CASE

No full text available

Case Name

B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299

INCADAT reference

HC/E/IE 287

Court

Country

IRELAND

Name

Supreme Court

Level

Superior Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Denham, Keane and Lynch JJ.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

IRELAND

Decision

Date

28 July 1997

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

1 3 8 12 13(1)(a) 13(1)(b) 18

HC article(s) Relied Upon

13(1)(a)

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to

-

INCADAT comment

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Discretionary Nature of Article 13
Consent
Classifying Consent
Establishing Consent
Consent and Alleged Deception
Prospective Consent

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child was nearly 1 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. The infant had lived in both England and Ireland. The parents were separated.

On 24 May 1996 the father took the child to Ireland with the mother's consent. On 5 August 1996 the High Court in London ordered that the child be returned to England.

On 23 October 1996 the High Court in Dublin rejected the mother's application for the return of the child, finding that she had consented to the removal. The mother appealed.

Ruling

Appeal allowed and case remitted to the High Court for it to exercise its discretion as to whether the child should be returned to England.

INCADAT comment

Discretionary Nature of Article 13

The drafting of Article 13 makes clear that where one of the constituent exceptions is established to the standard required by the Convention, the making of a non-return order is not inevitable, rather the court seised of the return petition has a discretion whether or not to make a non-return order.

The most extensive recent overview of the exercise of the discretion to return in child abduction cases has come in the decision of the supreme United Kingdom jurisdiction, the House of Lords, in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 937].

In that case Baroness Hale affirmed that it would be wrong to import any test of exceptionality into the exercise of discretion under the Hague Convention. The circumstances in which a return might be refused were themselves exceptions to the general rule. It was neither necessary nor desirable to import an additional gloss into the Convention.

The manner in which the discretion would be exercised would differ depending on the facts of the case; general policy considerations, including not only the swift return of abducted children, but also comity between Contracting States, mutual respect for judicial processes and deterrence of abductions, had to be weighed against the interests of the child in the individual case. A court would be entitled to take into account the various aspects of the Convention policy, alongside the circumstances which gave the court a discretion in the first place and the wider considerations of the child's rights and welfare. Sometimes Convention objectives would be given more weight than the other considerations and sometimes they would not.

The discretionary nature of the exceptions is seen most commonly within the context of Article 13(2) - objections of a mature child - but there are equally examples of return orders being granted notwithstanding other exceptions being established.


Consent

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 995];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267].


Acquiescence

New Zealand
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [INCADAT Cite: HC/E/NZ @472@].


Grave Risk

New Zealand
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [INCADAT Cite: HC/E/NZ @538@].

It may be noted that in the English appeal Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ UKe @880@] Baroness Hale held that it was inconceivable that a child might be returned where a grave risk of harm was found to exist.

Classifying Consent

The classification of consent has given rise to difficulty. Some courts have indeed considered that the issue of consent goes to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention and should therefore be considered within Article 3, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 312];

France
CA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [INCADAT cite : HC/E/FR 897];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 54];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1014].

Although the issue had ostensibly been settled in English case law, that consent was to be considered under Art 13(1) a), neither member of the two judge panel of the Court of Appeal appeared entirely convinced of this position. 

Reference can equally be made to examples where trial courts have not considered the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but where consent, in terms of initially going along with a move, has been treated as relevant to wrongfulness, see:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 969];

Switzerland
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 425];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 186].

The case was not considered in terms of the Art 3 - Art 13(1) a) distinction, but given that the father initially went along with the relocation it was held that there would be neither a wrongful removal or retention.

The majority view is now though that consent should be considered in relation to Article 13(1) a), see:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 830];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267];

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 591];

Ireland
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 287];

United Kingdom - Scotland
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 997];

For a discussion of the issues involved see Beaumont & McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, 1999 at p. 132 et seq.

Establishing Consent

Different standards have been applied when it comes to establishing the Article 13(1) a) exception based on consent.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In an early first instance decision it was held that ordinarily the clear and compelling evidence which was necessary would need to be in writing or at least evidenced by documentary material, see:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 37].

