CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709

INCADAT reference

HC/E/UKs 184

Court

Country

UNITED KINGDOM - SCOTLAND

Name

Inner House of the Court of Session (Second Division)

Level

Appellate Court

Judge(s)
Lord Justice Clerk (Ross), Lords Murray and Morison

States involved

Requesting State

CANADA

Requested State

UNITED KINGDOM - SCOTLAND

Decision

Date

13 October 1993

Status

-

Grounds

-

Order

-

HC article(s) Considered

3 12 13(1)(a)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3

Other provisions

-

Authorities | Cases referred to
Dickson v. Dickson 1990 SCLR 692; Re H. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 WLR 68, [1991] 3 All ER 230; Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 3 WLR 492, [1990] 2 All ER 961; R. v. Barnet London Borough Council, ex parte Shah [1983] 2 AC 309, [1983] 2 WLR 16, [1983] 1 All ER 226.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Removal & Retention
Commencement of Removal / Retention
Habitual Residence
Habitual Residence

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR | ES

Facts

The child, a boy, was 5 3/4 at the date of the alleged wrongful retention. He had lived in Canada all of his life. During a trial separation the parents decided that the child would live in Scotland with the father for four months. On 5 November 1992 the father took the child to Scotland. They were scheduled to return on 5 March 1993.

On 9 February 1993 the mother applied to an Ontario court for custody of all four children of the marriage and for the return of the boy to Canada. On 7 May 1993 this application was granted.

On 28 September 1993 the Outer House of the Court of Session in Scotland ordered the return of the child on the basis that the mother's consent had been for a limited period only and that the retention thereafter was wrongful. The father appealed.

Ruling

Reclaiming motion (appeal) allowed; case remitted to the Outer House of the Court of Session to determine the issues of wrongful retention and habitual residence.

INCADAT comment

When remitted to the Outer House it was held that there had not been a wrongful removal but a wrongful retention after 5 March 1993. The return of the child was ordered; see Findlay v. Findlay, 1995 SLT 492, 1994 SCLR 523 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 185].

The interpretation of the Inner House with regard to the international element of a removal or retention mirrors that of the House of Lords in Re H. and Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 115].

Commencement of Removal / Retention

Primarily this will be a factual question for the court seised of the return petition. The issue may be of relevance where there is doubt as to whether the 12 month time limit referred to in Article 12(1) has elapsed, or indeed if there is uncertainty as to whether the alleged wrongful act has occurred before or after the entry into force of the Convention between the child's State of habitual residence and the State of refuge.

International Dimension

A legal issue which has arisen and been settled with little controversy in several States, is that as the Convention is only concerned with international protection for children from removal or retention and not with removal or retention within the State of their habitual residence, the removal or retention in question must of necessity be from the jurisdiction of the courts of the State of the child's habitual residence and not simply from the care of holder of custody rights.

Australia
Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 113]. 

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];  Kay J. confirmed that time did not run, for the purposes of Art. 12, from the moment the child arrived in the State of refuge.

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];  Kay J. held that the precise determination of time had to be calculated in accordance with local time at the place where the wrongful removal had occurred.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re H.; Re S. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 All ER 230, [1991] 2 FLR 262, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 115].

United Kingdom - Scotland
Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 184].

However in a very early Convention case Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SC 55, 1987 SLT 568, 1987 SCLR 344, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 116], the parties were at one in proceeding on the basis that the relevant removal for the purposes of the Convention was a removal in breach of custody rights rather than a removal from the country where the child previously lived. 

Agreement on the issue of the commencement of return was not reached in the Israeli case Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [INCADAT cite:  HC/E/IL 938].  One judge accepted that the relevant date was the date of removal from the State of habitual residence, whilst the other who reached a view held that it was the date of arrival in Israel. 

Communication of Intention Not to Return a Child

Different positions have been adopted as to whether a retention will commence from the moment a person decides not to return a child, or whether the retention only commences from when the other custody holder learns of the intention not to return or that intention is specifically communicated.

United Kingdom - England & Wales
In Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Wrongful Retention) [1994] Fam 70, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 117], the English High Court was prepared to accept that an uncommunicated decision by the abductor was of itself capable of constituting an act of wrongful retention.

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 50]: the moment the mother unilaterally decided not to return the child was not the point in time at which the retention became wrongful. This was no more than an uncommunicated intention to retain the child in the future from which the mother could still have resiled.  The retention could have originated from the date of the aunt's ex parte application for residence and prohibited steps orders.

United States of America
Slagenweit v. Slagenweit, 841 F. Supp. 264 (N.D. Iowa 1993), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 143].

