1185]

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)
There are decisions of the ECrtHR which have endorsed a strict approach with regard to the compatibility of Hague Convention exceptions and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Some of these cases have considered arguments relevant to the issue of grave risk of harm, including where an abductor has indicated an unwillingness to accompany the returning child, see:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1169]

In this case, the ECrtHR upheld a challenge by the left-behind father that the refusal of the Turkish courts to return his child led to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The ECrtHR stated that whilst very young age was a criterion to be taken into account to determine the child's interest in an abduction case, it could not be considered by itself a sufficient ground, in relation to the requirements of the Hague Convention, to justify dismissal of a return application.

Recourse has been had to expert evidence to assist in ascertaining the potential consequences of the child being separated from the taking parent

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1177]

However, it must equally be noted that since the Grand Chamber ruling in Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, there are examples of a less strict approach being followed. The latter ruling had emphasised the best interests of the individual abducted child in the context of an application for return and the ascertainment of whether the domestic courts had conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation as well as a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, see:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1146]; and Grand Chamber ruling X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1171]

In this case, a majority found that the return of a child to the United States of America would lead to a breach of Article 8 of the ECHR. The decision-making process of the Belgian Appellate Court as regards Article 13(1)(b) was held not to have met the procedural requirements inherent in Article 8 of the ECHR. The two dissenting judges noted, however, that the danger referred to in Article 13 should not consist only of the separation of the child from the taking parent.

(Author: Peter McEleavy, April 2013)

Australian and New Zealand Case Law

Australia
In Australia a very strict approach was adopted initially with regard to Article 13(1) b), see:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @294@];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU @293@].

However, following the judgment of the High Court in the joint appeals:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @346@, @347@], where a literal interpretation of the exception was advocated, greater attention has now been focused on the risk to the child and the post return situation. 

In the context of a primary carer abducting parent refusing to return to the child's State of habitual residence, see:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @544@].

With regard to a child facing a grave risk of psychological harm see:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 871].

For recent examples of cases where the grave risk of harm exception was rejected see:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [INCADAT cite HC/E/AU @782@].

New Zealand
Appellate authority initially indicated that the change in emphasis adopted in Australia with regard to Article 13(1) b) would be followed in New Zealand also, see:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 495].

However, in the more recent decision: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 770] the High Court of New Zealand (Auckland) has affirmed, albeit obiter, that the binding interpretation in New Zealand remained the strict interpretation given by the Court of Appeal in:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 90].

Safe Return / Mirror Orders

A practice has arisen in a number of Contracting States for return orders to be made subject to compliance with certain specified requirements or undertakings. To ensure that such protective measures are enforceable, the applicant may be required to have these measures registered in identical or equivalent terms in the child's State of habitual residence. These replica orders are commonly referred to as ‘safe return' or ‘mirror orders'.

Return orders have been made subject to the enactment of safe return /mirror orders in the following jurisdictions:

Australia
Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWHC 1247, [2004] 2 FLR 499  [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ UKe 599];

Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 982];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

A request by the English High Court for protective measures ancillary to an order for international contact to be registered in the State of visitation was upheld by the Panama Second Court of Childhood and Adolescence, see:

Ruling Nº393-05-F, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/PA 872].

A request that a return order be made subject to the implementation of mirror orders was turned down in:

Israel 
Family Application 8743/07 Y.D.G. v T.G., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 983].

The Jerusalem Family Court ruled that since accusations against the father had not been upheld there was no basis to impose conditions to ensure the children's safety, other than deposit of money to secure the father's undertaking that they could live in his apartment. There was no need to obtain a mirror order from the US courts as the delay in so doing would harm the children.

Undertakings

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de 2 ans à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait vécu toute sa vie en Nouvelle-Zélande. Les parents n'étaient pas mariés.

Le 10 novembre 1995, le juge aux affaires familiales désigna un conseiller afin de faciliter la recherche d'un accord entre les parties aux termes duquel la mère aurait la garde et le père un droit de visite hebdomadaire. Le 22 novembre 1995, la mère emmena l'enfant en Australie. Le père demanda le retour de l'enfant.

A la suite de cette demande, l'Autorité centrale australienne saisit le juge aux affaires familiales de Nouvelle-Zélande en vue d'une déclaration de l'article 15. La déclaration fut faite selon laquelle le déplacement était illicite. La mère forma un recours devant la High Court.

La High Court accueillit le recours de la mère estimant que les droits conférés par l'accord au père ne constituaient pas un droit de garde et que l'accord intervenu était absolument dépourvu de tout effet juridique. Le père forma un recours devant la juridiction suprême (Court of Appeal).

Dispositif

Le recours a été rejeté ; le déplacement n'était pas illicite dès lors que le père ne jouissait d'aucun droit de garde.

Commentaire INCADAT

Objectifs de la Convention

Les juridictions de tous les États contractants doivent inévitablement se référer aux objectifs de la Convention et les évaluer si elles veulent comprendre le but de cet instrument et être ainsi guidées quant à la manière d'interpréter ses notions et d'appliquer ses dispositions.

La Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants comprend explicitement et implicitement toute une série de buts et d'objectifs, positifs et négatifs, car elle cherche à établir un équilibre délicat entre les intérêts concurrents des principaux acteurs : l'enfant, le parent délaissé et le parent ravisseur. Voir, par exemple, le débat sur cette question dans la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 17].

L'article 1 identifie les principaux objectifs, à savoir que la Convention a pour objet :
a) d'assurer le retour immédiat des enfants déplacés ou retenus illicitement dans tout État contractant et
b) de faire respecter effectivement dans les autres États contractants les droits de garde et de visite existant dans un État contractant.

De plus amples détails sont fournis dans le préambule, notamment au sujet de l'objectif premier d'obtenir le retour des enfants, lorsque leur déplacement ou leur rétention a donné lieu à une violation des droits de garde effectivement exercés.  Il y est indiqué que :

L'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ;

Et les États signataires désirant :
protéger l'enfant, sur le plan international, contre tous les effets nuisibles d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour illicites et établir des procédures en vue de garantir le retour immédiat de l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle et d'assurer la protection du droit de visite.

L'objectif du retour et la manière dont il doit s'effectuer au mieux sont également renforcés dans les articles suivants, notamment en ce qui concerne les obligations des Autorités centrales (art. 8 à 10) et l'obligation faite aux autorités judiciaires de procéder d'urgence (art. 11).