This strict view has not been repeated in later first instance English cases, see:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 55].

In Re K. it was held that while consent must be real, positive and unequivocal, there could be circumstances in which a court could be satisfied that consent had been given, even though not in writing.  Moreover, there could also be cases where consent could be inferred from conduct.

Germany
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 491].

Convincing evidence is required to establish consent.

Ireland
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 817].

The Re K. approach was specifically endorsed by the Irish Supreme Court.

The Netherlands
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NL 318].

Consent need not be for a permanent stay.  The only issue is that there must be consent and that it has been proved convincingly.

South Africa
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 900].

Consent could be express or tacit.

Switzerland
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),[INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung ) (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 896];

The Swiss Supreme Court has held that with regard to consent and acquiescence, the left behind parent must clearly agree, explicitly or tacitly, to a durable change in the residence of the child.  To this end the burden is on the abducting parent to show factual evidence which would lead to such a belief being plausible.

United States of America
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 808].

There must be a subjective assessment of what the applicant parent was actually contemplating. Consideration must also be given to the nature and scope of the consent.

Consent and Alleged Deception

There are examples of cases where it has been argued that prima facie consent should be vitiated by alleged deception on the part of the abducting parent, see for example:

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 267].

The fact that a document consenting to the removal of the children was presented to the mother on a pretext did not necessarily lead to the conclusion that it was a trap.  The mother was found to have consented.  But the trial judge nevertheless exercised his discretion to make a return order.

Israel
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IL 940].

Allegation of deception rejected; the father's consent was found to be informed and since it had been relied upon by the mother, the father could not renege on his initial consent to the relocation.

Prospective Consent

There is authority that consent might validly be given to a future removal, see:

Canada
Decision of 4 September 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 333].

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 993].

It was held that the happening of the event must be reasonably ascertainable and there must not have been a material change in the circumstances since the consent was given.

United Kingdom - Scotland
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 76].

For a criticism of the majority view in Zenel v. Haddow, see:

Case commentary 1993 SCLR 872 at 884, 885;

G. Maher, Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention, 1993 SLT 281;

P. Beaumont and P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999 at pp. 129, 130.

Faits

L'enfant était âgé de presque un an à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait vécu à la fois en Angleterre et en Irlande. Les parents étaient séparés.

Le 24 mai 1996, le père emmena l'enfant en Irlande avec le consentement de la mère. Le 5 août 1996, le juge de premier degré londonien (High Court) ordonna le retour de l'enfant en Angleterre.

Le 23 octobre 1996, le juge de Dublin (High Court) rejeta la demande de retour de l'enfant, formée par la mère, estimant qu'elle avait consenti au déplacement. La mère forma un recours.

Dispositif

Le recours a été accueilli et l'affaire renvoyée à la High Court qui devra user de son pouvoir d'appréciation pour décider de renvoyer ou non l'enfant en Angleterre.

Commentaire INCADAT

Nature discrétionnaire de l'article 13

Selon les termes de l'article 13, il est clair que lorsque les conditions d'application d'une exception sont établies, le non-retour n'est pas forcément ordonné : le tribunal saisi de la demande de retour a un pouvoir discrétionnaire.

Ce pouvoir discrétionnaire a été étudié très en détail par une toute récente décision de la juridiction suprême britannique, la Chambre des Lords, dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Dans cette affaire, le juge Hale a affirmé qu'il convenait de rejeter toute mention d'exception lors de l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire en vertu de la Convention de La Haye,  dans la mesure où les circonstances dans lesquelles le retour pourrait être refusé sont elles-mêmes des exceptions au principe général du retour. Le caractère exceptionnel étant donc inhérent au mécanisme; il n'était ni utile ni désirable d'importer une exigence supplémentaire.

Dans l'exercice de leur pouvoir discrétionnaire, il convenait pour les juges de prendre en compte, outre l'intérêt des enfants en cause, plusieurs principes généraux, l'objectif de retour immédiat des enfants enlevés mais également la courtoisie internationale, le respect mutuel pour les procédures menées dans les États contractants et l'importance de la prévention des enlèvements. Une juridiction pouvait tenir compte des divers principes sous-tendant la Convention, des circonstances de l'affaire et d'éléments liés aux droits et au bien-être de l'enfant. Dans certains cas, les principes conventionnels étaient amenés à primer, dans d'autres cas non.

