CASE

No full text available

Case Name

Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (Application No 41615/07)

INCADAT reference

HC/E/CH 1001

Court

Name

European Court of Human Rights

Level

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR)

Judge(s)
Christos Rozakis (President); Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, George Nicolaou (Judges); Søren Nielsen (Section Registrar)

States involved

Requesting State

ISRAEL

Requested State

SWITZERLAND

Decision

Date

8 January 2009

Status

Final

Grounds

-

Order

Application dismissed

HC article(s) Considered

3 13(1)(b)

HC article(s) Relied Upon

3 13(1)(b)

Other provisions
Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Authorities | Cases referred to
Maumousseau et Washington c. France, no 39388/05, §§ 58-83, CEDH 2007; Bianchi c. Suisse, no 7548/04, §§ 76-85, 22 juin 2006; Monory c. Roumanie et Hongrie, no 71099/01, §§ 69-85, 5 avril 2005; Eskinazi et Chelouche c. Turquie (déc.), no 14600/05, CEDH 2005 XIII (extraits); Karadžic c. Croatie, no 35030/04, §§ 51-54, 15 décembre 2005; Iglesias Gil et A.U.I. c. Espagne, no 56673/00, §§ 48-52, CEDH 2003 V; Sylvester c. Autriche, nos 36812/97 et 40104/98, §§ 55-60, 24 avril 2003; Paradis c. Allemagne, (déc.), no 4783/03, 15 mai 2003; Guichard c. France (déc.), no 56838/00, CEDH 2003 X; Ignaccolo-Zenide c. Roumanie, no 31679/96, §§ 94-96, CEDH 2000 I; Tiemann c. France et Allemagne (déc.), nos 47457/99 et 47458/99, CEDH 2000-IV.

INCADAT comment

Aims & Scope of the Convention

Convention Aims
Convention Aims

Article 12 Return Mechanism

Rights of Custody
What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Exceptions to Return

General Issues
Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Inter-Relationship with International / Regional Instruments and National Law

European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR)
European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

SUMMARY

Summary available in EN | FR

Facts

The application related to a child born in Israel in 2003 to a Swiss mother and an Israeli father. The parents had married in Israel in 2001. After the birth the mother alleged that the father had joined a radical, ultra-orthodox Jewish sect.

Given her fears that the father would take the child abroad to a community of the sect, the mother sought and obtained in June 2004 an order prohibiting the removal of the child from the jurisdiction. The order was to endure throughout the minority of the child.

The parents divorced in February 2005. A pre-existing provisional custody order of 27 June 2004 was not amended. This recognized both parents as guardians, but the mother was given custody, the father access.

On 20 March 2005 an arrest warrant was issued against the father for non-payment of maintenance. On 27 March 2005 the mother failed in an attempt to have the non-removal order lifted. On 24 June 2005 the mother secretly took the child to Switzerland. Their location was discovered in May 2006.

On 30 May 2006 the Family Court in Tel Aviv issued an order confirming the removal to have been wrongful. On 8 June 2006 the father filed his return petition. On 29 June the Justice of the Peace for the district of Lausanne, Switzerland declined to order the return of the child, finding the grave risk of harm exception to have been established.

On 22 May 2007 the Cantonal Court in Vaud, Switzerland dismissed the father's appeal, again relying on Article 13(1)(b).

On 16 August 2007 the Swiss Federal Court ordered the return of the child, finding no basis for a grave risk of harm (5A_285/2007 /frs [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 955]). On 26 September 2007 mother and child petitioned the European Court of Human Rights.

On 27 September 2007 the President of the Chamber indicated to the Swiss Government, on the basis of Art 39 of the Rules of the Court (Interim Measures), not to proceed with the return of the child. On 1 October the father withdrew his application for enforcement.

Ruling

By a 4:3 majority the European Court of Human Rights ruled that there had not been a breach of the mother and child's right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

INCADAT comment

See also the decision of the Grand Chamber in this case dated 6 July 2010: Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/ 1323].

Convention Aims

Courts in all Contracting States must inevitably make reference to and evaluate the aims of the Convention if they are to understand the purpose of the instrument, and so be guided in how its concepts should be interpreted and provisions applied.