The wrongful retention did not begin to run until the mother clearly communicated her desire to regain custody and asserted her parental right to have the child live with her.

Zuker v. Andrews, 2 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. Mass. 1998) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKf 122], the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts held that a retention occurs when, on an objective assessment, a dispossessed custodian learns that the child is not to be returned.

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 879].

The Court of Appeals held that ultimately it was not required to decide whether a child was not retained under the Convention until a parent unequivocally communicated his or her desire to regain custody, but it assumed that this standard applied.

Habitual Residence

The interpretation of the central concept of habitual residence (Preamble, Art. 3, Art. 4) has proved increasingly problematic in recent years with divergent interpretations emerging in different jurisdictions. There is a lack of uniformity as to whether in determining habitual residence the emphasis should be exclusively on the child, with regard paid to the intentions of the child's care givers, or primarily on the intentions of the care givers. At least partly as a result, habitual residence may appear a very flexible connecting factor in some Contracting States yet much more rigid and reflective of long term residence in others.

Any assessment of the interpretation of habitual residence is further complicated by the fact that cases focusing on the concept may concern very different factual situations. For example habitual residence may arise for consideration following a permanent relocation, or a more tentative move, albeit one which is open-ended or potentially open-ended, or indeed the move may be for a clearly defined period of time.

General Trends:

United States Federal Appellate case law may be taken as an example of the full range of interpretations which exist with regard to habitual residence.

Child Centred Focus

The United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit has advocated strongly for a child centred approach in the determination of habitual residence:

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/US 935].

See also:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 221].

Combined Child's Connection / Parental Intention Focus

The United States Courts of Appeals for the 3rd and 8th Circuits, have espoused a child centred approach but with reference equally paid to the parents' present shared intentions.

The key judgment is that of Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 83].

See also:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 879].

In the latter case a distinction was drawn between the situation of very young children, where particular weight was placed on parental intention(see for example: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 808]) and that of older children where the impact of parental intention was more limited.

Parental Intention Focus

The judgment of the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 301] has been highly influential in providing that there should ordinarily be a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence before a child can acquire a new one.

This interpretation has been endorsed and built upon in other Federal appellate decisions so that where there was not a shared intention on the part of the parents as to the purpose of the move this led to an existing habitual residence being retained, even though the child had been away from that jurisdiction for an extended period of time. See for example:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 777]: United States habitual residence retained after 8 months of an intended 4 year stay in Germany;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 780]: United States habitual residence retained during 32 month stay in Mexico;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 482]: United States habitual residence retained during 27 month stay in Greece.

The Mozes approach has also been approved of by the Federal Court of Appeals for the 2nd and 7th Circuits:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 878].

It should be noted that within the Mozes approach the 9th Circuit did acknowledge that given enough time and positive experience, a child's life could become so firmly embedded in the new country as to make it habitually resident there notwithstanding lingering parental intentions to the contrary.

Other Jurisdictions

There are variations of approach in other jurisdictions:

Austria
The Supreme Court of Austria has ruled that a period of residence of more than six months in a State will ordinarily be characterized as habitual residence, and even if it takes place against the will of the custodian of the child (since it concerns a factual determination of the centre of life).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
In the Province of Quebec, a child centred focus is adopted:

In Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 651], the Cour d'appel de Montréal held that the determination of the habitual residence of a child was a purely factual issue to be decided in the light of the circumstances of the case with regard to the reality of the child's life, rather than that of his parents. The actual period of residence must have endured for a continuous and not insignificant period of time; the child must have a real and active link to the place, but there is no minimum period of residence which is specified.

Germany
A child centred, factual approach is also evident in German case law:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 944].

This has led to the Federal Constitutional Court accepting that a habitual residence may be acquired notwithstanding the child having been wrongfully removed to the new State of residence:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/DE 233].

The Constitutional Court upheld the finding of the Higher Regional Court that the children had acquired a habitual residence in France, notwithstanding the nature of their removal there. This was because habitual residence was a factual concept and during their nine months there, the children had become integrated into the local environment.

Israel
Alternative approaches have been adopted when determining the habitual residence of children. On occasion, strong emphasis has been placed on parental intentions. See:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 939].

However, reference has been made to a more child centred approach in other cases. See:

decision of the Supreme Court in C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/Il 922].

New Zealand
In contrast to the Mozes approach the requirement of a settled intention to abandon an existing habitual residence was specifically rejected by a majority of the New Zealand Court of Appeal. See

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 816].

Switzerland
A child centred, factual approach is evident in Swiss case law:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 841].