La nature discrétionnaire des exceptions se rencontre le plus fréquemment dans le contexte de l'article 13(2) (opposition d'un enfant mûr), mais il existe également des exemples de demandes de retour auxquelles il a été fait droit nonobstant l'établissement d'exceptions supplémentaires.


Consentement

Australie
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 995] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 267].


Acquiescement

Nouvelle-Zélande
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @472@].

Risque Grave

Nouvelle-Zélande
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ @538@].

Il convient de noter que dans l'arrêt de la cour d'appel anglaise Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ UKe @880@] le juge Hale avait estimé qu'il était inconcevable d'ordonner le retour d'un enfant si un risque grave de danger était établi.

Qualification du consentement

La question de savoir si le consentement relève de l'article 3 ou de l'article 13(1) a) a posé difficulté. Certaines juridictions considèrent que le consentement est un élément permettant d'apprécier l'illicéité du déplacement ou du non-retour, et l'apprécient donc dans le cadre de l'article 3. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU @312@];

FranceCA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 897];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @54@];

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1014].

Bien que la question eût été a priori réglée par la jurisprudence anglaise, selon laquelle le consentement relevait de l'art. 13(1) a), aucun des deux juges de la Cour d'appel siégeant en l'espèce n'est apparu convaincu par cette position.

On peut aussi évoquer des exemples où des tribunaux de première instance n'ont pas fait référence à la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a) mais où le consentement, en tant qu'acceptation initiale du déménagement, a été considéré comme un élément de l'illicéité, voir:

Canada
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969], Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 969];

Suisse
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 425]

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 186].

L'affaire n'a pas été abordée sous l'angle de la distinction entre l'art. 3 et l'art. 13(1) a), mais étant donné que le père avait initialement accepté le déménagement, il a été considéré qu'il n'y avait eu ni déplacement ni non-retour illicite.

La plupart des décisions révèlent toutefois que la question du consentement est généralement analysée dans le contexte de l'article 13(1) a), voir :

Australie
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @830@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@] ;

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912 ;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@] ;

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @591@] ;

Irlande
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @287@] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 997].

Pour une analyse des problèmes cités ci-dessus, voir.: P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 132 et seq.

Établissement du consentement

Des exigences différentes ont été appliquées en matière d'établissement d'une exception de l'article 13(1) a) pour consentement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans une décision de première instance ancienne, il fut considéré qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve claire et impérieuse et qu'en général cette preuve devait être écrite ou en tout cas soutenue par des éléments de preuve écrits. Voir :

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @37@].

Cette approche restrictive n'a pas été maintenue dans des décisions de première instance plus récentes au Royaume-Uni. Voir :

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @53@];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @55@].

Dans Re K. il fut décidé que si le consentement devait être réel, positif and non équivoque, il y avait des situations dans lesquelles le juge pouvait se satisfaire de preuves non écrites du consentement, et qu'il se pouvait même que le consentement fût déduit du comportement.

Allemagne
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE @491@].

Il fut décidé qu'il était nécessaire d'apporter une preuve convaincante du consentement.

Irlande
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE @817@].

La Cour suprême irlandaise repris expressément les termes de Re K.

Pays-Bas
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader/father) en H. (de moeder/mother) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL @318@].

Le consentement peut ne pas porter sur un séjour permanent, pourvu que le consentement à un séjour au moins temporaire soit établi de manière convaincante.

Afrique du Sud
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA @900@].

Le consentement pouvait être exprès ou tacite.

Suisse
5P.367/2005 /ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @841@] ;

5P.380/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile),  [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @895@];

5P.1999/2006 /blb, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH @896@].

Le Tribunal fédéral suisse estima qu'il y avait consentement et acquiescement du parent victime si celui-ci avait accepté, expressément ou implicitement, un changement durable de la résidence de l'enfant. Il appartenait au parent ravisseur d'apporter des éléments de preuve factuels rendant plausible qu'il avait pu croire à ce consentement.

