CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653

INCADAT reference

HC/E/ZA 265

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Name

High Court

Level

First Instance

Judge(s)
Hale J.

States involved

Requesting State

UNITED KINGDOM - ENGLAND AND WALES

Requested State

SOUTH AFRICA

Decision

Date

25 June 1999

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Article 15 declaration granted

HC article(s) Considered

3 15

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 15

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249; Re B. (Abduction) (Rights of Custody) [1997] 2 FLR 594; Re B.-M. (Wardship: Jurisdiction) [1993] 1 FLR 979; B. v. B. (Child Abduction: Custody Rights) [1993] Fam 32, [1992] 3 WLR 865, [1993] 2; All ER 144, sub nom. B. v. B. (Abduction) [1993] 1 FLR 238.

INCADAT comment

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?
Rights of Custody held by a Court
Inchoate Rights of Custody
Article 15 Decision or Determination

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a boy, was 1 1/2 at the date of the alleged wrongful removal. He had lived in England since his birth in the same household with both his parents. His parents were not married.

Some time around February 1999 the father invited the mother to make a parental responsibility agreement with him but she refused. At the end of April the parent's relationship deteriorated. The mother had a termination of pregnancy and told the father she intended to move out of their shared home.

On 5 May the father made an urgent, ex parte application for a parental responsibility order and a prohibited steps order. The district judge held that there was insufficient evidence to make the order ex parte and he adjourned the application for 7 days.

However, on the evening of 5 May the mother took the boy to South Africa, her State of origin. On 6 May the father appeared before the same district judge who made an order that the mother return the child to the jurisdiction.

The father then applied for the return of the child under the Convention. He was advised by the English Central Authority that he should first obtain a declaration that the removal was wrongful.

Ruling

Declaration granted that the removal was wrongful, being in breach of custody rights held by the court.

INCADAT comment

The mother sought leave to appeal the decision, but this was refused, see: Re J. (Abduction: Wrongful Removal) [2000] 1 FLR 78.

For a consideration of other cases where the exercise of custody rights by a court arose see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., "The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction" OUP, Oxford, 1999, at p. 66 et seq.

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Rights of Custody held by a Court

Preparation of INCADAT commentary in progress.

Inchoate Rights of Custody

The reliance on 'inchoate custody rights', to afford a Convention remedy to applicants who have actively cared for removed or retained children, but who do not possess legal custody rights, was first identified in the English decision:

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 4],

and has subsequently been followed in that jurisdiction in:

Re O. (Child Abduction: Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 505].

The concept has been the subject of judicial consideration in:

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 506].

In one English first instance decision: Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 265], it was questioned whether the concept was in accordance with the decision of the House of Lords in Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 2] where it was held that de facto custody was not sufficient to amount to rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

The concept of 'inchoate custody rights', has attracted support and opposition in other Contracting States.

The concept has attracted support in a New Zealand first instance case: Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 471].

However, the concept was specifically rejected by the majority of the Irish Supreme Court in the decision of: H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 284].

Keane J. stated that it would go too far to accept that there was 'an undefined hinterland of inchoate rights of custody not attributed in any sense by the law of the requesting state to the party asserting them or to the court itself, but regard by the court of the requested state as being capable of protection under the terms of the Convention.'

The Court of Justice of the European Union has subsequently upheld the position adopted by the Irish Courts:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

In its ruling the European Court noted that the attribution of rights of custody, which were not accorded to an unmarried father under national law, would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the mother. 

This formulation leaves open the status of ‘incohate rights’ in a EU Member State where the concept had become part of national law.  The United Kingdom (England & Wales) would fall into this category, but it must be recalled that pursuant to the terms of Protocol (No. 30) on the Application of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union to Poland and to the United Kingdom (OJ C 115/313, 9 May 2008), the CJEU could not in any event make a finding of inconsistency with regard to UK law vis-a-vis Charter rights. 