United Kingdom
The standard approach is to consider the settled intention of the child's carers in conjunction with the factual reality of the child's life.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 2]. For academic commentary on the different models of interpretation given to habitual residence. See:

R. Schuz, "Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice", Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13, No. 1, 2001, p. 1;

R. Schuz, "Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context", Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Faits

L'enfant, un garçon, était âgé de 5 ans ¾ à la date du non-retour dont le caractère illicite était allégué. Il avait vécu au Canada toute sa vie. A la suite de la séparation judiciaire, les parents décidèrent que l'enfant resterait en Ecosse avec le père pour une durée de quatre mois. Le 5 novembre 1992, le père emmena l'enfant en Ecosse. La date du retour était fixée au 5 mars 1993.

Le 9 février 1993, la mère saisit le juge de l'Ontario d'une demande de garde concernant les quatre enfants issus du mariage et d'une demande tendant au retour du petit garçon au Canada. Le 7 mai, sa demande était accueillie.

Le 28 septembre 1993, la Outer House of the Court of Session (première instance) ordonna le retour de l'enfant au motif que le consentement de la mère avait été donné pour une période limitée et que, dès lors, le non-retour était illicite. Le père interjeta appel.

Dispositif

L'appel a été accueilli ; l'affaire fut renvoyée à la Outer House of the Court of Session pour qu'elle statue sur les questions de non-retour illicite et de résidence habituelle.

Commentaire INCADAT

La Outer House estima quand l'affaire lui fut renvoyée qu'il n'y avait pas déplacement mais non-retour illicite après le 5 mars 1993. Elle ordonna le retour de l'enfant. Voy. : Findlay v. Findlay, 1995 SLT 492, 1994 SCLR 523 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 185].

L'interprétation de la Inner House quant à l'élément international contenu dans le déplacement ou le non-retour reflète celle de la chambre des Lords dans Re H. & Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 115].

Moment du déplacement ou du non-retour

La question du moment à partir duquel il y a déplacement ou non-retour illicite est une question essentiellement factuelle qui devra être résolue par la juridiction saisie de la demande de retour. Cette question est importante dans le cadre de l'application de l'article 12 (1), lorsqu'on n'est pas certain que les 12 mois se sont écoulés depuis l'enlèvement ou lorsqu'il est nécessaire de déterminer si au moment de l'enlèvement la Convention de La Haye était bien applicable entre l'État de la résidence habituelle de l'enfant et l'État de refuge.

Portée internationale

Plusieurs tribunaux de plusieurs États contractants ont considéré la question de savoir si le déplacement ou le non-retour commencent au moment où l'enfant est soustrait à la personne en ayant la garde ou seulement au moment où l'enfant quitte l'État de sa résidence habituelle ou est empêché d'y retourner ; cette question a été tranchée de manière uniforme. Les tribunaux ont considéré que la Convention de La Haye ayant pour objet l'enlèvement international et non l'enlèvement interne, le déplacement ou le non-retour n'étaient illicites qu'à partir du moment où le problème n'était pas ou plus purement interne.

Australie
Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 113]

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ; Kay J. a confirmé qu'aux fins de l'article 12 le délai ne commence à courir qu'à partir du moment où l'enfant arrive dans l'État de refuge.

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ; Kay J. a affirmé que pour déterminer le délai avec précision il fallait le calculer en prenant en compte l'heure locale du lieu d'où l'enfant s'était vu déplacer illicitement.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re H.; Re S. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 All ER 230, [1991] 2 FLR 262, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 115]. 

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 184],

Toutefois, dans une affaire ancienne, Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SC 55, 1987 SLT 568, 1987 SCLR 344, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 116], les parties s'accordaient à dire que le déplacement à prendre en compte commençait au moment où l'enfant avait été soustrait à la garde d'un des parents en disposant et non pas seulement au moment où il avait quitté le territoire de l'État de sa résidence habituelle.

Dans l'affaire israélienne Family Application 000111/07 Ploni v. Almonit, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 938], le Tribunal ne trouva pas d'accord sur cette question. Un juge estima que la date du déplacement était celle à laquelle l'enfant avait quitté l'État de sa résidence habituelle, l'autre considérant que la date du déplacement était celle de l'arrivée de l'enfant en Israël.

Information concernant l'intention de ne pas rendre l'enfant

Différentes positions ont été adoptées concernant la question de savoir si le non-retour commence à partir du moment où l'une des deux personnes disposant de la garde d'un enfant décide de ne pas le rendre à l'autre personne partageant la garde ou uniquement lorsque cette deuxième  personne apprend l'intention de la première de ne pas lui rendre l'enfant ou que cette intention lui est expressément communiquée.