The 1980 Hague Child Abduction Convention, explicitly and implicitly, embodies a range of aims and objectives, positive and negative, as it seeks to achieve a delicate balance between the competing interests of the central actors; the child, the left behind parent and the abducting parent, see for example the discussion in the decision of the Canadian Supreme Court: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 17].

Article 1 identifies the core aims, namely that the Convention seeks:
"a) to secure the prompt return of children wrongfully removed to or retained in any Contracting State; and
 b) to ensure that rights of custody and of access under the law of one Contracting State are effectively respected in the other Contracting States."

Further clarification, most notably to the primary purpose of achieving the return of children where their removal or retention has led to the breach of actually exercised rights of custody, is given in the Preamble.

Therein it is recorded that:

"the interests of children are of paramount importance in matters relating to their custody;

and that States signatory desire:

 to protect children internationally from the harmful effects of their wrongful removal or retention;

 to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to the State of their habitual residence; and

 to secure protection for rights of access."

The aim of return and the manner in which it should best be achieved is equally reinforced in subsequent Articles, notably in the duties required of Central Authorities (Arts 8-10) and in the requirement for judicial authorities to act expeditiously (Art. 11).

Article 13, along with Articles 12(2) and 20, which contain the exceptions to the summary return mechanism, indicate that the Convention embodies an additional aim, namely that in certain defined circumstances regard may be paid to the specific situation, including the best interests, of the individual child or even taking parent.

The Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report draws (at para. 19) attention to an implicit aim on which the Convention rests, namely that any debate on the merits of custody rights should take place before the competent authorities in the State where the child had his habitual residence prior to its removal, see for example:

Argentina
W., E. M. c. O., M. G., Supreme Court, June 14, 1995 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/AR 362]
 
Finland
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FI 839]

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 janvier 2007, No de RG 06/002739 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/FR 947]

Israel
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/IL 214]

Netherlands
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NL 316]

Switzerland
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 décembre 2007 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CH 986]

United Kingdom - Scotland
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKs 996]

United States of America
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 125]
 
The Pérez-Vera Report equally articulates the preventive dimension to the instrument's return aim (at paras. 17, 18, 25), a goal which was specifically highlighted during the ratification process of the Convention in the United States (see: Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) and which has subsequently been relied upon in that Contracting State when applying the Convention, see:

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 741]

Applying the principle of equitable tolling where an abducted child had been concealed was held to be consistent with the purpose of the Convention to deter child abduction.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 578]

In contrast to other federal Courts of Appeals, the 11th Circuit was prepared to interpret a ne exeat right as including the right to determine a child's place of residence since the goal of the Hague Convention was to deter international abduction and the ne exeat right provided a parent with decision-making authority regarding the child's international relocation.

In other jurisdictions, deterrence has on occasion been raised as a relevant factor in the interpretation and application of the Convention, see for example:

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 754]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 50]

Aims and objectives may equally rise to prominence during the life of the instrument, such as the promotion of transfrontier contact, which it has been submitted will arise by virtue of a strict application of the Convention's summary return mechanism, see:

New Zealand
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/NZ 296]

United Kingdom - England and Wales
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 60]

There is no hierarchy between the different aims of the Convention (Pérez-Vera Explanatory Report, at para. 18).  Judicial interpretation may therefore differ as between Contracting States as more or less emphasis is placed on particular objectives.  Equally jurisprudence may evolve, whether internally or internationally.

In United Kingdom case law (England and Wales) a decision of that jurisdiction's then supreme jurisdiction, the House of Lords, led to a reappraisal of the Convention's aims and consequently a re-alignment in court practice as regards the exceptions:

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

Previously a desire to give effect to the primary goal of promoting return and thereby preventing an over-exploitation of the exceptions, had led to an additional test of exceptionality being added to the exceptions, see for example:

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 901]

It was this test of exceptionality which was subsequently held to be unwarranted by the House of Lords in Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288 [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/UKe 937]

- Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine:

In United States Convention case law different approaches have been taken in respect of applicants who have or are alleged to have themselves breached court orders under the "fugitive disentitlement doctrine".

In Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 150], the fugitive disentitlement doctrine was applied, the applicant father in the Convention application having left the United States to escape his criminal conviction and other responsibilities to the United States courts.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. July 25, 2000) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 326]

In the instant case the father was a fugitive. Secondly, it was arguable there was some connection between his fugitive status and the petition. But the court found that the connection not to be strong enough to support the application of the doctrine. In any event, the court also held that applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine would impose too severe a sanction in a case involving parental rights.

In March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/USf 386], the doctrine was not applied where the applicant was in breach of civil orders.

In the Canadian case Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [INCADAT Reference: HC/E/CA 760], the father's fugitive status was held to be a factor in there being a grave risk of harm facing the child.

Author: Peter McEleavy

What is a Right of Custody for Convention Purposes?

Courts in an overwhelming majority of Contracting States have accepted that a right of veto over the removal of the child from the jurisdiction amounts to a right of custody for Convention purposes, see:

Australia
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 232];

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AU 294];

Austria
2 Ob 596/91, OGH, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [INCADAT cite: HC/E/AT 375];

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 11].

The Supreme Court did draw a distinction between a non-removal clause in an interim custody order and in a final order. It suggested that were a non-removal clause in a final custody order to be regarded as a custody right for Convention purposes, that could have serious implications for the mobility rights of the primary carer.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 12];

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA 334];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 34];

Re D. (A Child) (Abduction: Foreign Custody Rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 880];

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [INCADAT cite: HC/E/FR 62];

Germany
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 338];

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/DE 486];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 803];

South Africa
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ZA 309];

Switzerland
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CH 427].

United States of America
In the United States, the Federal Courts of Appeals were divided on the appropriate interpretation to give between 2000 and 2010.

A majority followed the 2nd Circuit in adopting a narrow interpretation, see:

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 313];

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 493];

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 494];

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 989].

The 11th Circuit however endorsed the standard international interpretation.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 578].

The matter was settled, at least where an applicant parent has a right to decide the child's country of residence, or the court in the State of habitual residence is seeking to protect its own jurisdiction pending further decrees, by the US Supreme Court endorsing the standard international interpretation. 

Abbott v. Abbott, 130 S. Ct. 1983 (2010), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/USf 1029].

The standard international interpretation has equally been accepted by the European Court of Human Rights, see:

Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1001].

Confirmed by the Grand Chamber: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1323].


Right to Object to a Removal

Where an individual does not have a right of veto over the removal of a child from the jurisdiction, but merely a right to object and to apply to a court to prevent such a removal, it has been held in several jurisdictions that this is not enough to amount to a custody right for Convention purposes:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [INCADAT cite: HC/E/CA17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/IE 271];

United Kingdom - England & Wales
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKe 36];

United Kingdom - Scotland
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [INCADAT cite: HC/E/UKs 188].

This interpretation has also been upheld by the Court of Justice of the European Union:
Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [INCADAT cite: HC/E/ 1104].

The European Court held that to find otherwise would be incompatible with the requirements of legal certainty and with the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others, notably those of the sole custodian.

For academic commentary see:

P. Beaumont & P. McEleavy The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq.;

M. Bailey The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention; Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287;

C. Whitman 'Croll v Croll: The Second Circuit Limits 'Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction' 2001 Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law 605.

Limited Nature of the Exceptions

Preparation of INCADAT case law analysis in progress.

European Court of Human Rights (ECrtHR) Judgments

Faits

La demande concernait un enfant né en Israël en 2003 d'une mère suisse et d'un père israélien. Les parents s'étaient mariés en Israël en 2001. Après la naissance de l'enfant, la mère a affirmé que le père avait rejoint une secte juive ultra-orthodoxe radicale.

En juin 2004, craignant que le père n'emmène l'enfant à l'étranger dans une communauté rattachée à la secte, la mère a demandé et obtenu une ordonnance interdisant le déplacement de ce dernier en dehors de la juridiction. L'ordonnance était établie jusqu'à la majorité de l'enfant.

Les parents ont divorcé en février 2005. L'ordonnance de garde provisoire préexistante du 27 juin 2004 n'a pas été modifiée ; elle reconnaissait une autorité parentale conjointe mais la mère avait la garde et le père un droit de visite.