For academic criticism of the concept of inchoate rights see: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E. 'The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction' Oxford, OUP, 1999, at p. 60.

Article 15 Decision or Determination

The Role and Interpretation of Article 15

Article 15 is an innovative mechanism which reflects the cooperation which is central to the 1980 Hague Convention.  It provides that the authorities of a Contracting State may, prior to making a return order, request that the applicant obtain from the authorities of the child's State of habitual residence a decision or other determination that the removal or retention was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention, where such a decision or determination may be obtained in that State. The Central Authorities of the Contracting States shall so far as practicable assist applicants to obtain such a decision or determination.

Scope of the Article 15 Decision or Determination Mechanism

Common law jurisdictions are divided as to the role to be played by the Article 15 mechanism, in particular whether the court in the child's State of habitual residence should make a finding as to the wrongfulness of the removal or retention, or, whether it should limit its decision to the extent to which the applicant possesses custody rights under its own law.  This division cannot be dissociated from the autonomous nature of custody rights for Convention purposes as well as that of 'wrongfulness' i.e. when rights of custody are to be deemed to have been breached.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
The Court of Appeal favoured a very strict position with regard to the scope of Article 15:

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court held that where the question for determination in the requested State turned on a point of autonomous Convention law (e.g. wrongfulness) then it would be difficult to envisage any circumstances in which an Article 15 request would be worthwhile.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 866].

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

Whilst there was unanimity as to the utility and binding nature of a ruling of a foreign court as to the content of the rights held by an applicant, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, further specified that the foreign court would additionally be much better placed than the English court to understand the true meaning and effect of its own laws in Convention terms.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

A majority in the Court of Appeal, approving of the position adopted by the English Court of Appeal in Hunter v. Morrow, held that a court seised of an Article 15 decision or determination should restrict itself to reporting on matters of national law and not stray into the classification of a removal as being wrongful or not; the latter was exclusively a matter for the court in the State of refuge in the light of its assessment of the autonomous law of the Convention. 

Status of an Article 15 Decision or Determination

The status to be accorded to an Article 15 decision or determination has equally generated controversy, in particular the extent to which a foreign ruling should be determinative as regards the existence, or inexistence, of custody rights and in relation to the issue of wrongfulness.

Australia
In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

The court noted that a decision or determination under Article 15 was persuasive only and that it was ultimately a matter for the French courts to decide whether there had been a wrongful removal.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 809].

The Court of Appeal held that an Article 15 decision or determination was not binding and it rejected the determination of wrongfulness made by the New Zealand High Court: M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1021]. In so doing it noted that New Zealand courts did not recognise the sharp distinction between rights of custody and rights of access which had been accepted in the United Kingdom.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 866].

The Court of Appeal declined to accept the finding of the Romanian courts that the father did not have rights of custody for the purposes of the Convention.

This position was however reversed by the House of Lords in the Deak case:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

The House of Lords held unanimously that where an Article 15 decision or determination was sought the ruling of the foreign court as to the content of the rights held by the applicant must be treated as conclusive, save in exceptional cases where, for example, the ruling had been obtained by fraud or in breach of the rules of natural justice. Such circumstances were absent in the present case, therefore the trial court and the Court of Appeal had erred in disregarding the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal and in allowing fresh evidence to be adduced.

As regards the characterisation of the parent's rights, Baroness Hale, with whom Lord Hope and Lord Brown agreed, held that it would only be where this was clearly out of line with the international understanding of the Convention's terms, as might well have been the case in Hunter v. Murrow, should the court in the requested state decline to follow it. For his part Lord Brown affirmed that the determination of content and classification by the foreign court should almost invariably be treated as conclusive.

Switzerland
5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 953].

The Swiss supreme court held that a finding on custody rights would in principle bind the authorities in the requested State.  As regards an Article 15 decision or determination, the court noted that commentators were divided as to the effect in the requested State and it declined to make a finding on the issue.