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Dans l'affaire Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Wrongful Retention) [1994] Fam 70, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 117], la High Court anglaise était disposée à accepter le fait qu'une décision non communiquée par le parent ravisseur pouvait constituer en soi un non-retour illicite.

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50] : le non-retour illicite de l'enfant n'a pas pour point de départ le moment où la mère a décidé unilatéralement de ne pas rendre l'enfant. Ce fait n'était qu'une intention non communiquée de ne pas rendre l'enfant à l'avenir ; intention sur laquelle elle aurait encore pu revenir. Le non retour aurait pu commencer à partir de la date à laquelle la tante a déposé une demande ex parte de résidence et une Ordonnance sur les mesures interdites (prohibited steps orders).

États-Unis d'Amérique
Slagenweit v. Slagenweit, 841 F. Supp. 264 (N.D. Iowa 1993), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 143].
 
Le non-retour illicite a uniquement commencé à partir du moment où la mère a communiqué clairement son désir d'obtenir à nouveau la garde de l'enfant et a revendiqué son droit parental à vivre avec son enfant.

Zuker v. Andrews, 2 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. Mass. 1998) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKf 122], la District Court for the District of Massachusetts des États-Unis d'Amérique a considéré qu'un non-retour se produit lorsque le parent gardien dépossédé constate objectivement le non-retour de l'enfant.

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

La Cour d'appel a considéré qu'en dernière analyse il n'était pas nécessaire de se prononcer sur la question de savoir si le non-retour de l'enfant relevait ou non de la Convention jusqu'à ce que l'un des parents exprime clairement son désir de récupérer le droit de garde, mais elle a assumé que cette norme s'appliquait.

Résidence habituelle

L'interprétation de la notion centrale de résidence habituelle (préambule, art. 3 et 4) s'est révélée particulièrement problématique ces dernières années, des divergences apparaissant dans divers États contractants. Une approche uniforme fait défaut quant à la question de savoir ce qui doit être au cœur de l'analyse : l'enfant seul, l'enfant ainsi que l'intention des personnes disposant de sa garde, ou simplement l'intention de ces personnes. En conséquence notamment de cette différence d'approche, la notion de résidence peut apparaître comme un élément de rattachement très flexible dans certains États contractants ou un facteur de rattachement plus rigide et représentatif d'une résidence à long terme dans d'autres.

L'analyse du concept de résidence habituelle est par ailleurs compliquée par le fait que les décisions concernent des situations factuelles très diverses. La question de la résidence habituelle peut se poser à l'occasion d'un déménagement permanent à l'étranger, d'un déménagement consistant en un test d'une durée illimitée ou potentiellement illimitée ou simplement d'un séjour à l'étranger de durée déterminée.

Tendances générales:

La jurisprudence des cours d'appel fédérales américaines illustre la grande variété d'interprétations données au concept de résidence habituelle.
Approche centrée sur l'enfant

La cour d'appel fédérale des États-Unis d'Amérique du 6e ressort s'est prononcée fermement en faveur d'une approche centrée sur l'enfant seul :

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F.2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993) (6th Cir. 1993) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 142]

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/US 935]

Voir aussi :

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 221].

Approche combinée des liens de l'enfant et de l'intention parentale

Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis d'Amérique des 3e et 8e ressorts ont privilégié une méthode où les liens de l'enfant avec le pays ont été lus à la lumière de l'intention parentale conjointe.
Le jugement de référence est le suivant : Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 83].

Voir aussi :

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 530] ;

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 879].

Dans cette dernière espèce, une distinction a été pratiquée entre la situation d'enfants très jeunes (où une importance plus grande est attachée à l'intention des parents - voir par exemple : Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 808]) et celle d'enfants plus âgés pour lesquels l'intention parentale joue un rôle plus limité.

Approche centrée sur l'intention parentale

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, la Cour d'appel fédérale du 9e ressort a rendu une décision dans l'affaire Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 301], qui s'est révélée très influente en exigeant la présence d'une intention ferme d'abandonner une résidence préexistante pour qu'un enfant puisse acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle.

Cette interprétation a été reprise et précisée par d'autres décisions rendues en appel par des juridictions fédérales de sorte qu'en l'absence d'intention commune des parents en cas de départ pour l'étranger, la résidence habituelle a été maintenue dans le pays d'origine, alors même que l'enfant a passé une période longue à l'étranger.  Voir par exemple :

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009 (9th Cir 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 777] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour prévu de 4 ans en Allemagne ;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 780] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 32 mois au Mexique ;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001) [INCADAT : HC/E/USf 482] : Résidence habituelle maintenue aux États-Unis d'Amérique malgré un séjour de 27 mois en Grèce.