États-Unis d'Amérique
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf @808@].

Il convenait de rechercher ce que le parent victime avait en tête et également de prendre en compte la nature et l'étendue du consentement.

Consentement et allégation de dol

Certaines affaires illustrent l'idée que ce qui apparaît à première vue comme un consentement pourrait être vicié en raison du dol commis par le parent ravisseur. Voir par exemple :

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe @267@].

Le fait qu'un document faisant état de son consentement au déplacement des enfants ait été présenté à la mère sous un faux prétexte ne fut pas analysé comme représentant nécessairement une preuve de dol. Il fut conclu que la mère avait bien consenti au déplacement mais le juge décida dans le cadre de son pouvoir discrétionnaire d'ordonner néanmoins le retour.

Israël
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL @940@].

Allégation de dol rejetée, le consentement du père était éclairé et puisque la mère y avait cru, le père ne pouvait le rétracter.

Consentement prospectif

Il a été considéré par la jurisprudence que le consentement pouvait validement s'entendre du consentement à un déplacement futur :

Canada
Décision du 4 septembre 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 333] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 993].

Dans cette affaire, le tribunal a décidé que l'accomplissement de l'évènement futur devait pouvoir être établi de manière raisonnable et qu'il ne devait pas y avoir eu de changement matériel des circonstances après que le consentement eût été donné.

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 76].

Pour une critique de la position de la majorité des juges dans l'affaire Zenel v. Haddow, voir :

La note suivant le rapport de la décision dans SCLR 1993, p. 872 spec. 884 et 885;

G. Maher, « Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention », SLT, 1993, p. 281 ;

P. Beaumont et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 129 et 130.

Hechos

El menor tenía casi un año al momento del traslado supuestamente ilícito. Había vivido tanto en Inglaterra como en Irlanda. Los padres estaban separados.

El 24 de mayo de 1996, el padre llevó al menor a Irlanda con el consentimiento de la madre. El 5 de agosto de 1996, el tribunal de primera instancia de Londres (High Court) ordenó la restitución del menor a Inglaterra.

El 23 de octubre de 1996, el tribunal de Dublín (High Court) rechazó la solicitud de restitución del menor presentada por la madre, por constatar que esta había consentido el traslado. La madre presentó recurso de apelación.

Fallo

El recurso de apelación fue concedido y se remitió el caso a la High Court para que hiciera ejercicio de sus facultades de apreciación para determinar si el menor debía ser devuelto a Inglaterra.

Comentario INCADAT

Carácter discrecional del artículo 13

La redacción del artículo 13 deja en claro que cuando se encuentra configurada una de las excepciones previstas en el Convenio, el dictado de una orden de no restitución no es inevitable; por el contrario, el tribunal que conoce de la solicitud de restitución tiene la facultad discrecial para pronunciar o no una orden de restitución.

El estudio reciente más amplio del ejercicio de la discreción en cuanto a ordenar la restitución en casos de sustracción de menores ha surgido de la decisión de la jurisdicción suprema del Reino Unido, la Cámara de los Lores, en Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 937].

En ese caso, la Baronesa Hale afirmó que convenía no incluir mencion de circunstancias excepcionales en cuanto al ejercicio de discreción en la aplicación del Convenio de La Haya. Las circunstancias en las cuales se podría denegar una restitución eran en sí mismas excepciones a la regla general. No era necesario ni deseable importar una exigencia adicional al Convenio.

La manera en la cual se ejercería la discreción diferiría dependiendo de los hechos del caso; las consideraciones de política general —entre ellas no solo la pronta restitución de los menores sustraídos, sino también la cortesía entre los Estados contratantes, el respeto mutuo por los procesos judiciales y la disuasión para no cometer sustracciones— tendrían que ser ponderadas con respecto al interés del menor en cada caso. Un tribunal estaría facultado para tener en cuenta los diversos aspectos de la política del Convenio, junto con las circunstancias que le dieron al tribunal una discreción en primer lugar y las consideraciones más amplias de los derechos y el bienestar del menor. Algunas veces se le daría más peso a los objetivos del Convenio que a las otras consideraciones y otras veces no.