Practical Implications of Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Recourse to the Article 15 mechanism will inevitably lead to delay in the conduct of a return petition, particularly should there happen to be an appeal against the original determination by the authorities in the State of habitual residence. See for example:

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880].

This practical reality has in turn generated a wide range of judicial views.

In Re D. a variety of opinions were canvassed. Lord Carswell affirmed that resort to the procedure should be kept to a minimum. Lord Brown noted that it would only be used on rare occasions. Lord Hope counselled against seeking perfection in ascertaining whether a removal or retention was wrongful, rather a balance had to be struck between acting on too little information and searching for too much. Baroness Hale noted that when a country first acceded to the Convention Article 15 might be useful in cases of doubt to obtain an authoritative ruling on the content and effect of the local law.

New Zealand
Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/NZ 1018].

The majority in the Court of Appeal, suggested that Article 15 requests should only rarely be made as between Australia and New Zealand, given the similarities of the legal systems.

Alternatives to Seeking an Article 15 Decision or Determination

Whilst courts may simply wish to determine the foreign law in the light of the available information, an alternative is to seek expert evidence.  Experience in England and Wales has shown that this is far from fool-proof and does not necessarily result in time being saved, see: 

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 1020].

In the latter case Thorpe L.J. suggested that greater recourse could be made to the European Judicial Network, through the International Family Law Office at the Royal Courts of Justice. Pragmatic advice could be offered as to the best route to follow in a particular case: whether to go for a single joint expert; whether to go for an Article 15 decision or determination; or whether to go for an opinion from the liaison judge as to the law of his own country, an opinion that would not be binding but which would perhaps help the parties and the trial court to see the weight, or want of weight, in the challenge to the plaintiff's ability to cross the Article 3 threshold.

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de 1 an ½ à la date du déplacement dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait vécu en Angleterre depuis sa naissance, avec ses deux parents. Les parents n'étaient pas mariés.

Vers le mois de février 1999, le père demanda à la mère de faire avec lui un accord sur la garde, mais elle refusa. A la fin avril, les relations entre les parents se détériorèrent. La mère subit une interruption de grossesse et informa le père de son intention de quitter le domicile commun.

Le 5 mai, le père saisit le juge de l'urgence d'une demande non contradictoire tendant à la garde de l'enfant et à l'interdiction de sortie du territoire de celui-ci. Le juge estima qu'il ne disposait pas des preuves suffisantes pour parvenir à sa décision et décida d'un sursis à statuer d'une semaine.

Cependant, le soir du 5 mai, la mère emmena l'enfant en Afrique du Sud, dont elle était originaire. Le 6 mai, le père se présenta devant le même juge qui ordonna le retour de l'enfant.

Le père demanda alors le retour de l'enfant en application de la Convention. L'Autorité Centrale anglaise lui conseilla d'obtenir d'abord une déclaration constatant que le déplacement était illicite.

Dispositif

Attestation produite constatant que le déplacement était illicite, puisqu'il méconnaissait le droit de garde de la Cour.

Commentaire INCADAT

La mère demanda à être autorisée à former un recours contre la décision, mais fut déboutée de cette demande. Voy. : Re J. (Abduction : Wrongful Removal) [2000] 1 FLR 78.

Pour une analyse des autres cas où on a admis l'existence d'un droit de garde en faveur d'une juridiction, voy. : Beaumont P.R. & McEleavy P.E., « The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction » OUP, Oxford, 1999, p. 66 s.

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Droit de garde confié à un tribunal

Résumé INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Droit de garde implicite

La notion de « droit de garde implicite », laquelle permet à certaines parties non-gardiennes s'étant activement occupées d'enfants finalement déplacés ou retenus à l'étranger de faire utilement valoir une demande de retour sur le fondement de la Convention a vu le jour dans l'affaire Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 4].

La notion a été réutilisée dans :

Re O. (Child Abduction : Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 505].

Le concept de droit de garde implicite a également été discuté dans :

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 506].