La décision rendue dans l'affaire Mozes a également été approuvée par les cours fédérales d'appel du 2e et du 7e ressort :

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124 (2nd Cir. 2005) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 776] ;

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (2006 7th Cir.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 878] ;

Il convient de noter que dans l'affaire Mozes, la Cour a reconnu que si suffisamment de temps s'est écoulé et que l'enfant a vécu une expérience positive, la vie de l'enfant peut être si fermement attachée à son nouveau milieu qu'une nouvelle résidence habituelle doit pouvoir y être acquise nonobstant l'intention parentale contraire.

Autres États contractants

Dans d'autres États contractants, la position a évolué :

Autriche
La Cour suprême d'Autriche a décidé qu'une résidence de plus de six mois dans un État sera généralement caractérisée de résidence habituelle, quand bien même elle aurait lieu contre la volonté du gardien de l'enfant (puisqu'il s'agit d'une détermination factuelle du centre de vie).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canada
Au Québec, au contraire, l'approche est centrée sur l'enfant :
Dans Droit de la famille 3713, No 500-09-010031-003 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 651], la Cour d'appel de Montréal a décidé que la résidence habituelle d'un enfant est simplement une question de fait qui doit s'apprécier à la lumière de toutes les circonstances particulières de l'espèce en fonction de la réalité vécue par l'enfant en question, et non celle de ses parents. Le séjour doit être d'une durée non négligeable (nécessaire au développement de liens par l'enfant et à son intégration dans son nouveau milieu) et continue, aussi l'enfant doit-il avoir un lien réel et actif avec sa résidence; cependant, aucune durée minimale ne peut être formulée.

Allemagne
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort également de la jurisprudence allemande :

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale a ainsi admis qu'une résidence habituelle puisse être acquise bien que l'enfant ait été illicitement déplacé dans le nouvel État de résidence :

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

La Cour constitutionnelle a confirmé l'analyse de la Cour régionale d'appel selon laquelle les enfants avaient acquis leur résidence habituelle en France malgré la nature de leur déplacement là-bas. La Cour a en effet considéré  que la résidence habituelle était un concept factuel, et les enfants s'étaient intégrés dans leur milieu local pendant les neuf mois qu'ils y avaient vécu.

Israël
Des approches alternatives ont été adoptées lors de la détermination de la résidence habituelle. Il est arrivé qu'un poids important ait été accordé à l'intention parentale. Voir :

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865] ;

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

Cependant, il a parfois été fait référence à une approche plus centrée sur l'enfant. Voir :

décision de la Cour suprême dans C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241 ;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/IL 922].

Nouvelle-Zélande
Contrairement à l'approche privilégiée dans l'affaire Mozes, la cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Zélande a expressément rejeté l'idée que pour acquérir une nouvelle résidence habituelle, il convient d'avoir l'intention ferme de renoncer à la résidence habituelle précédente. Voir :

S.K. v. K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590 [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suisse
Une approche factuelle et centrée sur l'enfant ressort de la jurisprudence suisse :

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Royaume-Uni
L'approche standard est de considérer conjointement la ferme intention des personnes ayant la charge de l'enfant et la réalité vécue par l'enfant.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Référence INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Pour un commentaire doctrinal des différentes approches du concept de résidence habituelle dans les pays de common law. Voir :

R. Schuz, « Habitual Residence of  Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice », Child and Family Law Quarterly, Vol. 13, No1, 2001, p.1 ;

R. Schuz, « Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context » Journal of Transnational Law and Policy, Vol. 11, 2001, p. 101.

Hechos

El menor tenía 5 años y ocho meses en la fecha de la supuesta retención ilícita. Había vivido en Canadá toda su vida. Durante el juicio de separación, los padres decidieron que el menor viviría en Escocia con el padre durante cuatro meses. El 5 de noviembre de 1992, el padre se llevó al menor a Escocia. Su regreso estaba programado para el 5 de marzo de 1993.

El 9 de febrero de 1993, la madre solicitó ante un tribunal de Ontario la custodia de los cuatro hijos del matrimonio y la restitución del menor a Canadá. El 7 de mayo de 1993, se hizo lugar a esta solicitud.

El 28 de septiembre de 1993, la Outer House of the Court of Session (Cámara Externa del Tribunal Superior de Justicia) en Escocia ordenó la restitución del menor sobre la base de que el consentimiento de la madre había sido únicamente por un período limitado y que la retención posterior fue ilícita. El padre apeló.