Le 20 mars 2005, un mandat d'arrêt a été émis contre le père pour non-paiement de la pension alimentaire. Le 27 mars 2005, la mère a voulu faire lever l'ordonnance de non-déplacement ; sa demande a été rejetée. Le 24 juin 2005, la mère a secrètement emmené l'enfant en Suisse. Elle a été localisée en mai 2006.

Le 30 mai 2006, le Tribunal de la famille de Tel Aviv a émis une ordonnance confirmant que le déplacement était illicite. Le 8 juin 2006, le père a introduit une demande de retour. Le 29 juin, le juge de paix du district de Lausanne (Suisse) a refusé d'ordonner le retour de l'enfant, estimant que l'exception de risque grave était établie.

Le 22 mai 2007, le Tribunal cantonal de Vaud (Suisse) s'est également fondé sur l'article 13(1)(b) pour rejeter l'appel formé par le père.

Le 16 août 2007, le Tribunal fédéral suisse a ordonné le retour de l'enfant, estimant que le risque grave n'était pas fondé (5A_285/2007 /frs [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 955]). Le 26 septembre 2007, la mère et l'enfant ont porté l'affaire devant la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme.

Le 27 septembre, le Président de la Chambre a fait savoir au Gouvernement suisse qu'il ne devait pas poursuivre la procédure de retour, conformément à l'article 39 du Règlement de la Cour (Mesures provisoires). Le 1er octobre, le père a retiré sa demande d'exécution.

Dispositif

À la majorité de 4 voix contre 3, la Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a jugé qu'il n'y avait pas eu violation du droit de la mère et de l'enfant au respect de leur vie familiale tel que visé à l'article 8 de la Convention européenne des droits de l'homme.

Commentaire INCADAT

Voir aussi dans cette affaire la décision de la Grande Chambre du 6 juillet 2010: Neulinger et Shuruk c. Suisse, No 41615/07 [Référence INCADAT HC/E/AT 1323].

Objectifs de la Convention

Les juridictions de tous les États contractants doivent inévitablement se référer aux objectifs de la Convention et les évaluer si elles veulent comprendre le but de cet instrument et être ainsi guidées quant à la manière d'interpréter ses notions et d'appliquer ses dispositions.

La Convention de La Haye de 1980 sur l'enlèvement d'enfants comprend explicitement et implicitement toute une série de buts et d'objectifs, positifs et négatifs, car elle cherche à établir un équilibre délicat entre les intérêts concurrents des principaux acteurs : l'enfant, le parent délaissé et le parent ravisseur. Voir, par exemple, le débat sur cette question dans la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada: W.(V.) v. S.(D.), (1996) 2 SCR 108, (1996) 134 DLR 4th 481, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 17].

L'article 1 identifie les principaux objectifs, à savoir que la Convention a pour objet :
a) d'assurer le retour immédiat des enfants déplacés ou retenus illicitement dans tout État contractant et
b) de faire respecter effectivement dans les autres États contractants les droits de garde et de visite existant dans un État contractant.

De plus amples détails sont fournis dans le préambule, notamment au sujet de l'objectif premier d'obtenir le retour des enfants, lorsque leur déplacement ou leur rétention a donné lieu à une violation des droits de garde effectivement exercés.  Il y est indiqué que :

L'intérêt de l'enfant est d'une importance primordiale pour toute question relative à sa garde ;

Et les États signataires désirant :
protéger l'enfant, sur le plan international, contre tous les effets nuisibles d'un déplacement ou d'un non-retour illicites et établir des procédures en vue de garantir le retour immédiat de l'enfant dans l'État de sa résidence habituelle et d'assurer la protection du droit de visite.

L'objectif du retour et la manière dont il doit s'effectuer au mieux sont également renforcés dans les articles suivants, notamment en ce qui concerne les obligations des Autorités centrales (art. 8 à 10) et l'obligation faite aux autorités judiciaires de procéder d'urgence (art. 11).