Dans une autre décision anglaise de première instance, Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 265], la question s'était posée de savoir si ce concept était conforme à la décision de la Chambre des Lords dans l'affaire Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 2]. Dans cette espèce, il fut considéré que la garde factuelle d'un enfant ne suffisait pas à représenter un véritable droit de garde au sens de la Convention.

Le concept de « droit de garde implicite » a été diversement accueilli à l'étranger.

Il a été bien accueilli dans la décision néo-zélandaise rendue en première instance dans l'affaire Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 471].

Toutefois, ce concept a été clairement rejeté par la majorité de la cour suprême irlandaise dans l'affaire H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IE 284]. Keane J. a estimé que « ce serait aller trop loin que de considérer que de mystérieux droits de garde implicites non reconnus officiellement par le droit de l'État requérant à une juridiction ou une partie les invoquant puissent être regardés par les juridictions de l'État requis comme susceptible de bénéficier de la protection conventionnelle. » [Traduction du Bureau Permanent]

La Cour de justice de l'Union européenne a confirmé par la suite la position adoptée par les tribunaux irlandais:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a indiqué dans sa décision que l'attribution des droits de garde, qui en vertu de la législation nationale ne pouvaient être attribués à un père non marié, serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux de la mère.

Cette formulation laisse ouverte la question du statut du droit de garde implicite dans un État membre de l'Union européenne lorsque ce concept a été intégré au droit national. C'est le cas du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), mais il convient de rappeler que conformément au Protocole (No 30) sur l'application de la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l'Union européenne à la Pologne et au Royaume-Uni (OJ C 115/313, 9 Mai 2008), la CJUE ne pourrait en aucun cas constater une incompatibilité du droit britannique vis-à-vis de la Charte.

Pour une critique de ce droit, voir : P. Beaumont. et P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 60.

Décision ou attestation selon l'article 15

Rôle et interprétation de l’article 15

L’article 15 constitue un mécanisme innovant qui traduit la coopération, élément central au fonctionnement de la Convention Enlèvement d’enfants de 1980. Cet article prévoit la possibilité pour les autorités d’un État contractant, avant de déposer une demande de retour, d’exiger que le demandeur obtienne, le cas échéant, de la part des autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant, une décision ou autre attestation constatant le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non‑retour de l’enfant au sens de l’article 3 de la Convention. Les Autorités centrales des États contractants doivent, dans la mesure du possible, aider les demandeurs à obtenir cette décision ou attestation.

Portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 aux fins d’obtention de décisions ou d’attestations

Les États de tradition de common law sont divisés quant au rôle du mécanisme de l’article 15. Ils s’interrogent en particulier quant à la nature de la décision ; le tribunal de l’État de résidence habituelle de l’enfant doit-il statuer sur le caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ou se contenter d’établir si le demandeur est bel et bien titulaire du droit de garde en vertu du droit interne ? Cette distinction est indissociable de l’interprétation autonome du droit de garde et du caractère « illicite » aux fins de la Convention, autrement dit estime-t-on que le droit de garde a été violé.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

La Cour d’appel s’est prononcée en faveur d’une position très stricte quant à la portée du mécanisme de l’article 15 :

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour a conclu qu’il était difficile d’envisager des circonstances dans lesquelles une demande aux fins de l’article 15 peut avoir une quelconque utilité, si la demande d’attestation dans l’État requis a trait à un point d’interprétation autonome de la Convention (par ex., le caractère illicite).

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 866].

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Si l’utilité et le caractère contraignant d’une décision d’un tribunal étranger portant sur l’étendue des droits du demandeur ont fait l’unanimité, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a insisté sur le fait que le tribunal étranger était bien mieux placé qu’un tribunal anglais pour comprendre les véritables signification et effet de ses propres lois aux termes de la Convention.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

Se ralliant à la décision de la Cour d’appel anglaise dans l’affaire Hunter v. Morrow, la Cour d’appel néo-zélandaise a conclu, à la majorité, qu’un tribunal saisit d’une demande de décision ou d’attestation aux fins de l’article 15 devrait se contenter de consigner les questions relevant du droit national et ne pas s’aventurer à classer le déplacement comme illicite ou non. Ce dernier point relève exclusivement de la compétence des tribunaux de l’État de refuge, compte tenu de l’interprétation autonome de la Convention.