Fallo

Moción de reclamo -reclaiming motion- (apelación) permitida; caso remitido a la Outer House of the Court of Session (Cámara Externa del Tribunal Superior de Justicia) para decidir sobre las cuestiones de retención ilícita y residencia habitual.

Comentario INCADAT

Cuando se remitió a la Outer House (Cámara Externa), se sostuvo que no había existido traslado ilícito pero sí una retención ilícita luego del 5 de marzo de 1993. Se ordenó la restitución del menor; véase Findlay v. Findlay, 1995 SLT 492, 1994 SCLR 523 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 185].

La interpretación de la Inner House (Cámara Interna) con respecto al elemento internacional de un traslado o retención refleja la interpretación de la House of Lords (Cámara de los Lores) en Re H. and Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 115].

Momento del traslado y retención

Inicialmente, esta cuestión de hecho incumbe al tribunal que haya tomado conocimiento de la solicitud de restitución. El problema puede tener relevancia cuando existen dudas sobre si el plazo de 12 meses al que se hace referencia en al artículo 12(1) ha vencido, o si hay incertidumbre respecto de si el acto presuntamente ilícito ha ocurrido antes o después de la entrada en vigor del Convenio entre el Estado de residencia habitual del menor y el Estado de refugio.

Ámbito internacional

Una cuestión jurídica que se ha suscitado y se ha resuelto con poca controversia en varios Estados está ligada al hecho de que el Convenio solo se ocupa de la protección internacional de menores trasladados o retenidos ilícitamente, y no del traslado o la retención de menores dentro del Estado de su residencia habitual. El traslado o la retención en cuestión debe necesariamente ser de la jurisdicción de los tribunales del Estado de residencia habitual del menor y no simplemente del cuidado de quien detenta la titularidad de los derechos de custodia.

Australia

Murray v. Director, Family Services (1993) FLC 92-416, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 113];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232]; 

State Central Authority v. C.R. [2005] Fam CA 1050, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/AU 232];

Reino Unido - Inglaterra y Gales

Re H.; Re S. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1991] 2 AC 476, [1991] 3 All ER 230, [1991] 2 FLR 262, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 115];

Reino Unido – Escocia

Findlay v. Findlay 1994 SLT 709, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 184].

Sin embargo, en una de las causas más tempranas, Kilgour v. Kilgour 1987 SC 55, 1987 SLT 568, 1987 SCLR 344, [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/UKs 116], las partes estaban de acuerdo en proceder sobre la base de que el traslado pertinente a los fines del Convenio comenzó con el traslado en violación de los derechos de custodia más que con el traslado del país donde el menor había vivido previamente.

En la causa israelí, Family Application 000111/07 Ploni vs. Almonit [Cita INCADAT: HC/E/IL 938], no se llegó a ningún acuerdo sobre el inicio del traslado. Un juez aceptó que la fecha pertinente era la fecha del traslado del Estado de residencia habitual mientras que el otro adoptó la opinión de que era la fecha de llegada a Israel.

Comunicación de la intención de no regresar al niño

Existen distintas posturas sobre si la retención comienza en el momento en que una persona decide no regresar al niño, o si comienza cuando el otro titular de derechos de custodia se entera de la intención de no regresar o esa intención le es comunicada.

Reino Unido – Inglaterra y Gales

En el asunto Re S. (Minors) (Abduction: Wrongful Retention) [1994] Fam 70, [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 117], el High Court inglés estaba dispuesto a aceptar que una decisión del padre sustractor, que no había sido comunicada, podía constituir un acto de retención ilícita.

Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 50]: el momento en que la madre decidió unilateralmente no regresar al niño no fue el momento en que la retención se convirtió en ilícita. No era más que una intención de retener al niño en el futuro, que no fue comunicada, la que podría haber revertido. La retención podría haber comenzado en la fecha en que la tía presentó, inaudita parte, una solicitud de residencia y una orden de protección.

Estados Unidos de América

Slagenweit v. Slagenweit, 841 F. Supp. 264 (N.D. Iowa 1993), [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 143].

La retención ilícita solo comenzó cuando la madre comunicó claramente su intención de obtener nuevamente la custodia e invocó su derecho parental de vivir con su hija.

Zuker v. Andrews, 2 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. Mass. 1998) [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKf 122], el Tribunal Federal de Distrito de Massachusetts estimó que la retención comienza cuando el padre custodio privado del niño constata objetivamente que el niño no regresará.