L'article 13, avec les articles 12(2) et 20, qui énonce les exceptions au mécanisme de retour sommaire, indique que la Convention comporte un objectif supplémentaire, à savoir que dans certaines circonstances définies, la situation propre à chaque enfant devrait être prise en compte, notamment l'intérêt supérieur de l'enfant ou même du parent ayant emmené l'enfant. 

Le rapport explicatif de Mme Pérez-Vera attire l'attention au paragraphe 9 sur un objectif implicite sur lequel repose la Convention, à savoir que l'examen au fond des questions relatives aux droits de garde doit se faire par les autorités compétentes de l'État où l'enfant avait sa résidence habituelle avant d'être déplacé, voir par exemple :

Argentine
W. v. O., 14 June 1995, Argentine Supreme Court of Justice, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AR 362];

Finlande
Supreme Court of Finland: KKO:2004:76, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FI 839];

France
CA Bordeaux, 19 January 2007, No 06/002739, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 947];

Israël
T. v. M., 15 April 1992, transcript (Unofficial Translation), Supreme Court of Israel, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/IL 214];

Pays-Bas
X. (the mother) v. De directie Preventie, en namens Y. (the father) (14 April 2000, ELRO nr. AA 5524, Zaaksnr.R99/076HR), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NL 316];

Suisse
5A.582/2007 Bundesgericht, II. Zivilabteilung, 4 December 2007, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 986];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
N.J.C. v. N.P.C. [2008] CSIH 34, 2008 S.C. 571, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 996];

États-Unis d'Amérique
Lops v. Lops, 140 F.3d 927 (11th Cir. 1998), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 125].

Le rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera associe également la dimension préventive à l'objectif de retour de l'instrument (para. 17, 18 et 25), un objectif dont il a beaucoup été question pendant le processus de ratification de la Convention aux États-Unis d'Amérique (voir : Pub. Notice 957, 51 Fed. Reg. 10494, 10505 (1986)) et sur lequel des juges se sont fondés dans cet État contractant dans leur application de la Convention. Voir :

Duarte v. Bardales, 526 F.3d 563 (9th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1023].

Le fait d'appliquer le principe d'« equitable tolling » lorsqu'un enfant enlevé a été dissimulé a été considéré comme cohérent avec l'objectif de la Convention de décourager l'enlèvement d'enfants.

Furnes v. Reeves, 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

À l'inverse des autres instances d'appel fédérales, le tribunal du 11e ressort était prêt à interpréter un droit ne exeat comme incluant le droit de déterminer le lieu de résidence de l'enfant, étant donné que le but de la Convention de La Haye est de prévenir l'enlèvement international et que le droit ne exeat donne au parent le pouvoir de décider du pays où l'enfant prendrait résidence.

Dans d'autres juridictions, la prévention a parfois été invoquée comme facteur pertinent dans l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention. Voir par exemple :

Canada
J.E.A. v. C.L.M. (2002), 220 D.L.R. (4th) 577 (N.S.C.A.), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 754] ;

Royaume-Uni  - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re A.Z. (A Minor) (Abduction: Acquiescence) [1993] 1 FLR 682, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 50].

Des buts et objectifs de la Convention peuvent également se trouver au centre de l'attention pendant la vie de l'instrument, comme la promotion du contact transfrontière, qui, selon des arguments avancés en ce sens, découlent d'une application stricte du mécanisme de retour sommaire de la Convention, voir :

Nouvelle-Zélande
S. v. S. [1999] NZFLR 625, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/NZ 296];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re R. (Child Abduction: Acquiescence) [1995] 1 FLR 716, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 60].

Il n'y a pas de hiérarchie entre les différents objectifs de la Convention (para. 18 du rapport de Mme Pérez-Vera). L'interprétation judiciaire peut ainsi diverger selon les États contractants en fonction de l'accent plus ou moins important qui sera placé sur certains objectifs. La jurisprudence peut également évoluer, sur le plan interne ou international.