Statut d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le statut qu’il convient d’accorder à une décision ou attestation de l’article 15 s’est également révélé source de controverse, en particulier eu égard à la nature ou non probante d’une décision étrangère eu égard à l’existence ou non du droit de garde et quant au caractère illicite.

Australie

In the Marriage of R. v. R., 22 May 1991, transcript, Full Court of the Family Court of Australia (Perth), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

La Cour a estimé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était qu’indicative et qu’il appartenait aux tribunaux français de déterminer si le déplacement était illicite.

Royaume-Uni – Angleterre et Pays de Galles

Hunter v. Murrow [2005] EWCA Civ 976, [2005] 2 F.L.R. 1119, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 809].

La Cour d’appel a jugé que la décision ou attestation de l’article 15 n’était pas probante et a réfuté les conclusions de la Haute Cour néo-zélandaise quant au caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour : M. v. H. [Custody] [2006] NZFLR 623 (HC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1021]. Ce faisant, elle a indiqué que les tribunaux néo-zélandais ne reconnaissaient pas la distinction entre les droits de garde et d’accès, distinction admise au Royaume-Uni.

Deak v. Deak [2006] EWCA Civ 830, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 866].

La Cour d’appel a refusé les conclusions des tribunaux roumains indiquant que le père ne disposait pas du droit de garde en vertu de la Convention.

La Chambre des Lords a néanmoins infirmé cette position dans l’affaire Deak :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

La Chambre des Lords a conclu à l’unanimité qu’en cas de demande de décision ou d’attestation en vertu de l’article 15, la décision du tribunal étranger quant à l’étendue du droit du demandeur doit être, sauf circonstances exceptionnelles (par ex. si la décision résulte d’une fraude ou viole les principes élémentaires de justice), considérée comme probante. Il n’existait en l’espèce aucune circonstance exceptionnelle, le tribunal de première instance et la Cour d’appel ont dont commis une erreur en ne tenant pas compte de la décision de la Cour d’appel de Bucarest et en autorisant la production de nouvelles preuves.

Pour ce qui est de la détermination des droits du parent, la Baronne Hale, suivie de Lord Hope et Lord Brown, a estimé que le tribunal de l’État requis pouvait refuser de s’y conformer, uniquement lorsque cette détermination est clairement contraire à l’interprétation internationale de la Convention, comme cela a pu être le cas dans l’affaire Hunter v. Murrow. Pour sa part, Lord Brown a jugé que la détermination des droits et du caractère illicite devait, en toutes circonstances, être jugée probante.

Suisse

5A_479/2007/frs, Tribunal fédéral, IIè cour civile, 17 octobre 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 953].

La Cour suprême suisse a jugé qu’une conclusion quant au droit de garde serait, en principe, contraignante pour les autorités de l’État requis. Pour ce qui est des décisions ou attestations de l’article 15, la Cour a indiqué que les avis parmi les commentateurs étaient partagés quant à leurs effets et a refusé de se prononcer sur la question.

Conséquences pratiques d’une décision ou attestation de l’article 15

Le recours au mécanisme de l’article 15 provoquera inéluctablement des retards dans le cadre de la demande de retour, en particulier lorsque la décision ou attestation d’origine fait l’objet d’un appel interjeté par les autorités de l’État de résidence habituelle. Voir par exemple :

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] 1 AC 619, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880].

Cette réalité pratique a à son tour généré une grande quantité d’opinions de juges.