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

El Tribunal de Apelaciones estimó que, en última instancia, no es necesario pronunciarse sobre si el niño fue retenido o no según el Convenio hasta que un padre comunica de manera inequívoca su intención de recuperar su derecho de custodia. Sin embargo, asumió que esta norma era aplicable.

Residencia habitual

La interpretación del concepto central de residencia habitual (Preámbulo, art. 3, art. 4) ha demostrado ser cada vez más problemática en años recientes con interpretaciones divergentes que surgen de distintos Estados contratantes. No hay uniformidad respecto de si al momento de determinar la residencia habitual el énfasis debe estar sobre el niño exclusivamente, prestando atención a las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor, o si debe estar primordialmente en las intenciones de las personas a cargo del cuidado del menor. Al menos en parte como resultado, la residencia habitual puede parecer constituir un factor de conexión muy flexible en algunos Estados contratantes y mucho más rígido y reflejo de la residencia a largo plazo en otros.

La valoración de la interpretación de residencia habitual se torna aún más complicada por el hecho de que los casos que se concentran en el concepto pueden involucrar situaciones fácticas muy diversas. A modo de ejemplo, la residencia habitual puede tener que considerarse como consecuencia de una mudanza permanente, o una mudanza más tentativa, aunque tenga una duración indefinida o potencialmente indefinida, o la mudanza pueda ser, de hecho, por un plazo de tiempo definido.

Tendencias generales:

La jurisprudencia de los tribunales federales de apelación de los Estados Unidos de América puede tomarse como ejemplo de la amplia gama de interpretaciones existentes en lo que respecta a la residencia habitual.

Enfoque centrado en el menor

El Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 6º Circuito ha apoyado firmemente el enfoque centrado en el menor en la determinación de la residencia habitual.

Friedrich v. Friedrich, 983 F. 2d 1396, 125 ALR Fed. 703 (6th Cir. 1993), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/Ee/USF 142];

Robert v. Tesson, 507 F.3d 981 (6th Cir. 2007) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/US 935].

Veáse también:

Villalta v. Massie, No. 4:99cv312-RH (N.D. Fla. Oct. 27, 1999) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 221].

Enfoque combinado: conexión del menor / intención de los padres

Los Tribunales Federales de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América de los 3º y 8º  Circuitos han adoptado un enfoque centrado en el menor pero que igualmente tiene en cuenta las intenciones compartidas de los padres.

El fallo clave es el del caso: Feder v. Evans-Feder, 63 F.3d 217 (3d Cir. 1995), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 83].

Veánse también:

Silverman v. Silverman, 338 F.3d 886 (8th Cir. 2003), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 530];

Karkkainen v. Kovalchuk, 445 F.3d 280 (3rd Cir. 2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 879].

En este último asunto se estableció una distinción entre las situaciones que involucran a niños muy pequeños, en las cuales se atribuye especial importancia a las intenciones de los padres (véase por ejemplo: Baxter v. Baxter, 423 F.3d 363 (3rd Cir. 2005) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 808]) y aquellas que involucran a niños más mayores, donde el impacto de las intenciones de los padres ya es más limitado.

Enfoque centrado en la intención de los padres

El fallo del Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Estados Unidos de América del 9º Circuito en Mozes v. Mozes, 239 F.3d 1067 (9th Cir. 2001) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 301] ha sido altamente influyente al disponer que, por lo general, debería haber una intención establecida de abandonar una residencia habitual antes de que un menor pueda adquirir una nueva.

Esta interpretación ha sido adoptada y desarrollada en otras sentencias de tribunales federales de apelación, de modo tal que la ausencia de intención compartida de los padres respecto del objeto de la mudanza derivó en la conservación de la residencia habitual vigente, aunque el menor hubiera estado fuera de dicho Estado durante un período de tiempo extenso. Véanse por ejemplo:

Holder v. Holder, 392 F.3d 1009, 1014 (9th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 777]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos luego de 8 meses de una estadía intencional de cuatro años en Alemania;

Ruiz v. Tenorio, 392 F.3d 1247, 1253 (11th Cir. 2004) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 780]: Conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 32 meses en México;

Tsarbopoulos v. Tsarbopoulos, 176 F. Supp.2d 1045 (E.D. Wash. 2001), [Referencai INCADAT: HC/E/USf 482]: conservación de la residencia habitual en los Estados Unidos durante una estadía de 27 meses en Grecia;

El enfoque en el asunto Mozes ha sido aprobado asimismo por el Tribunal Federal de Apelaciones de los Circuitos 2º y 7º:

Gitter v. Gitter, 396 F.3d 124, 129-30 (2d Cir. 2005), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 776];

Koch v. Koch, 450 F.3d 703 (7th Cir.2006), [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/USf 878].