L'article 13, avec les articles 12(2) et 20, qui énonce les exceptions au mécanisme de retour sommaire, indique que la Convention comporte un objectif supplémentaire, à savoir que dans certaines circonstances définies, la situation propre à chaque enfant devrait être prise en compte, notamment l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant ou même du parent ayant emmené l'enfant. 

Le rapport explicatif de Mme Pérez-Vera attire l'attention au paragraphe 9 sur un objectif implicite sur lequel repose la Convention, à savoir que l'examen au fond des questions relatives aux droits de garde doit se faire par les autorités compétentes de l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle avant d'être déplacé, voir par exemple :

Argentine
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 362];

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 January 2007, No 06/002739, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

Israël
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 214];

Pays-Bas
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 316];

Suisse
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125].

Le rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera associe également la dimension préventive à l'objectif de retour de l'instrument (para. 17, 18 et 25), un objectif dont il a beaucoup été question pendant le processus de ratification de la Convention aux États-Unis d'Amérique (voir : Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) et sur lequel des juges se sont fondés dans cet État contractant dans leur application de la Convention. Voir :

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1023].

Le fait d'appliquer le principe d'« equitable tolling » lorsqu'un enfant enlevé a été dissimulé a été considéré comme cohérent avec l'objectif de la Convention de décourager l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

À l'inverse des autres instances d'appel fédérales, le tribunal du 11e ressort était prêt à interpréter un droit ne exeat comme incluant le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, étant donné que le but de la Convention de La Haye est de prévenir l'enlèvement international et que le droit ne exeat donne au parent le pouvoir de décider du pays où l'enfant prendrait résidence.

Dans d'autres juridictions, la prévention a parfois été invoquée comme facteur pertinent dans l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention. Voir par exemple :

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni  - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50].

Des buts et objectifs de la Convention peuvent également se trouver au centre de l'attention pendant la vie de l'instrument, comme la promotion du contact transfrontière, qui, selon des arguments avancés en ce sens, découlent d'une application stricte du mécanisme de retour sommaire de la Convention, voir :

Nouvelle-Zélande
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 296];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60].

Il n'y a pas de hiérarchie entre les différents objectifs de la Convention (para. 18 du rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera). L'interprétation judiciaire peut ainsi diverger selon les États contractants en fonction de l'accent plus ou moins important qui sera placé sur certains objectifs. La jurisprudence peut également évoluer, sur le plan interne ou international.

Dans la jurisprudence britannique du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), une décision de l'instance suprême de cette juridiction, la Chambre des lords, a donné lieu à une ré-évaluation des objectifs de la Convention et, partant, à un réalignement de la pratique judiciaire en ce qui concerne les exceptions :

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Précédemment, la volonté de donner effet à l'objectif premier d'encourager le retour et de prévenir ainsi un recours abusif aux exceptions, avait donné lieu à l'ajout d'un critère additionnel du « caractère exceptionnel », voir par exemple :

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

C'est ce critère du caractère exceptionnel qui fut par la suite considéré comme non fondé par la Chambre des lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, des approches différentes ont été suivies dans la jurisprudence de la Convention à l'égard de demandeurs qui n'ont pas ou n'auraient pas respecté une décision de justice en vertu de la « doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif ».

Dans Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 150], la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif a été appliquée, le père demandeur ayant fui les États-Unis pour échapper à sa condamnation pénale et d'autres responsabilités devant des tribunaux américains.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. 2000), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 326].

Dans l'espèce, le père était un fugitif. Deuxièmement, on pouvait soutenir qu'il y avait un lien entre son statut de fugitif et la demande. Mais la juridiction conclut que le lien n'était pas assez fort pour que la doctrine ait à s'appliquer. En tout état de cause, la juridiction estima également que le fait d'appliquer la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif imposerait une sanction trop sévère dans une affaire de droits parentaux.

Dans March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 386], la doctrine n'a pas été appliquée pour ce qui est du non-respect par le demandeur d'ordonnances civiles.

Dans l'affaire canadienne Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 760], le statut de fugitif du père a été considéré comme un facteur à prendre en compte, en ce sens qu'il y avait là un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant.

Concepts autonomes

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15

Rôle et interprétation de l’article 15

L’article 15 constitue un mécanisme innovant qui traduit la coopération, élément central au fonctionnement de la Convention Enlèvement d’enfants de 1980. Cet article prévoit la possibilité pour les autorités d’un État contractant, avant de déposer une demande de retour, d’exiger que le demandeur obtienne, le cas échéant, de la part des autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant, une décision ou autre attestation constatant le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non‑retour de l’enfant au sens de l’article 3 de la Convention. Les Autorités centrales des États contractants doivent, dans la mesure du possible, aider les demandeurs à obtenir cette décision ou attestation.

Portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 aux fins d’obtention de décisions ou d’attestations

Les États de tradition de common law sont divisés quant au rôle du mécanisme de l’article 15. Ils s’interrogent en particulier quant à la nature de la décision ; le tribunal de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant doit-il statuer sur le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ou se contenter d’établir si le demandeur est bel et bien titulaire du droit de garde en vertu du droit interne ? Cette distinction est indissociable de l’interprétation autonome du droit de garde et du caractère « illicite » aux fins de la Convention, autrement dit estime-t-on que le droit de garde a été violé.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d’appel s’est prononcée en faveur d’une position très stricte quant à la portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 :

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour a conclu qu’il était difficile d’envisager des circonstances dans lesquelles une demande aux fins de l’article 15 peut avoir une quelconque utilité, si la demande d’attestation dans l’État requis a trait à un point d’interprétation autonome de la Convention (par ex., le caractère illicite).

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 866].

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Si l’utilité et le caractère contraignant d’une décision d’un tribunal étranger portant sur l’étendue des droits du demandeur ont fait l’unanimité, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a insisté sur le fait que le tribunal étranger était bien mieux placé qu’un tribunal anglais pour comprendre les véritables signification et effet de ses propres lois aux termes de la Convention.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

Se ralliant à la décision de la Cour d’appel anglaise dans l’affaire Hunter v. Morrow, la Cour d’appel néo-zélandaise a conclu, à la majorité, qu’un tribunal saisit d’une demande de décision ou d’attestation aux fins de l’article 15 devrait se contenter de consigner les questions relevant du droit national et ne pas s’aventurer à classer le déplacement comme illicite ou non. Ce dernier point relève exclusivement de la compétence des tribunaux de l’État de refuge, compte tenu de l’interprétation autonome de la Convention.

Statut d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le statut qu’il convient d’accorder à une décision ou attestation de l’article 15 s’est également révélé source de controverse, en particulier eu égard à la nature ou non probante d’une décision étrangère eu égard à l’existence ou non du droit de garde et quant au caractère illicite.