L’affaire Re D. a suscité de nombreuses opinions. Lord Carswell a affirmé qu’il conviendrait de limiter au minimum le recours à cette procédure. Lord Brown a indiqué qu’un tel mécanisme ne serait utilisé qu’à de rares occasions. Lord Hope a conseillé d’éviter de rechercher la perfection dans l’examen du caractère illicite du déplacement ou du non-retour ; il conviendrait selon lui d’établir un juste milieu entre le fait d’agir sur base d’informations trop faibles et d’en solliciter trop. La Baronne Hale a indiqué qu’en cas d’adhésion récente d’un État à la Convention, l’article 15 pouvait, en cas de doute, s’avérer utile aux fins d’obtention d’une décision contraignante sur le contenu et les effets du droit local.

Nouvelle-Zélande

Fairfax v. Ireton [2009] NZFLR 433 (NZ CA), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 1018].

La Cour d’appel a, à la majorité, estimé que les demandes au titre de l’article 15 ne devraient être utilisées que très rarement entre l’Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande, compte tenu de la similarité de ces deux ordres juridiques.

Solutions alternatives à une demande aux fins de l’article 15

Dans les cas où les tribunaux souhaitent simplement établir quel est le droit étranger à la lumière des informations disponibles, le recours à un expert en la matière peut apparaître comme une solution de rechange. L’expérience en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles a montré que cette méthode est loin d’être infaillible et qu’elle ne permet pas toujours de gagner du temps, voir :

Re F. (A Child) (Abduction: Refusal to Order Summary Return) [2009] EWCA Civ 416, [2009] 2 F.L.R. 1023, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 1020].

Dans ce dernier cas, le juge Thorpe a émis l’avis que l’on pourrait plus souvent recourir au Réseau judiciaire européen, par l’intermédiaire du Bureau international du droit de la famille au sein de la Royal Courts of Justice. Des conseils pratiques pourraient ainsi être émis quant à la meilleure marche à suivre dans un cas particulier : recourir conjointement à un unique expert ; solliciter une décision ou attestation en vertu de l’article 15 ; solliciter l’opinion d’un juge de liaison concernant le droit de son État, opinion qui ne serait pas contraignante mais qui pourrait aider les parties et le tribunal à distinguer le poids des arguments ou des intentions dans la contestation de la faculté du plaignant à remplir les conditions établies à l’article 3.

Hechos

El menor tenía 1 año y medio en la fecha del supuesto traslado ilícito. Él había vivido en Inglaterra desde su nacimiento y en la misma casa con ambos padres. Sus padres no estaban casados.

Durante de febrero de 1999, el padre invitó a la madre a celebrar un acuerdo de responsabilidad parental, pero ella se negó. A fines de abril la relación parental se deterioró. La madre tuvo una interrupción del embarazo y le dijo al padre que tenía intenciones de mudarse del hogar que compartían.

El 5 de mayo, el padre realizó una solicitud ex parte urgente para obtener una orden de responsabilidad parental y una orden de medidas de restricción. El juez de distrito sostuvo que la prueba era insuficiente para emitir una orden ex parte y suspendió la solicitud por 7 días.

Sin embargo, la noche del 5 de mayo la madre se llevó al menor a Sudáfrica, su Estado de origen. El 6 de mayo, el padre compareció ante el mismo juez de distrito quien emitió la orden de que la madre restituya al menor a la jurisdicción.

El padre luego, solicitó la restitución del menor en virtud del Convenio. La Autoridad Central Inglesa (English Central Authority) le informó que primero debería obtener una declaración de que el traslado fue ilícito.

Fallo

Declaración concedida de que el traslado fue ilícito, y que se produjo en violación de los derechos de custodia impuestos por el tribunal.

Comentario INCADAT

La madre intentó conseguir permiso para apelar la decisión, pero fue denegada, véase: Re J. (Abduction: Wrongful Removal) [2000] 1 FLR 78.

Para análisis de otros casos en los que los derechos de custodia fueron iniciados por un tribunal, véase: Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., "The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction" OUP, Oxford, 1999, at p. 66 et seq.