Con respecto al enfoque aplicado en el asunto Mozes, cabe destacar que el 9º Circuito sí reconoció que, con tiempo suficiente y una experiencia positiva, la vida de un menor podría integrarse tan firmemente en el nuevo país de manera de pasar a tener residencia habitual allí sin perjuicio de las intenciones en contrario que pudieren tener los padres.

Otros Estados

Hay diferencias en los enfoques que adoptan otros Estados.

Austria
La Corte Suprema de Austria ha establecido que un periodo de residencia superior a seis meses en un Estado será considerado generalmente residencia habitual, aún en el caso en que sea contra la voluntad de la persona que se encarga del cuidado del niño (ya que se trata de una determinación fáctica del centro de su vida).

8Ob121/03g, Oberster Gerichtshof [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/AT 548].

Canadá
En la Provincia de Quebec se adopta un enfoque centrado en el menor:

En el asunto Droit de la famille 3713, N° 500-09-010031-003 [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CA 651], el Tribunal de Apelaciones de Montreal sostuvo que la determinación de la residencia habitual de un menor es una cuestión puramente fáctica que debe resolverse a la luz de las circunstancias del caso, teniendo en cuenta la realidad de la vida del menor, más que a la de sus padres. El plazo de residencia efectiva debe ser por un período de tiempo significativo e ininterrumpido y el menor debe tener un vínculo real y activo con el lugar. Sin embargo, no se establece un período de residencia mínimo.

Alemania
En la jurisprudencia alemana se evidencia asimismo un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

2 UF 115/02, Oberlandesgericht Karlsruhe [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 944].

Esto condujo a que el Tribunal Federal Constitucional aceptara que la residencia habitual se puede adquirir sin perjuicio de que el niño haya sido trasladado de forma ilícita al nuevo Estado de residencia:

Bundesverfassungsgericht, 2 BvR 1206/98, 29. Oktober 1998  [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/DE 233].

El Tribunal Constitucional confirmó la decisión del Tribunal Regional de Apelaciones por la que se estableció que los niños habían adquirido residencia habitual en Francia, sin perjuicio de la naturaleza de su traslado a ese lugar. La fundamentación consistió en que la residencia habitual es un concepto fáctico y que durante los nueve meses que estuvieron allí, los niños se integraron al entorno local.

Israel
En este país se adoptaron enfoques alternativos para determinar la residencia habitual del niño. Algunas veces se ha puesto bastante atención en las intenciones de los padres. Véanse:

Family Appeal 1026/05 Ploni v. Almonit [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 865];

Family Application 042721/06 G.K. v Y.K. [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 939].

No obstante, en otros casos se ha hecho referencia a un enfoque más centrado en el menor. Véase:

decisión de la Corte Suprema en C.A. 7206/03, Gabai v. Gabai, P.D. 51(2)241;

FamA 130/08 H v H [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/Il 922].

Nueva Zelanda
Asimismo, cabe destacar que, a diferencia del enfoque adoptado en Mozes, la mayoría de los miembros del Tribunal de Apelaciones de Nueva Zelanda rechazó expresamente la idea de que para adquirir una nueva residencia habitual se deba tener una intención establecida de abandonar la residencia habitual vigente. Véase:

S.K. v K.P. [2005] 3 NZLR 590, [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/NZ 816].

Suiza
En la jurisprudencia suiza se puede ver un enfoque fáctico centrado en la vida del menor:

5P.367/2005/ast, Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung (Tribunal Fédéral, 2ème Chambre Civile) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/CH 841].

Reino Unido
El enfoque estándar consiste en considerar la intención establecida de las personas que se encargan del cuidado del menor en consonancia con la realidad fáctica de la vida de aquel.

Re J. (A Minor) (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1990] 2 AC 562, [1990] 2 All ER 961, [1990] 2 FLR 450, sub nom C. v. S. (A Minor) (Abduction) [Referencia INCADAT: HC/E/UKe 2].

Para una opinión doctrinaria acerca de los diferentes enfoques sobre el concepto de residencia habitual en los países del common law, véanse:

R. Schuz, Habitual Residence of Children under the Hague Child Abduction Convention: Theory and Practice, Child and Family Law Quarterly Vol 13 1 (2001) 1.

R. Schuz, Policy Considerations in Determining Habitual Residence of a Child and the Relevance of Context, Journal of Transnational Law and Policy Vol. 11, 101 (2001).