Australie

In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

La Cour a estimé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était qu’indicative et qu’il appartenait aux tribunaux français de déterminer si le déplacement était illicite.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour d’appel a jugé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était pas probante et a réfuté les conclusions de la Haute Cour néo-zélandaise quant au caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour : M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1021]. Ce faisant, elle a indiqué que les tribunaux néo-zélandais ne reconnaissaient pas la distinction entre les droits de garde et d’accès, distinction admise au Royaume-Uni.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866].

La Cour d’appel a refusé les conclusions des tribunaux roumains indiquant que le père ne disposait pas du droit de garde en vertu de la Convention.

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

La Chambre des Lords a conclu à l’unanimité qu’en cas de demande de décision ou d’attestation en vertu de l’article 15, la décision du tribunal étranger quant à l’étendue du droit du demandeur doit être, sauf circonstances exceptionnelles (par ex. si la décision résulte d’une fraude ou viole les principes élémentaires de justice), considérée comme probante. Il n’existait en l’espèce aucune circonstance exceptionnelle, le tribunal de première instance et la Cour d’appel ont dont commis une erreur en ne tenant pas compte de la décision de la Cour d’appel de Bucarest et en autorisant la production de nouvelles preuves.

Pour ce qui est de la détermination des droits du parent, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a estimé que le tribunal de l’État requis pouvait refuser de s’y conformer, uniquement lorsque cette détermination est clairement contraire à l’interprétation internationale de la Convention, comme cela a pu être le cas dans l’affaire Hunter v. Murrow. Pour sa part, Lord Brown a jugé que la détermination des droits et du caractère illicite devait, en toutes circonstances, être jugée probante.

Suisse

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953].

La Cour suprême suisse a jugé qu’une conclusion quant au droit de garde serait, en principe, contraignante pour les autorités de l’État requis. Pour ce qui est des décisions ou attestations de l’article 15, la Cour a indiqué que les avis parmi les commentateurs étaient partagés quant à leurs effets et a refusé de se prononcer sur la question.

Conséquences pratiques d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le recours au mécanisme de l’article 15 provoquera inéluctablement des retards dans le cadre de la demande de retour, en particulier lorsque la décision ou attestation d’origine fait l’objet d’un appel interjeté par les autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle. Voir par exemple :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Cette réalité pratique a à son tour généré une grande quantité d’opinions de juges.

L’affaire Re D. a suscité de nombreuses opinions. Lord Carswell a affirmé qu’il conviendrait de limiter au minimum le recours à cette procédure. Lord Brown a indiqué qu’un tel mécanisme ne serait utilisé qu’à de rares occasions. Lord Hope a conseillé d’éviter de rechercher la perfection dans l’examen du caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ; il conviendrait selon lui d’établir un juste milieu entre le fait d’agir sur base d’informations trop faibles et d’en solliciter trop. La Baronne Hale a indiqué qu’en cas d’adhésion récente d’un État à la Convention, l’article 15 pouvait, en cas de doute, s’avérer utile aux fins d’obtention d’une décision contraignante sur le contenu et les effets du droit local.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

La Cour d’appel a, à la majorité, estimé que les demandes au titre de l’article 15 ne devraient être utilisées que très rarement entre l’Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande, compte tenu de la similarité de ces deux ordres juridiques.

Solutions alternatives à une demande aux fins de l’article 15

Dans les cas où les tribunaux souhaitent simplement établir quel est le droit étranger à la lumière des informations disponibles, le recours à un expert en la matière peut apparaître comme une solution de rechange. L’expérience en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles a montré que cette méthode est loin d’être infaillible et qu’elle ne permet pas toujours de gagner du temps, voir :

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1020].

Dans ce dernier cas, le juge Thorpe a émis l’avis que l’on pourrait plus souvent recourir au Réseau judiciaire européen, par l’intermédiaire du Bureau international du droit de la famille au sein de la Royal Courts of Justice. Des conseils pratiques pourraient ainsi être émis quant à la meilleure marche à suivre dans un cas particulier : recourir conjointement à un unique expert ; solliciter une décision ou attestation en vertu de l’article 15 ; solliciter l’opinion d’un juge de liaison concernant le droit de son État, opinion qui ne serait pas contraignante mais qui pourrait aider les parties et le tribunal à distinguer le poids des arguments ou des intentions dans la contestation de la faculté du plaignant à remplir les conditions établies à l’article 3.

Enlèvements par le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant

La question de la position à adopter dans les situations où le parent ravisseur est le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, et qu'il menace de ne pas rentrer avec l'enfant dans l'État de résidence habituelle si une ordonnance de retour est rendue, est controversée.

De nombreux États contractants ont adopté une position très stricte au terme de laquelle le jeu de l'exception prévue à l'article 13(1)(b) n'a été retenu que dans des circonstances exceptionnelles quand l'argument tendant au non-retour de l'enfant était invoqué. Voir :

Autriche
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canada
M.G. v. R.F., 2002 R.J.Q. 2132 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., 1999 R.D.F. 38 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

Dans cette affaire, les circonstances exceptionnelles ont résulté en une ordonnance de non-retour. La mère faisait face à une menace véritable qui lui faisait craindre légitimement pour sa sécurité si elle retournait en Israël. Elle avait été emmenée en Israël sous un faux prétexte, y avait été vendue à la mafia russe puis revendue au père, qui l'avait forcée à se prostituer. Elle avait alors été enfermée, battue par le père, violée et menacée. La mère était dans un réel état de peur, on ne pouvait attendre d'elle qu'elle retourne en Israël. Il aurait été complètement inapproprié de renvoyer l'enfant sans sa mère vers un père qui avait acheté et vendu des femmes, et dirigé des activités de prostitution.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

Toutefois, dans un jugement plus récent rendu par une Cour d'appel anglaise, la position adoptée en 1989 dans l'affaire C. v. C. fut précisée. Voir :

Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] 3 FCR 43, [2002] EWCA Civ 908 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469]

Dans cette affaire, il fut décidé que le refus de la mère de retourner dans l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle était susceptible de déclencher le jeu de l'exception en ce qu'il n'était pas imputable à un comportement excessif mais à une maladie dont elle souffrait. Il convient de noter qu'une ordonnance de retour fut malgré tout rendue. On peut également mentionner à ce sujet les décisions de la Cour Suprême du Royaume-Uni dans Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] et Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. Dans cette dernière affaire, il fut accepté que les angoisses d'une mère concernant son retour satisfaisaient le niveau de risque requis à l'article 13(1)(b) et justifiaient le jeu de cette exception quoiqu'elles n'étaient pas fondées sur un risque objectif. L'ampleur de ces angoisses était telle qu'elles lui auraient probablement causé des difficultés à assumer normalement son rôle de parent en cas de retour, au point de rendre la situation de l'enfant intolérable.