Dans la jurisprudence britannique du Royaume-Uni (Angleterre et Pays de Galles), une décision de l'instance suprême de cette juridiction, la Chambre des lords, a donné lieu à une ré-évaluation des objectifs de la Convention et, partant, à un réalignement de la pratique judiciaire en ce qui concerne les exceptions :

Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Précédemment, la volonté de donner effet à l'objectif premier d'encourager le retour et de prévenir ainsi un recours abusif aux exceptions, avait donné lieu à l'ajout d'un critère additionnel du « caractère exceptionnel », voir par exemple :

Re M. (A Child) (Abduction: Child's Objections to Return) [2007] EWCA Civ 260, [2007] 2 FLR 72, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 901].

C'est ce critère du caractère exceptionnel qui fut par la suite considéré comme non fondé par la Chambre des lords dans Re M. (Children) (Abduction: Rights of Custody) [2007] UKHL 55, [2008] 1 AC 1288, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 937].

Doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif

Aux États-Unis d'Amérique, des approches différentes ont été suivies dans la jurisprudence de la Convention à l'égard de demandeurs qui n'ont pas ou n'auraient pas respecté une décision de justice en vertu de la « doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif ».

Dans Re Prevot, 59 F.3d 556 (6th Cir. 1995), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 150], la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif a été appliquée, le père demandeur ayant fui les États-Unis pour échapper à sa condamnation pénale et d'autres responsabilités devant des tribunaux américains.

Walsh v. Walsh, No. 99-1747 (1st Cir. 2000), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 326].

Dans l'espèce, le père était un fugitif. Deuxièmement, on pouvait soutenir qu'il y avait un lien entre son statut de fugitif et la demande. Mais la juridiction conclut que le lien n'était pas assez fort pour que la doctrine ait à s'appliquer. En tout état de cause, la juridiction estima également que le fait d'appliquer la doctrine de la déchéance des droits du fugitif imposerait une sanction trop sévère dans une affaire de droits parentaux.

Dans March v. Levine, 249 F.3d 462 (6th Cir. 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 386], la doctrine n'a pas été appliquée pour ce qui est du non-respect par le demandeur d'ordonnances civiles.

Dans l'affaire canadienne Kovacs v. Kovacs (2002), 59 O.R. (3d) 671 (Sup. Ct.) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 760], le statut de fugitif du père a été considéré comme un facteur à prendre en compte, en ce sens qu'il y avait là un risque grave de danger pour l'enfant.

La notion de droit de garde au sens de la Convention

Les tribunaux d'un nombre très majoritaire d'États considèrent que le droit pour un parent de s'opposer à ce que l'enfant quitte le pays est un droit de garde au sens de la Convention. Voir :

Australie
In the Marriage of Resina [1991] FamCA 33, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 257];

State Central Authority v. Ayob (1997) FLC 92-746, 21 Fam. LR 567 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 232] ;

Director-General Department of Families, Youth and Community Care and Hobbs, 24 September 1999, Family Court of Australia (Brisbane) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AU 294] ;

Autriche
2 Ob 596/91, 05 February 1992, Oberster Gerichtshof [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/AT 375] ;

Canada
Thomson v. Thomson [1994] 3 SCR 551, 6 RFL (4th) 290 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 11] ;

La Cour suprême distingua néanmoins selon que le droit de veto avait été donné dans une décision provisoire ou définitive, suggérant que considérer un droit de veto accordé dans une décision définitive comme un droit de garde aurait d'importantes conséquences sur la mobilité du parent ayant la garde physique de l'enfant.

Thorne v. Dryden-Hall, (1997) 28 RFL (4th) 297 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 12] ;

Decision of 15 December 1998, [1999] R.J.Q. 248 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CA 334] ;

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
C. v. C. (Minor: Abduction: Rights of Custody Abroad) [1989] 1 WLR 654, [1989] 2 All ER 465, [1989] 1 FLR 403, [1989] Fam Law 228 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 34] ;

Re D. (A child) (Abduction: Foreign custody rights) [2006] UKHL 51, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKe 880] ;

France
Ministère Public c. M.B. 79 Rev. crit. 1990, 529, note Y. Lequette [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/FR 62] ;

Allemagne
2 BvR 1126/97, Bundesverfassungsgericht, (Federal Constitutional Court), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 338] ;

10 UF 753/01, Oberlandesgericht Dresden, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/DE 486] ;

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Bordera v. Bordera 1995 SLT 1176 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 183];

A.J. v. F.J. [2005] CSIH 36, 2005 1 SC 428 [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/UKs 803].