El carácter discrecional de las excepciones se ve más comúnmente en el contexto del artículo 13(2) (objeciones de un menor maduro), pero hay igualmente ejemplos de órdenes de restitución otorgadas a pesar de haberse configurado otras excepciones.

Consentimiento

Australia
Kilah & Director-General, Department of Community Services [2008] FamCAFC 81 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 995

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267]

Aceptación posterior

Nueva Zelanda
U. v. D. [2002] NZFLR 529 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ @472@].

Riesgo Grave

Nueva Zelanda
McL. v. McL., 12/04/2001, transcript, Family Court at Christchurch (New Zealand) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ @538@]

Puede observarse que en la apelación inglesa Re D. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2006] UKHL 51; [2007] 1 AC 619 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ UKe @880@], la Baronesa Hale sostuvo que era inconcebible que se pudiera restituir a un menor cuando se establece la existencia de un riesgo grave.

Clasificación del consentimiento

La clasificación del consentimiento ha traído dificultades. Algunos tribunales efectivamente han considerado que la cuestión del consentimiento hace a la ilicitud del traslado o la retención y por lo tanto debería considerarse en el marco del artículo 3. Véanse:

Australia
In the Marriage of Regino and Regino v. The Director-General, Department of Families Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs Central Authority (1995) FLC 92-587 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AU 312];

Francia
CA Rouen, 9 mars 2006, N°05/04340 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/FR 897];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re O. (Abduction: Consent and Acquiescence) [1997] 1 FLR 924 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 54].

Re P.-J. (Children) [2009] EWCA Civ 588 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 1014].

Aunque la jurisprudencia inglesa había establecido claramente que el consentimiento debía ser considerado a la luz del artículo 13(1) a), ninguno de los miembros de las 2 salas del Tribunal de Apelaciones parecía estar enteramente convencido de esta posición.

Del mismo modo, puede hacerse referencia a ejemplos donde los jueces de primera instancia no consideraron la distinción del artículo 13(1) a), pero en los que el consentimiento, en términos de una conformidad inicial con la medida, se ha considerado relevante para la determinacion de la ilicitud. Véanse:

Canadá
F.C. c. P.A., Droit de la famille - 08728, Cour supérieure de Chicoutimi, 28 mars 2008, N°150-04-004667-072 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 969];

Suiza
U/EU970069, Bezirksgericht Zürich (Zurich District Court) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 425]

Reino Unido - Escocia
Murphy v. Murphy 1994 GWD 32-1893 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 186].

El caso no fue considerado a la luz de la distinción de los artículos 3 y 13(1) a), pero dado que el padre había consentido el traslado, se entendió que no había habido ilicitud.

La opinión de la mayoría es ahora, sin embargo, que se debería considerar el consentimiento con relación al artículo 13(1) a). Véanse:

Australia
Director-General, Department of Child Safety v. Stratford [2005] Fam CA 1115 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 830];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 53];

T. v. T. (Abduction: Consent) [1999] 2 FLR 912;

Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267];

Re P. (A Child) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [2004] EWCA CIV 971, [2005] Fam. 293 [Referncia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 591];

Irlanda
B.B. v. J.B. [1998] 1 ILRM 136; sub nom B. v. B. (Child Abduction) [1998] 1 IR 299 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 287].

Reino Unido - Escocia
T. v. T. 2004 S.C. 323 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 997];

Para una discusión sobre estas cuestiones, ver Beaumont y McEleavy, Convenio de La Haya sobre la Sustracción Internacional de Menores, OUP, 1999 p. 132 ss.

Establecimiento del consentimiento

Se han aplicado diferentes estándares cuando se trata de determinar la aplicación de la excepción del artículo 13(1) a) fundada en el consentimiento.