Allemagne
Oberlandesgericht Dresden, 10 UF 753/01, 21 January 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

Oberlandesgericht Köln, 21 UF 70/01, 12 April 2001 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Auparavant, une position beaucoup plus libérale avait été adoptée :

Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart, 17 UF 260/98, 25 November 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suisse
5P_71/2003/min, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 27 mars 2003 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P_65/2002/bnm, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 11 avril 2002 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P_367/2005/ast, II. Zivilabteilung, arrêt du TF du 15 novembre 2005 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007/frs, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 16 août 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil, arrêt du TF du 13 juillet 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nouvelle-Zélande
K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Etats-Unis d'Amérique
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct., 1997) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position adoptée quant aux arguments tendant au non-retour de l'enfant a varié :

Australie
En Australie, la jurisprudence ancienne témoigne d'une position initialement très stricte. Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

Dans l'affaire State Central Authority v. Ardito, 20 October 1997 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], le Tribunal de Melbourne avait estimé qu'il y avait bien un risque grave de danger alors que la mère refusait de rentrer avec l'enfant. En l'espèce, toutefois, la mère ne pouvait pas retourner aux États-Unis, État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant, car les autorités de ce pays lui refusaient l'entrée sur le territoire.

Plus récemment, suite à la décision de la Cour suprême qui avait été saisie des appels joints dans D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, NSW Department of Community Services [2001] HCA 39, (2001) 180 ALR 402 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], les tribunaux ont accordé une attention plus particulière à la situation à laquelle l'enfant allait devoir faire face après son retour.

Pour une illustration de ce phénomène dans une affaire où le parent ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant refusait de rentrer avec lui dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle, voir : Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

France
Dans la jurisprudence française, l'interprétation permissive de l'article 13(1)(b) qui prévalait initialement a été remplacée par une interprétation beaucoup plus stricte. Pour une illustration de l'interprétation permissive initiale. Voir :

Cass. Civ 1ère 12. 7. 1994, S. c. S.. See Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ 1ère, 22 juin 1999, No de RG 98-17902 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

et pour une illustration de l'interprétation plus stricte, voir :

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de RG 02-17411 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de RG 11/01437 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israël
Il existe dans la jurisprudence israélienne des exemples contrastés du traitement des exceptions au retour :

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro v. Ro [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]  contrastant avec :

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y v. D.R [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Pologne
Decision of the Supreme Court, 7 October 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Cour Suprême nota qu'il ne serait pas conforme à l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant de la priver des soins de sa mère, si celle-ci décidait de rester en Pologne. La Cour affirma cependant que si l'enfant devait rester en Pologne, il serait tout autant contraire à son intérêt d'être privée des soins de son père. Tenant compte de ces considérations, la Cour conclut qu'il ne pouvait pas être présumé qu'ordonner le retour de l'enfant la placerait dans une situation intolérable.

Decision of the Supreme Court, 1 December 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Cour suprême précisa que l'argument fréquemment avancé de la potentielle séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur ne justifiait pas, en principe, le jeu de l'exception. La Cour jugea qu'en l'absence d'obstacles objectifs au retour du parent ravisseur, on pouvait présumer que celui-ci accordait plus de valeur à ses propres intérêts qu'à ceux de l'enfant.

La Cour ajouta que la crainte pour le parent ravisseur de voir sa responsabilité pénale engagée ne constituait pas un obstacle objectif au retour, puisque celui-ci aurait dû avoir conscience des conséquences de ses actions. La situation était cependant plus compliquée s'agissant des nourrissons. La Cour estima que le lien spécial unissant la mère et le nourrisson ne rendait la séparation possible qu'en cas exceptionnel, et ce même en l'absence d'obstacle objectif au retour de la mère dans l'État de résidence habituelle. La Cour jugea que lorsque la mère d'un nourrisson refusait de revenir avec lui, quelles qu'en soient les raisons, alors le retour devait être refusé sur la base de l'article 13(1)(b). D'après les faits de l'espèce, le retour avait été ordonné.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Cour européenne des droits de l'homme (CourEDH)
Il existe des décisions de la CourEDH adoptant une position stricte relativement à la compatibilité des exceptions de la Convention de La Haye avec la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CEDH). Dans certaines de ces affaires, des arguments relatifs à l'exception pour risque grave étaient considérés, y compris lorsque le parent ravisseur indiquait son refus d'accompagner le retour de l'enfant. Voir :

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH confirma un recours du père à qui l'enfant avait été enlevé selon lequel les juridictions turques avaient commis une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH en refusant d'ordonner le retour de son enfant. La CourEDH jugea que, bien que le très jeune âge d'un enfant soit un critère à prendre en compte dans la détermination de son intérêt, cela ne constituait pas en soi, selon les exigences de la Convention de La Haye, un motif suffisant pour justifier le rejet d'une demande de retour.

Il a parfois été fait recours à des témoignages d'expert afin de faciliter l'évaluation des conséquences potentielles de la séparation entre l'enfant et le parent ravisseur. Voir :

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05) of 6 December 2007 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10) of 18 January 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12) of 15 May 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Cependant, il faut également noter que, depuis la décision de la Grande Chambre dans l'affaire Neulinger et Shuruk c Suisse, il est des exemples où une approche moins stricte est suivie. Dans le contexte d'une demande de retour, ce dernier jugement avait placé l'accent sur l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant enlevé et sur le fait de vérifier que les autorités nationales compétentes avaient conduit un examen détaillé de la situation familiale dans son ensemble ainsi qu'une appréciation équilibrée et raisonnable de tous les intérêts en jeu. Voir :

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Grand Chamber, of 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09) of 13 December 2011 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; et décision de la Grand Chamber X. v. Latvia (Application No 27853/09), Grand Chamber [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11) of 10 July 2012 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

Dans cette affaire, la CourEDH estima à la majorité que le retour d'un enfant aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique entrainerait une violation de l'article 8 de la CEDH. Il fut jugé que le processus de prise de décision de la Cour d'appel belge, en ce qui concerne l'article 13(1)(b), n'avait pas satisfait aux exigences procédurales posées par l'article 8 de la CEDH. Les deux juges dissidents notèrent cependant que le danger visé par l'article 13 ne saurait résulter de la seule séparation de l'enfant et du parent ravisseur.