¿Qué se entiende por derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio?

Los tribunales de una abrumadora mayoría de Estados contratantes han aceptado que el derecho a oponerse a la salida del menor de la jurisdicción equivale a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio. Véanse:

Australia
En el caso Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 de septiembre de 1999, Tribunal de Familia de Australia (Brisbane) [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, Oberster Gerichtshof, 05/02/1992 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AT 375];

Canadá
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 11];

La Corte Suprema estableció una distinción entre una cláusula de no traslado en una orden de custodia provisoria y en una orden definitiva. Sugirió que si una cláusula de no traslado incluida en una orden de custodia definitiva se considerara equivalente a un derecho de custodia a los fines del Convenio, ello tendría serias implicancias para los derechos de movilidad de la persona que ejerce el cuidado principal del menor.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CA 334];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 880];

Francia
Ministère Public c. M.B., 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/FR 62];

Alemania
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Tribunal Constitucional Federal), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/DE 486];

Reino Unido - Escocia
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 803];

Sudáfrica
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/ZA 309];

Suiza
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/CH 427].

Estados Unidos de América
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Right to Object to a Removal
[Traducción en curso - Por favor remítase a la versión inglesa]

Para comentarios académicos véanse:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 ss;

M. Bailey, The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention, Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287.

C. Whitman, Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Derechos de custodia asumidos por un tribunal

En curso de elaboración.

Derechos de custodia imperfectos

La invocación de "derechos de custodia imperfectos" para que pueda activarse el mecanismo convencional para solicitantes que han cuidado activamente de menores trasladados o retenidos pero que carecen de derechos de custodia, fue identificada por primera vez en la decisión inglesa:

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction) [1994] 2 FLR 249 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 4],

y seguida posteriormente en dicha jurisdicción en:

Re O. (Child Abduction: Custody Rights) [1997] 2 FLR 702, [1997] Fam Law 781 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 5];

Re G. (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2002] 2 FLR 703 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 505].

El concepto ha sido objeto de consideración judicial en:

Re W. (Minors) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Uke 503];

Re B. (A Minor) (Abduction: Father's Rights) [1999] Fam 1 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 504];

Re G. (Child Abduction) (Unmarried Father: Rights of Custody) [2002] EWHC 2219 (Fam); [2002] ALL ER (D) 79 (Nov), [2003] 1 FLR 252 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 506].

En una decisión inglesa de primera instancia, Re J. (Abduction: Declaration of Wrongful Removal) [1999] 2 FLR 653 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 265], se puso en duda si el concepto era congruente con la decisión de la Cámara de los Lores en Re J. (A Minor)(Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2], donde se sostuvo que la custodia de facto no era suficiente para constituir derechos de custodia en el sentido del Convenio.

El concepto de "derechos de custodia imperfectos" ha suscitado tanto apoyo como oposición en otros Estados contratantes.

El concepto obtuvo apoyo en la decisión de primera instancia de Nueva Zelanda:
Anderson v. Paterson [2002] NZFLR 641 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 471].

Sin embargo, el concepto fue expresamente rechazado por la mayoría del Tribunal Supremo de Irlanda en la decisión de: H.I. v. M.G. [1999] 2 ILRM 1; [2000] 1 IR 110 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/IE 284].

Keane J. afirmó que sería ir demasiado lejos aceptar que había "un área remota indefinida de derechos de custodia imperfectos no atribuidos en ningún sentido por el Derecho del Estado requirente a la parte que los invoca o al propio tribunal, sino un reconocimiento por parte del Estado requerido de su capacidad de protección según los términos del Convenio."

Para una crítica académica del concepto, véase:

Beaumont P.R. and McEleavy P.E., The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, en p. 60. Actualizado el 31 de marzo de 2005 y el 17 de febrero de 2009.

Declaración del artículo 15

Preparación del análisis de jurisprudencia de INCADAT en curso.