Afrique du Sud
Sonderup v. Tondelli 2001 (1) SA 1171 (CC), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/ZA 309].

Suisse
5P.1/1999, Tribunal fédéral suisse, (Swiss Supreme Court), 29 March 1999, [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/CH 427].

États-Unis d'Amérique
Les cours d'appel fédérales des États-Unis étaient divisées entre 2000 et 2010 quant à l'interprétation à donner à la notion de garde.

Elles ont suivi majoritairement la position de la Cour d'appel du second ressort, laquelle a adopté une interprétation stricte. Voir :

Croll v. Croll, 229 F.3d 133 (2d Cir., 2000; cert. den. Oct. 9, 2001) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 313] ;

Gonzalez v. Gutierrez, 311 F.3d 942 (9th Cir 2002) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 493] ;

Fawcett v. McRoberts, 326 F.3d 491, 500 (4th Cir. 2003), cert. denied 157 L. Ed. 2d 732, 124 S. Ct. 805 (2003) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 494] ;

Abbott v. Abbott, 542 F.3d 1081 (5th Cir. 2008), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 989].

La Cour d'appel du 11ème ressort a néanmoins adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger.

Furnes v. Reeves 362 F.3d 702 (11th Cir. 2004) [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 578].

La question a été tranchée, du moins lorsqu'il s'agit d'un parent demandeur qui a le droit de décider du lieu de résidence habituelle de son enfant ou bien lorsqu'un tribunal de l'État de résidence habituelle de l'enfant cherche à protéger sa propre compétence dans l'attente d'autres jugements, par la Court suprême des États-Unis d'Amérique qui a adopté l'approche suivie à l'étranger.

Abbott v. Abbott (US SC 2010), [Référence INCADAT : HC/E/USf 1029]

La Cour européenne des droits de l'homme a adopté l'approche majoritairement suivie à l'étranger, voir:
 
Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No. 41615/07, 8 January 2009 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1001].

Décision confirmée par la Grande Chambre: Neulinger & Shuruk v. Switzerland, No 41615/07, 6 July 2010 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1323].

Droit de s'opposer à un déplacement

Quand un individu n'a pas de droit de veto sur le déplacement d'un enfant hors de son État de residence habituelle mais peut seulement s'y opposer et demander à un tribunal d'empêcher un tel déplacement, il a été considéré dans plusieurs juridictions que cela n'était pas suffisant pour constituer un droit de garde au sens de la Convention:

Canada
W.(V.) v. S.(D.), 134 DLR 4th 481 (1996), [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/CA 17];

Ireland
W.P.P. v. S.R.W. [2001] ILRM 371, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/IE 271];

Royaume-Uni - Angleterre et Pays de Galles
Re V.-B. (Abduction: Custody Rights) [1999] 2 FLR 192, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 261];

S. v. H. (Abduction: Access Rights) [1998] Fam 49 [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKe 36];

Royaume-Uni - Écosse
Pirrie v. Sawacki 1997 SLT 1160, [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/UKs 188].

Cette interprétation a également été retenue par la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne:

Case C-400/10 PPU J. McB. v. L.E., [Référence INCADAT :HC/E/ 1104].

La Cour de justice a jugé qu'une décision contraire serait incompatible avec les exigences de sécurité juridique et la nécessité de protéger les droits et libertés des autres personnes impliquées, notamment ceux du détenteur de la garde exclusive de l'enfant.

Voir les articles suivants :

P. Beaumont et P.McEleavy, The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, Oxford, OUP, 1999, p. 75 et seq. ;

M. Bailey, « The Right of a Non-Custodial Parent to an Order for Return of a Child Under the Hague Convention », Canadian Journal of Family Law, 1996, p. 287 ;

C. Whitman, « Croll v. Croll: The Second Circuit Limits ‘Custody Rights' Under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction », Tulane Journal of International and Comparative Law, 2001 , p. 605.

Nature limitée des exceptions

Analyse de la jurisprudence de la base de données INCADAT en cours de préparation.

Jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme (CourEDH)