(Auteur: Peter McEleavy, avril 2013)

Jurisprudence australienne et néo-zélandaise

Australie
En Australie une interprétation très stricte prévalait dans la jurisprudence ancienne rendue sur le fondement de l'article 13(1) b). Voir :

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @293@].

Toutefois, à la suite du jugement prononcé par la Court suprême Australienne dans les appels joints de:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority ; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401 ; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 346, 347], dans lesquels une interprétation littérale a été adoptée, l'attention se tourne désormais sur le risque encouru par l'enfant et la situation à laquelle il sera confronté après le retour.

Pour une décision rendue dans une situation où le parent ravisseur, ayant la responsabilité principale de l'enfant, refuse de rentrer dans l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant avec ce dernier, voir :

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 544].

Pour un exemple de situation dans laquelle l'enfant est exposé à un risque grave de danger psychique, voir:

J.M.B. and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 871].

Pour des exemples d'affaires récentes dans lesquelles l'exception de risque grave a été rejetée, voir :

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 782].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Des décisions d'appel avaient initialement laissé entendre que le revirement de jurisprudence australien serait également suivi en Nouvelle-Zélande, voir :

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 495].

Toutefois, la décision récente de la Cour d'appel (Auckland) (Nouvelle-Zélande),:K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 770], a réaffirmé (quoique dans obiter dictum) que l'interprétation qu'il convenait de suivre en Nouvelle-Zélande restait l'interprétation stricte donnée par la Cour d'appel dans :

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 90].

Assurer un retour sans danger / Ordonnances miroir

Une pratique s'est fait jour dans un certain nombre d'États contractants dans lesquels l'ordonnance de retour est prononcée sous réserve du respect de certaines exigences ou de certains engagements. Afin de s'assurer que ces mesures de protection sont susceptibles d'être exécutées, il peut être exigé du demandeur qu'il fasse enregistrer ces mesures en des termes identiques ou équivalents auprès des autorités de l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant. Ces décisions sont généralement décrites comme des ordonnances « assurant le retour sans danger de l'enfant » ou « ordonnances miroir ».

Des ordonnances de retour ont été rendues par les juridictions suivantes sous réserve du prononcé d'une ordonnance assurant le retour sans danger de l'enfant ou d'une ordonnance miroir :

Australie
Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWHC 1247, [2004] 2 FLR 499 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ UKe 599] ;

Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 982] ;

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309] ;

Central Authority v. Houwert [2007] SCA 88 (RSA); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 900].

Une demande déposée par la High Court anglaise concernant des mesures de protection prises dans le cadre d'une décision relative aux termes d'un droit de visite international et enregistrées dans l'État où les périodes de visite devaient se dérouler a été reprise et prolongée au Panama dans la décision :

Ruling Nº393-05-F [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/PA 872].

Une demande sollicitant le retour d'un enfant sous réserve qu'une ordonnance miroir soit rendue dans l'État d'origine fut rejetée par les juridictions israéliennes dans Family Application  8743/07 Y.D.G. v. T.G., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 983], les accusations formulées à l'encontre du père ayant été déclarées sans fondement.

Engagements

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Hechos

El menor era un niño de dos años a la fecha de la supuesta retención ilícita. Había vivido toda su vida en Nueva Zelanda. Los padres no estaban casados.

El 10 de noviembre de 1995, un consejero designado por un Tribunal de familia facilitó un acuerdo entre los padres por el cual la madre tendría la custodia y el padre derecho de visita semanal. El 22 de noviembre de 1995 la madre llevó al menor a Australia. El padre solicitó la restitución del menor.

Como consecuencia, la Autoridad central australiana solicitó al Tribunal de Familia de Nueva Zelanda una declaración conforme al Artículo quince. Se le otorgó una declaración que establecía que se trataba de una sustracción ilícita. La madre apeló ante el Tribunal Superior.

El Tribunal Superior aceptó la apelación de la madre, llegando a la conclusión de que los derechos otorgados en el acuerdo no tenían la categoría de derechos de custodia y en segundo lugar que el acuerdo no tenía ningún efecto legal. El padre apeló ante la Cámara de Apelaciones.

Fallo

La apelación fue desestimada, el traslado no era sustracción ilícita puesto que el padre no gozaba de ningún derecho legal de custodia.

Comentario INCADAT

Objetivos del Convenio

Los órganos jurisdiccionales de todos los Estados contratantes deben inevitablemente referirse a los objetivos del Convenio y evaluarlos si pretenden comprender la finalidad del Convenio y contar con una guía sobre la manera de interpretar sus conceptos y aplicar sus disposiciones.

El Convenio de La Haya de 1980 sobre Sustracción de Menores comprende explícita e implícitamente una gran variedad de objetivos ―positivos y negativos―, ya que pretende establecer un equilibrio entre los distintos intereses de las partes principales: el menor, el padre privado del menor y el padre sustractor. Véanse, por ejemplo, las opiniones vertidas en la sentencia de la Corte Suprema de Canadá: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 17].

En el artículo 1 se identifican los objetivos principales, a saber, que la finalidad del Convenio consiste en lo siguiente:

"a) garantizar la restitución inmediata de los menores trasladados o retenidos de manera ilícita en cualquier Estado contratante;

b) velar por que los derechos de custodia y de visita vigentes en uno de los Estados contratantes se respeten en los demás Estados contratantes."

En el Preámbulo se brindan más detalles al respecto, en especial sobre el objetivo primordial de obtener la restitución del menor en los casos en que el traslado o la retención ha dado lugar a una violación de derechos de custodia ejercidos efectivamente. Reza lo siguiente:

"Los Estados signatarios del presente Convenio,

Profundamente convencidos de que los intereses del menor son de una importancia primordial para todas las cuestiones relativas a su custodia,

Deseosos de proteger al menor, en el plano internacional, de los efectos perjudiciales que podría ocasionarle un traslado o una retención ilícitos y de establecer los procedimientos que permitan garantizar la restitución inmediata del menor a un Estado en que tenga su residencia habitual, así como de asegurar la protección del derecho de visita".

El objetivo de restitución y la mejor manera de acometer su consecución se ven reforzados, asimismo, en los artículos que siguen, en especial en las obligaciones de las Autoridades Centrales (arts. 8 a 10), y en la exigencia que pesa sobre las autoridades judiciales de actuar con urgencia (art. 11).