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
En una de las primeras decisiones de primera instancia se sostuvo que, en circunstancias normales, las pruebas claras y contundentes requeridas deberían constar por escrito o al menos ser prueba documental. Véase:

Re W. (Abduction: Procedure) [1995] 1 FLR 878, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 37].

Esta visión estricta no se ha repetido en casos ingleses de primera instancia posteriores. Véanse:

Re C. (Abduction: Consent) [1996] 1 FLR 414 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 53];

Re K. (Abduction: Consent) [1997] 2 FLR 212 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 55].

En Re K. se sostuvo que aunque el consentimiento debe ser real, positivo e inequívoco, podría haber circunstancias en las cuales un tribunal podría concluir que se hubiese prestado consentimiento, aunque no por escrito. Asimismo, podría haber casos en los que el consentimiento se podría inferir de la conducta.

Alemania
21 UF 70/01, Oberlandesgericht Köln, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 491].

Se requieren pruebas contundentes para establecer la existencia de consentimiento.

Irlanda
R. v. R. [2006] IESC 7 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 817].

La resolución adoptada en Re K. fue respaldado por la Corte Suprema de Irlanda.

Países Bajos
De Directie Preventie, optredend voor haarzelf en namens F. (vader) en H. (de moeder) (14 juli 2000, ELRO-nummer: AA6532, Zaaknr.R99/167HR); [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NL 318].

El consentimiento no tiene que ser para una estancia permanente. La única cuestión es que debe haber consentimiento y que haya sido acreditado de manera convincente.

Sudáfrica
Central Authority v. H. 2008 (1) SA 49 (SCA) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 900].

El consentimiento podría ser expreso o tácito.

Suiza

5P.367/2005 /ast; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841];

5P.380/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 895];

5P.1999/2006 /blb; Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 896].

La Corte Suprema de Suiza ha sostenido con respecto al consentimiento y la aceptación posterior, que el padre privado del menor debe pretar su consentimiento de manera clara, explícita o tácita, a un cambio duradero en la residencia del menor. A estos efectos, el sustractor tiene la carga de producir pruebas fácticas que lleven a que esa creencia sea plausible.

Estados Unidos de América
Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 808].

Debe haber una evaluación subjetiva de lo que estaba contemplando verdaderamente el padre solicitante. También se debe considerar el carácter y el alcance del consentimiento.

Consentimiento y supuesto fraude

Existen ejemplos de casos donde se ha argumentado que el consentimiento prima facie debe estar viciado por un supuesto fraude por parte del sustractor. Véase, por ejemplo:

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re D. (Abduction: Discretionary Return) [2000] 1 FLR 24, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 267].

El hecho de que bajo pretexto se presentara a la madre un documento que acreditaba consentimiento al traslado de menores no necesariamente llevaba a la conclusión de que se tratara de una trampa. Se concluyó que la madre había prestado consentimiento. No obstante, el juez del juicio ejerció su discreción para expedir una orden de restitución.

Israel
Family Application 2059/07 Ploni v. Almonit [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IL 940].

Se rechazó el supuesto de fraude; se concluyó que el consentimiento del padre fue informado y puesto que la madre había confiado en él, el padre no podía retractarse de su consentimiento inicial al traslado.

Consentimiento prospectivo

Existe jurisprudencia en la que se consideró que se puede consentir de manera válida un futuro traslado. Véanse:

Canadá
Decision of 4 September 1998 [1998] R.D.F. 701 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 333].

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
Re L. (Abduction: Future Consent) [2007] EWHC 2181 (Fam), [2008] 1 FLR 915; [Referencita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 993].

Se sostuvo que el acaecimiento de un acontecimiento debe ser razonablemente determinable y no debe haber habido un cambio material en las circunstancias desde que se prestó el consentimiento.

Reino Unido - Escocia
Zenel v. Haddow 1993 SC 612 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 76].

Para una crítica de la opinión de la mayoría en Zenel v. Haddow, véanse:

Comentario del caso 1993 SCLR 872 at 884, 885;

G. Maher, Consent to Wrongful Child Abduction under the Hague Convention, 1993 SLT 281;

P. Beaumont and P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, OUP, Oxford, 1999, pp. 129, 130.