El artículo 13, junto con los artículos 12(2) y 20, que contienen las excepciones al mecanismo de restitución inmediata, indican que el Convenio tiene otro objetivo más, a saber, que en ciertas circunstancias se puede tener en consideración la situación concreta del menor (en especial su interés superior) o incluso del padre sustractor.

El Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera dirige el foco de atención (en el párr. 19) a un objetivo no explícito sobre el que descansa el Convenio que consiste en que el debate respecto del fondo del derecho de custodia debería iniciarse ante las autoridades competentes del Estado en el que el menor tenía su residencia habitual antes del traslado. Véanse por ejemplo:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AR 362]

Finlandia
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FI 839]

Francia
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 214]

Países Bajos

X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 316]

Suiza
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 986]

Reino Unido – Escocia

N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 996]

Estados Unidos de América

Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 125]

El Informe Pérez-Vera también especifica la dimensión preventiva del objetivo de restitución del Convenio (en los párrs. 17, 18 y 25), objetivo que fue destacado durante el proceso de ratificación del Convenio en los Estados Unidos (véase: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)), que ha servido de fundamento para aplicar el Convenio en ese Estado contratante. Véase:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 741]

Se ha declarado que en los casos en que un menor sustraído ha sido mantenido oculto, la aplicación del principio de suspensión del plazo de prescripción derivado del sistema de equity (equitable tolling) es coherente con el objetivo del Convenio que consiste en prevenir la sustracción de menores.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 578]

A diferencia de otros tribunales federales de apelaciones, el Tribunal del Undécimo Circuito estaba listo para interpretar que un derecho de ne exeat comprende el derecho a determinar el lugar de residencia habitual del menor, dado que el objetivo del Convenio de La Haya consiste en prevenir la sustracción internacional y que el derecho de ne exeat atribuye al progenitor la facultad de decidir el país de residencia del menor.

En otros países, la prevención ha sido invocada a veces como un factor relevante para la interpretación y la aplicación del Convenio. Véanse por ejemplo:

Canadá
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 754]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]

Los fines y objetivos del Convenio también pueden adquirir prominencia durante la vigencia del instrumento, por ejemplo, la promoción de las visitas transfronterizas, que, según los argumentos que se han postulado, surge de una aplicación estricta del mecanismo de restitución inmediata del Convenio. Véanse:

Nueva Zelanda

S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 296]

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y País de Gales

Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 60]

No hay jerarquía entre los distintos objetivos del Convenio (párr. 18 del Informe Explicativo Pérez-Vera). Por tanto, la interpretación de los tribunales puede variar de un Estado contratante a otro al adjudicar más o menos importancia a determinados objetivos. Asimismo, la doctrina puede evolucionar a nivel nacional o internacional.

En la jurisprudencia británica (Inglaterra y País de Gales), una decisión de la máxima instancia judicial de ese momento, la Cámara de los Lores, dio lugar a una revalorización de los objetivos del Convenio y, por consiguiente, a un cambio en la práctica de los tribunales con respecto a las excepciones:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937]

Anteriormente, la voluntad de dar efecto al objetivo principal de promover el retorno y evitar que se recurra de forma abusiva a las excepciones había dado lugar a un nuevo criterio sobre el "carácter excepcional" de las circunstancias en el establecimiento de las excepciones. Véanse por ejemplo:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 901]

Este criterio relativo al carácter excepcional de las circunstancias fue posteriormente declarado infundado por la Cámara de los Lores en el asunto Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

- Teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo (Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine):

En Estados Unidos la jurisprudencia ha optado por diferentes enfoques con respecto a los demandantes que no han respetado, o no habrían respetado, una resolución judicial dictada en aplicación de la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo.

En el asunto Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 150] se aplicó la teoría de la privación del acceso a la justicia del fugitivo, ya que el padre demandante había dejado los Estados Unidos para escapar de una condena penal y de otras responsabilidades ante los tribunales estadounidenses.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July25, 2000) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 326]

En este asunto el padre era un fugitivo. En segundo lugar, se podía sostener que había una conexión entre su estatus de fugitivo y la solicitud. Sin embargo, el tribunal declaró que la conexión no era lo suficientemente importante como para se pudiera aplicar la teoría. En todo caso, estimó que su aplicación impondría una sanción demasiado severa en un caso de derechos parentales.

En el asunto March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 386] no se aplicó la teoría en un caso en que el demandante no había respetado resoluciones civiles.

En un asunto en Canadá, Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 760], el estatus de fugitivo del padre fue declarado un factor a tener en cuenta, en el sentido de representar un riesgo grave para el menor.

Autor: Peter McEleavy

Conceptos autónomos

En curso de elaboración.

¿Qué se entiende por derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio?

Los tribunales de una abrumadora mayoría de Estados contratantes han aceptado que el derecho a oponerse a la salida del menor de la jurisdicción equivale a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio. Véanse:

Australia
En el caso Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, Oberster Gerichtshof, 05/02/1992 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 375];

Canadá
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 11];

La Corte Suprema estableció una distinción entre una cláusula de no traslado en una orden de custodia provisoria y en una orden definitiva. Sugirió que si una cláusula de no traslado incluida en una orden de custodia definitiva se considerara equivalente a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio, ello tendría serias implicancias para los derechos de movilidad de la persona que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 334];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880];

Francia
Ministère Public c. M.B., 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 62];

Alemania
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Tribunal Constitucional Federal), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 803];

Sudáfrica
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 309];

Suiza
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 427].

Estados Unidos de América
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Right to Object to a Removal
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Para comentarios académicos véanse:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 ss;

M. Bailey, The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention, Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287.

C. Whitman, Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Declaración del artículo 15

Preparación del análisis de jurisprudencia de INCADAT en curso.

Sustracción por quien ejerce el cuidado principal del menor

Una cuestión controvertida es cómo responder cuando el padre que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor lo sustrae y amenaza con no acompañarlo de regreso al Estado de residencia habitual en caso de expedirse una orden de restitución.

Los tribunales de muchos Estados contratantes han adoptado un enfoque muy estricto, por lo que, salvo en situaciones muy excepcionales, se han rehusado a estimar la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b) cuando se presenta este argumento relativo a la negativa del sustractor a regresar. Véanse:

Austria
4Ob1523/96, Oberster Gerichtshof (tribunal supremo de Austria), 27/02/1996 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 561]

Canadá
M.G. c. R.F., [2002] R.J.Q. 2132 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 762]

N.P. v. A.B.P., [1999] R.D.F. 38 (Que. C.A.) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 764]

En este caso se dictó una resolución de no restitución porque los hechos eran excepcionales. Había habido una amenaza genuina a la madre, que justificadamente le generó temor por su seguridad si regresaba a Israel. Fue engañada y llevada a Israel, vendida a la mafia rusa y revendida al padre, quien la forzó a prostituirse. Fue encerrada, golpeada por el padre, violada y amenazada. Estaba realmente atemorizada, por lo que no podía esperarse que regresara a Israel. Habría sido totalmente inapropiado enviar al niño de regreso sin su madre a un padre que había estado comprando y vendiendo mujeres y llevando adelante un negocio de prostitución.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34]

Re C. (Abduction: Grave Risk of Psychological Harm) [1999] 1 FLR 1145 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 269]

No obstante, una sentencia más reciente del Tribunal de Apelaciones inglés ha refinado el enfoque del caso C. v. C.: Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Grave Risk of Harm) [2002] EWCA Civ 908, [2002] 3 FCR 43 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 469].

En este caso, se resolvió que la negativa de una madre a restituir al menor era apta para configurar una defensa, puesto que no constituía un acto carente de razonabilidad, sino que surgía como consecuencia de una enfermedad que ella padecía. Cabe destacar, sin embargo, que aun así se expidió una orden de restitución. En este marco se puede hacer referencia a las sentencias del Tribunal Supremo del Reino Unido en Re E. (Children) (Abduction: Custody Appeal) [2011] UKSC 27, [2012] 1 A.C. 144 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1068] y Re S. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2012] UKSC 10, [2012] 2 A.C. 257 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1147]. En estas decisiones se aceptó que el temor que una madre podía tener con respecto a la restitución ―aunque no estuviere fundado en riesgos objetivos, pero sí fuere de una intensidad tal como para considerar que el retorno podría afectar sus habilidades de cuidado al punto de que la situación del niño podría volverse intolerable―, en principio, podría ser suficiente para declarar configurada la excepción del artículo 13(1)(b).

Alemania
10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486]

21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln (tribunal regional superior) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491]

Anteriormente, se había adoptado una interpretación mucho más liberal: 17 UF 260/98, Oberlandesgericht Stuttgart [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 323]

Suiza
5P.71/2003 /min, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 788]

5P.65/2002/bnm, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referenia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 789]

5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841]

5A_285/2007 /frs, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 955]

5A_479/2012, IIe Cour de droit civil [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 1179]

Nueva Zelanda
K.S. v. LS. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770]

Reino Unido - Escocia
McCarthy v. McCarthy [1994] SLT 743 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 26]

Estados Unidos de América
Panazatou v. Pantazatos, No. FA 96071351S (Conn. Super. Ct. September 24, 1997) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USs 97]

En otros Estados contratantes, el enfoque adoptado con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución ha sido diferente:

Australia
En Australia, en un principio, la jurisprudencia relativa al Convenio adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución. Véase:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294]

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293]

En la sentencia State Central Authority v. Ardito, de 20 de octubre de 1997 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 283], el Tribunal de Familia de Melbourne estimó que la excepción de grave riesgo se encontraba configurada por la negativa de la madre a la restitución, pero, en este caso, a la madre se le había negado la entrada a los Estados Unidos de América, Estado de residencia habitual del menor.

Luego de la sentencia dictada por el High Court de Australia (la máxima autoridad judicial en el país), en el marco de las apelaciones conjuntas D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], se prestó más atención a la situación que debe enfrentar el menor luego de la restitución.

En el marco de los casos en que el progenitor sustractor era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor, que luego se niega a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase: Director General, Department of Families v. RSP. [2003] FamCA 623 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Francia
En Francia, un enfoque permisivo del artículo 13(1)(b) ha sido reemplazado por una interpretación mucho más restrictiva. Véanse:

Cass. Civ. 1ère 12.7.1994, S. c. S., Rev. Crit. 84 (1995), p. 96 note H. Muir Watt; JCP 1996 IV 64 note Bosse-Platière, Defrénois 1995, art. 36024, note J. Massip [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 103]

Cass. Civ. 1ère 22 juin 1999, No de pourvoi 98-17902 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 498]

Los casos siguientes constituyen ejemplos de la interpretación más estricta:

Cass Civ 1ère, 25 janvier 2005, No de pourvoi 02-17411 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 708]

CA Agen, 1 décembre 2011, No de pourvoi 11/01437 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 1172]

Israel
En la jurisprudencia israelí se han adoptado respuestas divergentes a los argumentos tendentes a la no restitución:

Civil Appeal 4391/96 Ro. v. Ro [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 832]

A diferencia de:

Family Appeal 621/04 D.Y. v. D.R. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 833]

Polonia
Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 7 de octubre de 1998, I CKN 745/98 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 700]

La Corte Suprema señaló que privar a la niña del cuidado de su madre, si esta última decidía permanecer en Polonia, era contrario al interés superior de la menor. No obstante, también afirmó que si permanecía en Polonia, estar privada del cuidado de su padre también era contrario a sus intereses. Por estas razones, el Tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que no se podía declarar que la restitución fuera a colocarla en una situación intolerable.

Decisión de la Corte Suprema, 1 de diciembre de 1999, I CKN 992/99 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/PL 701]

La Corte Suprema precisó que el típico argumento sobre la posible separación del niño del padre privado del menor no es suficiente, en principio, para que se configure la excepción. Declaró que en los casos en los que no existen obstáculos objetivos para que el padre sustractor regrese, se puede presumir que el padre sustractor adjudica una mayor importancia a su propio interés que al interés del niño.

La Corte añadió que el miedo del padre sustractor a incurrir en responsabilidad penal no constituye un obstáculo objetivo a la restitución, ya que se considera que debería haber sido consciente de sus acciones. Sin embargo, la situación se complica cuando los niños son muy pequeños. La Corte declaró que el lazo especial que existe entre la madre y su bebe hace que la separación sea posible solo en casos excepcionales, aun cuando no existan circunstancias objetivas que obstaculicen el regreso de la madre al Estado de residencia habitual. La Corte declaró que en los casos en que la madre de un niño pequeño se niega a la restitución, por la razón que fuere, se deberá desestimar la demanda de retorno sobre la base del artículo 13(1)(b). En base a los hechos del caso, se resolvió en favor de la restitución.

Uruguay
Solicitud conforme al Convenio de La Haya sobre los Aspectos Civiles de la Sustracción Internacional de Menores - Casación, IUE 9999-68/2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UY 1185]

Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos (TEDH)
Existen sentencias del TEDH en las que se adoptó un enfoque estricto con respecto a la compatibilidad de las excepciones del Convenio de La Haya con el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos (CEDH). En algunos de estos casos se plantearon argumentos respecto de la cuestión del grave riesgo, incluso en asuntos en los que el padre sustractor ha expresado una negativa a acompañar al niño en el retorno. Véase:

Ilker Ensar Uyanık c. Turquie (Application No 60328/09) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1169]

En este caso, el TEDH acogió la apelación del padre solicitante en donde este planteaba que la negativa de los tribunales turcos a resolver la restitución del menor implicaba una vulneración del artículo 8 del CEDH. El TEDH afirmó que si bien se debe tener en cuenta la corta edad del menor para determinar qué es lo más conveniente para él en un asunto de sustracción, no se puede considerar este criterio por sí solo como justificación suficiente, en el sentido del Convenio de La Haya, para desestimar la demanda de restitución.

Se ha recurrido a pruebas periciales para determinar las consecuencias que pueden resultar de la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

Maumousseau and Washington v. France (Application No 39388/05), 6 de diciembre de 2007 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 942]

Lipowsky and McCormack v. Germany (Application No 26755/10), 18 de enero de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1201]

MR and LR v. Estonia (Application No 13420/12), 15 de mayo de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1177]

Sin embargo, también cabe señalar que desde la sentencia de la Gran Sala del caso Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland ha habido ejemplos en los que se ha adoptado un enfoque menos estricto. En esta sentencia se había puesto énfasis en el interés superior del niño en el marco de una demanda de restitución, y en determinar si los tribunales nacionales habían llevado a cabo un examen pormenorizado de la situación familiar y una evaluación equilibrada y razonable de los intereses de cada una de las partes. Véanse:

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07), Gran Sala, 6 de julio de 2010 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1323]

X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), 13 de diciembre de 2011 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1146]; y sentencia de la Gran Sala X. c. Letonia (demanda n.° 27853/09), Gran Sala [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1234]

B. v. Belgium (Application No 4320/11), 10 de julio de 2012 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ 1171]

En este caso, la mayoría sostuvo que el retorno del menor a los Estados Unidos de América constituiría una violación al artículo 8 del CEDH. Se declaró que el proceso decisorio del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Bélgica con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) no había observado los requisitos procesales inherentes al artículo 8 del CEDH. Los dos jueces que votaron en disidencia resaltaron, no obstante, que el riesgo al que hace referencia el artículo 13 no debe estar relacionado únicamente con la separación del menor del padre sustractor.

(Autor: Peter McEleavy, abril de 2013)

Jurisprudencia de Australia y Nueva Zelanda

En Australia, inicialmente se adoptó un enfoque muy estricto con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b). Véanse:

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Director General of the Department of Family and Community Services v. Davis (1990) FLC 92-182 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 293].

Sin embargo, luego de la sentencia dictada por el tribunal supremo en el marco de apelaciones conjuntas:

D.P. v. Commonwealth Central Authority; J.L.M. v. Director-General, New South Wales Department of Community Services (2001) 206 CLR 401; (2001) FLC 93-081), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 346, 347], en la que se adoptó una interpretación literal de la excepción, se presta más atención al riesgo que enfrenta el menor y a la situación posterior a la restitución. 

En el marco del caso de un sustractor —que era la persona que ejercía el cuidado principal del menor— que se negaba a regresar al Estado de residencia habitual del menor, véase:

Director General, Department of Families v. R.S.P. [2003] FamCA 623, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 544].

Con relación a un menor que enfrentaba un grave riesgo de daño psicológico, véase:

JMB and Ors & Secretary, Attorney-General's Department [2006] FamCA 59, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 871].

Para ejemplos recientes de casos en los que se rechazó la excepción de grave riesgo de daño, véase:

H.Z. v. State Central Authority [2006] FamCA 466, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 876];

State Central Authority v. Keenan [2004] FamCA 724, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 782].

Nueva Zelanda
La autoridad de apelación, en principio, indicó que el cambio de énfasis adoptado en Australia con respecto al artículo 13(1)(b) se seguiría asimismo en Nueva Zelanda. Véase:

El Sayed v. Secretary for Justice, [2003] 1 NZLR 349, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 495].

No obstante, en la decisión más reciente: K.S. v. L.S. [2003] 3 NZLR 837 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 770] el tribunal de apelaciones (High Court) de Nueva Zelanda (Auckland) confirmó, aunque formulado obiter dictum, que la interpretación vinculante en Nueva Zelanda continuaba siendo la interpretación estricta efectuada por el Tribunal de Apelaciones en el caso:

Anderson v. Central Authority for New Zealand [1996] 2 NZLR 517 (CA), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 90].

Restitución segura / órdenes espejo

En un número de Estados contratantes ha surgido una práctica para que las órdenes de restitución estén sujetas al cumplimiento de determinados requisitos o compromisos específicos. A fin de asegurar que tales medidas de protección sean ejecutables, se le puede exigir al solicitante que registre estas medidas en términos idénticos o equivalentes en el Estado de residencia habitual del menor. Por lo general se hace referencia a estas órdenes replicadas como de "restitución segura" u "órdenes espejo".

En las siguientes jurisdicciones, las órdenes de restitución se han sometido al dictado de una orden de restitución segura u órdenes espejo:

Australia
Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re W. (Abduction: Domestic Violence) [2004] EWHC 1247, [2004] 2 FLR 499  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ UKe 599];

Re F. (Children) (Abduction: Removal Outside Jurisdiction) [2008] EWCA Civ. 842, [2008] 2 F.L.R. 1649, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 982];

Sudáfrica
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 309];

Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

El Juzgado Segundo de Niñez y Adolescencia de Panamá hizo lugar a una solicitud por parte del High Court inglés de medidas de protección accesorias a una orden sobre un derecho de visita internacional que debían ser registradas en el Estado en el que tendría lugar la visita. Véase:

Ruling Nº393-05-F, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/PA 872].

Una solicitud de que una orden de restitución quedara sujeta a la implementación de órdenes espejo fue rechazada en

Israel
Family Application  8743/07 Y.D.G. v T.G., [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 983].

El Tribunal de Familia de Jerusalén decidió que dado que las acusaciones contra el padre no habían sido confirmadas, no había fundamentos para imponer condiciones para el regreso seguro del niño, más que ordenar que el padre deposite una suma de dinero de modo de garantizar su compromiso de permitirles vivir en su apartamento. No había necesidad de obtener una orden espejo de los tribunales de Estados Unidos, ya que la demora que ello produciría generaría un daño a los niños.

Compromisos

Preparación del análisis de jurisprudencia de INCADAT en curso.